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Electronic - Released March 25, 1996 | !K7 Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Unlike the typically live (or at least live-sounding) mix albums in the DJ-Kicks series, Carl Craig did much post-production work on his volume. The result is a collection of complex, reworked techno from Craig's own Planet E label (by Clark, Designer Music, and the 4th Wave) as well as other crucial techno producers such as Claude Young, Kosmic Messenger, Octagon Man, and Gemini. The addition of a special Carl Craig track -- composed entirely with the use of samples from originals included elsewhere on the collection -- is a nice touch to what proves to be an admirable collection. © John Bush /TiVo
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Chill-out - Released August 19, 1996 | !K7 Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Though it's a close race, Kruder & Dorfmeister make for better DJs than producers, as witnessed by their volume in the DJ-Kicks series. Beginning with downbeat trip-hop including Herbaliser, Statik Sound System, and Thievery Corporation, Kruder & Dorfmeister flow through jazzy drum'n'bass (with Aquasky and JMJ & Flytronix) and techno (with Hardfloor and Showroom Recordings). K&D sound much more relaxed and involved than on their own G-Stoned EP. © John Bush /TiVo
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Chill-out - Released August 19, 1996 | !K7 Records

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 1, 1997 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released March 9, 1998 | !K7 Records

Packed with their own productions and remixes, Smith & Mighty's volume in the DJ-Kicks series does a very good job at blending beat-heavy tracks with the pair's occasional experimentalist flair. Including the early Bacharach covers "Walk on By" and "Anyone Who Had a Heart," plus a remix of another longtime pop classic ("The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face") and tracks by other Bristol massives like DJ Krust, DJ-Kicks showcases the Smith & Mighty production team better than Bass Is Maternal. © John Bush /TiVo
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Electronic - Released May 10, 1999 | !K7 Records

Just as sampladelic as their debut album, Thievery Corporation's entry in Studio !K7's growing DJ-Kicks mix album series charts the duo's interest in not only blunted trip-hop but also Brazilian music, exotica, and easy listening. Featuring a few of their own tracks ("It Takes a Thief," "Coming from the Top") plus tracks by Rockers Hi-Fi and Fun-da-Mental, DJ Kicks is a solid chillout album. © Keith Farley /TiVo
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Electronic - Released October 18, 1999 | !K7 Records

In the late '90s, it may be seen as obsolete to try and release a compilation that is neither 1) trance nor 2) trance. Yes, while the popular dance world was spinning on its own narrow axis, there were still musicians like Kid Loco bucking the trends and releasing chill-out albums like this: his own clandestinely mischievous installment in the DJ-Kicks series. The problem is that despite such a non-conformist stance, there's something wrong in its unpleasant mesh of moods. This means that while including songs such as the easy-breathing trip-hop of Jazzanova's "Introspection" or the cycling mantra of Underworld's "Blueski" make for an interesting mix, the fact that they are so close next to so many songs centered around childish jabs (a porno-sampling track by Common Ground, the cartoon-squealing track by Tom Tyler, etc.), the tones tend to cancel each other out. Loco seems lost in deciding whether to make a straight-forward, jazz-centric, chill-out album or a slightly nutty experiment. If he went confidently into one direction, the results would have been much better. Because, again, for every magnetic track like Boards of Canada' "Happy Cycling," there is a silly track like a remix of Deep Season's "Jesus Christ Almighty" right next door. In other words, right when the mood is being set, the listener is covertly being taken into another. Which isn't such a bad plan. It's just poorly done since these exact shifts seem sadly slipshod instead of effective. This methodology of going for the chill-out and simultaneously trying to tickle your ribs just grates after awhile. So in the end, Loco's mixing skill and urge to fiddle with chill-out templates are laudable. However, the entire compilation still feels defective, and an opening sample probably best explains the reason why: a man asks, "Don't you know I'm loco?" While the answer might be, "yes," it might also be, "not loco enough." © Dean Carlson /TiVo
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Trip Hop - Released March 6, 2000 | !K7 Records

