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Electronic - Released July 14, 2017 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released April 20, 2009 | !K7 Records

The lack of releases and exposure from Peter Kruder and Richard Dorfmeister during the 2000s may not have been entirely a bad thing; granted, their early remixes and productions as Kruder & Dorfmeister were landmarks in trip-hop, but if they'd continued on a similar release schedule, they might have gone the way of countless other acts trying (and failing) to avoid the forest-for-the-trees issues that plagued both producers and listeners. Dorfmeister's Tosca project with Rupert Huber remained relatively consistent, although without a full-length of new productions in quite a few years. No Hassle, then, arrived at just the right time. The sound isn't a surprise at all, with watery grooves, soft keyboards, and, early on, an inconstant use of backbeat. Midway through, however, the record finally gets in a few straight-ahead productions (including "Oysters in May"), but with all the immaculate sound and studied arrangements that fans would expect. Dorfmeister and Huber occasionally hark back to the haunted detachment of much classic IDM and trip-hop during the '90s, but as much of the record rests with the smoothest of jazz-fusion from the late '70s and early '80s. Actually a two-disc program, No Hassle includes a full disc of live material, recorded at the Ars Electronica festival. © John Bush /TiVo
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Trip Hop - Released February 24, 2003 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released July 14, 2017 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released November 11, 2014 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released July 27, 2009 | !K7 Records

This limited-edition release collects the Herbaliser Band's 2000 and 2009 full-fledged instrumental band re-creations of their more electronic and beat-heavy studio albums. And it's a seriously cool and funky trip from start to finish across two discs. In place of samples and synth grooves, there are horns, live percussion, and deep bass guitars, with some scratching thrown in for good measure. If the original albums leaned toward hip-hop, these reinterpretations come across as buzzed-out jazz scores for some imaginary spy films. Indeed, a case could be made that Ollie Teeba and Jake Wherry are more accomplished jazzy artisans than hip-hoppers. Session 2 sees an increase in dynamism and ability, as they've only grown in their ability to translate their earlier works into the big-band realm. As invigorating and breathless as the film scores of Quincy Jones and John Barry, these sessions pay great respect to the past, while Teeba and Wherry make a case that the book shouldn't be closed on cinematic jazz grooves. Stellar. © Tim DiGravina /TiVo
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Electronic - Released September 15, 2008 | !K7 Records

English electronica, hip-hop, and pop producer Tim Simenon is the brains behind Bomb the Bass, a project whose origins stretch back to the late '80s. While traces of Bomb the Bass' history can still be heard in Simenon's fondness for intriguing samples, 2008's Future Chaos takes the sound someplace new. With its futuristic, IDM-based sound complete with glitchy sonic textures balanced against classic bass-heavy rumble, Future Chaos is both familiar and progressive at once. But it's Simenon's knack for pop -- which he injects via vocals by the likes of Mark Lanegan, Jon Spencer, Paul Conboy, and Fujiya & Miyagi -- that takes the album to the next level. A second disc of remixes puts icing on the cake. © All Music Guide /TiVo
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Electronic - Released November 2, 2018 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released March 20, 2006 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released October 15, 2007 | !K7 Records

3 stars out of 5 -- "[With] Rhodes warmth and beating-heart bass and drum programming....[The] second disc of live recordings finds Cobblestone Jazz in their element." © TiVo
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Electronic - Released April 14, 2003 | !K7 Records

Whether heard as a jarring abandonment of the contemporary R&B rulebook or a blanching of the form's all-too-necessary characteristics, Spacek continues down its own little path for better or worse on its second album in three years. Vintage Hi-Tech isn't much of a change from Curvatia. Steve Spacek's voice barely raises above living-room chit-chat volume and drifts atop splintered, discombobulated grooves; flicks of keyboard; and the odd textural garnish. There's a nearly baffling absence of radio-friendly hooks, leaving the listener to hone in on the group's idiosyncratic production tricks. Though awash in a battery of percussive patterns, these tracks are songs in the technical, traditional sense. A less-than-immersed listen wouldn't indicate this, because they hardly resemble what you hear in the mainstream. Nothing explodes, everything is subtle -- which could play a role in the biggest argument against them: that they're too timid and tentative, that some more expressive and more effective moments could be wrenched out of the songs' core elements. What's evident on this album is that Spacek is now even more about sounds than the verse-chorus-verse pattern. And the sounds they employ are less likely to be smears of strings and disorienting keyboard effects, each of which are used sparingly in comparison to the debut. All time spent searching for the big hook or the quick fix of larger-than-life sounds is lost; it's best to let the group take you on a head trip. Love 'em or hate 'em, you have to admit that Spacek has their own sound working in their favor. They are the lone purveyors of micro-soul, and they set the standard with each successive release. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Electronic - Released January 26, 2009 | !K7 Records

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Chill-out - Released August 19, 1996 | !K7 Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Though it's a close race, Kruder & Dorfmeister make for better DJs than producers, as witnessed by their volume in the DJ-Kicks series. Beginning with downbeat trip-hop including Herbaliser, Statik Sound System, and Thievery Corporation, Kruder & Dorfmeister flow through jazzy drum'n'bass (with Aquasky and JMJ & Flytronix) and techno (with Hardfloor and Showroom Recordings). K&D sound much more relaxed and involved than on their own G-Stoned EP. © John Bush /TiVo
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Pop - Released December 6, 2019 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released September 6, 2019 | !K7 Records

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Trip Hop - Released March 6, 2000 | !K7 Records

Tosca's second album Suzuki takes a lighter, airier approach to the trip-hop terrain that Opera explored. The spare, shimmering title track's delicate synth textures, minimal beats, mellow rhythms, and breathy vocal samples set the tone for the rest of the album's laid-back tracks. Though "Orozco," "Bass on the Boat," and "Ocean Beat" are more immediate variations on Tosca's relaxed sound, for the most part, Suzuki offers a locked groove of hypnotic, deeply chilled-out epics. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Electronic - Released February 19, 2016 | !K7 Records

Two decades after fellow Detroiters Carl Craig, Claude Young, and Stacey Pullen were among the first contributors to !K7's DJ-Kicks, Kenny Dixon, Jr. adds to the series with a largely low-key, genre-spanning set. The selections suggest that the mix, or most of it, was knocked out long before its February 2016 release; not one of the tracks was first issued later than 2014. Perhaps Dixon was content to wait out a protracted licensing snag, though it's not as if he has a rep for spinning strictly new arrivals. Besides, the man does tend to take his time. Certain coveted KDJ productions have surfaced years after they were first whispered about, and he hasn't been all that quick to capitalize on re-pressings of his output. Take one of this set's highlights, Andrés' "El Ritmo de Mi Gente!," which quickly multiplied in cost after Dixon issued it in 2008. Though Dixon doesn't include any of his productions and, just as unfortunate, abstains from the shout-outs and other vocal interjections for which he is correctly celebrated, his presence is felt beyond the frequent but easy transitions. The Andrés cut samples the same Letta Mbulu-fronted piece from Quincy Jones' Roots score heard on Dixon's own "Meanwhile Back at Home." Dopehead's rugged "Guttah Guttah" comes from Detroit's underground hip-hop scene, where Dixon got his start, and was produced by Nick Speed, another one of his Mahogani Music artists. The Motor City is also represented with the wobbling Platinum Pied Pipers remix of Rich Medina and Sy Smith's "Can't Hold Back," and a neo-electro jam from Marcellus Pittman. Though Dixon has no evident connection to the Rodney Hunter remix of Fort Knox Five's "Uptown Tricks," it shows that his spot for Chic-styled disco remains as soft as when he released the Sister Sledge-sampling "One Night in the Disco." Additionally, Dixon judiciously edited over one-third of the tracks to facilitate flow, his craftiness most evident in the way Talc's breezy part-soft rock/part-Daft Punk hybrid melts into one of Beady Belle's graceful lounge laments. Dixon's taste dips back several decades, but he keeps it relatively contemporary all the way through. The oldest track is Nightmares on Wax's "Les Nuits," which bubbles out of Flying Lotus' "Tea Leaf Dancers" and, once more, draws from the Quincy Jones catalog. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Electronic - Released October 24, 2011 | !K7 Records

Described as Kraftwerk in reverse, German three-piece the Brandt Brauer Frick Ensemble's second album, the ironically titled Mr. Machine, continues to push the boundaries of techno music on eight tracks inspired just as much by the minimalist classical works of Steve Reich as their Berlin hometown's dance scene. Suggesting that their organic acoustic sound is still very much a work in progress, four tracks from their 2010 debut, You Make Me Real, also appear here in remixed form. But despite the addition of a ten-piece orchestra, the changes are subtle rather than bombastic, simply removing the stuttering bleeps from the slow-building rhythmic jazz of "Bop," layering the jaunty bossa nova-tinged "You Make Me Real" with more percussion, and adding breezy horns to the timpani-led chamber pop of "Teufelsleiter." While these slightly tinkered new versions provide a certain warmth largely missing from the originals, fans of their inventive first offering may rightly feel a little shortchanged, even more so considering the only brand-new composition is the opening title track, a brief 65-second instrumental that peters out before its ominous footsteps and unsettling ambient effects can reach their horror movie score potential. Luckily, the three cover versions ensure there is at least something a little more substantial. Berlin-based chanteuse Emika lends her distant detached tones to "Pretend," a minimal acoustic take on her claustrophobic brand of techno, "606 'N' Rock 'N' Roll" serves up a dramatic string-soaked reworking of Danish producer James Braun's deep house signature tune, while the album's most conventional moment sees a slow-building four-to-the-floor rhythm accompany snatches of Agnes Obel's indie folk tones on "On Powdered Ground (Mixed Lines)." The trio's experimental nature means it's unlikely that this is the last listeners will hear of most of the material here, but while the slim new-pickings track list is disappointing, Mr. Machine at least proves they're heading in the right direction. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Electronic - Released February 15, 2019 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released June 28, 2019 | !K7 Records