Tosca's second album Suzuki takes a lighter, airier approach to the trip-hop terrain that Opera explored. The spare, shimmering title track's delicate synth textures, minimal beats, mellow rhythms, and breathy vocal samples set the tone for the rest of the album's laid-back tracks. Though "Orozco," "Bass on the Boat," and "Ocean Beat" are more immediate variations on Tosca's relaxed sound, for the most part, Suzuki offers a locked groove of hypnotic, deeply chilled-out epics. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Electronic - Released April 25, 2000 | !K7 Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Appetite for Disctruction is nothing short of a post-modern masterpiece. Post-modernism may have become passé, killed by its own irony and countless moronic interpretations, but understand it or not, care for it or not, there is little doubt that post-modernism and its deconstruction of culture have dominated intellectual thought post-Vietnam and into the new millennium. Post-modernism may be played out, but there is always room for one more statement of the times and of the future, especially if it as brilliant as Appetite for Disctruction. The album is electronica with a statement, a deconstruction of the musical trends of our times. Funkstörung presents a complete concept. From the art direction of the jewel case to the irony of the liner notes to the mundane song titles to the name of the album itself, Appetite for Discstruction is a cohesive vision: the smashing of previous musical boundaries and the unity of these genres into something completely new. Funkstörung creates an aural world of maddeningly complex soundscapes. Appetite for Disctruction takes the listener on a such a lush mental trip that it is difficult to wrap your mind it as a whole. Moving seamlessly from trip-hop to soul music to head-nodding dance beats to the bleeps of sci-fi imagery to straight-up hip-hop to general cacophony, Appetite for Disctruction is an experiment in sound. This isn't mass-market, pop-friendly, Fatboy Slim electronica. It is the exploration of the genre and all of its influences from new wave to hip-hop to R&B to computer programming. Along with Kraftwerk's pioneering work and Underworld's artistry, Funkstörung's Appetite for Disctruction is an essential piece of electronica for the collector's vaults. © Brian Musich /TiVo
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Electronic - Released June 5, 2000 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released October 30, 2000 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released June 25, 2001 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released July 2, 2001 | !K7 Records

This installment of the outstanding DJ-Kicks mix series highlights the talents of the German-based Trüby Trio, spearheaded by DJ Rainer Trüby. The collective have assembled a wide variety of crucial tracks that are highly representative of the future jazz that is not only amazingly accessible for newcomers to the sound, but will also have beatheads scurrying for the obscure tracks at the local record shop. Trüby and company gracefully start off with laid-back Afro-beat rhythms and pick up the tempo with a subtlety that is uncommon for mix CDs, peaking with the Afronaught (aka Orin Walters) masterpiece "Transcend Me." The crew ventures into deep house territory before bringing the intensity down again for the conclusion with the help of Compost labelmates Fauna Flash. An outstanding mix by some of today's most creative electronic musicians and producers. © Rob Theakston /TiVo
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Electronic - Released January 28, 2002 | !K7 Records

It's difficult to expect anything good from an artist whose reported m.o. includes Manhattan's legendary 52nd Street scene of the '40s, Motown during the '60s (he claims several Holland/Dozier/Zinger compositions), and a credit on "Strings of Life." (Mr. Zinger is actually former Galliano frontman Rob Gallagher.) Yes, Earl Zinger is a humorist at heart, a sleazy lounge persona who makes Jimi Tenor sound like Thomas Brinkmann. And in the worldwide dance scene, he has plenty to poke fun at. Put Your Phazers on Stun Throw Your Health Food Skyward offers plenty of hilarity, from the house-holiday sendup "Escape From Ibiza" to the Fatboy Slim-on-safari "Last of the Great Bassline Hunters." Zinger also croaks a pot fantasy to the tune of "My Favorite Things" over a Badly Drawn Boy loop, offers several tracks with cartoon chipmunk vocals, and faithfully covers War's "Galaxy" with either no discernible irony, or loads of it. Surprisingly, there are plenty of great productions too; "On My Way Home" is a crazed mambo shuffle delivered by Vincent Price, "Song 2Wo" an indecipherable Blur cover that quickly devolves into an excellent rocksteady number, complete with heavily reverbed vocals. Zinger fails to answer the age-old question of whether humor belongs in music, but he certainly offers an entertaining set of songs. © John Bush /TiVo
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Electronic - Released February 25, 2002 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released May 27, 2002 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released July 29, 2002 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released August 12, 2002 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released October 14, 2002 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released November 4, 2002 | !K7 Records