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Electronic - Released November 2, 2018 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released July 14, 2017 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released November 11, 2014 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released July 27, 2009 | !K7 Records

This limited-edition release collects the Herbaliser Band's 2000 and 2009 full-fledged instrumental band re-creations of their more electronic and beat-heavy studio albums. And it's a seriously cool and funky trip from start to finish across two discs. In place of samples and synth grooves, there are horns, live percussion, and deep bass guitars, with some scratching thrown in for good measure. If the original albums leaned toward hip-hop, these reinterpretations come across as buzzed-out jazz scores for some imaginary spy films. Indeed, a case could be made that Ollie Teeba and Jake Wherry are more accomplished jazzy artisans than hip-hoppers. Session 2 sees an increase in dynamism and ability, as they've only grown in their ability to translate their earlier works into the big-band realm. As invigorating and breathless as the film scores of Quincy Jones and John Barry, these sessions pay great respect to the past, while Teeba and Wherry make a case that the book shouldn't be closed on cinematic jazz grooves. Stellar. © Tim DiGravina /TiVo
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Electronic - Released April 20, 2009 | !K7 Records

The lack of releases and exposure from Peter Kruder and Richard Dorfmeister during the 2000s may not have been entirely a bad thing; granted, their early remixes and productions as Kruder & Dorfmeister were landmarks in trip-hop, but if they'd continued on a similar release schedule, they might have gone the way of countless other acts trying (and failing) to avoid the forest-for-the-trees issues that plagued both producers and listeners. Dorfmeister's Tosca project with Rupert Huber remained relatively consistent, although without a full-length of new productions in quite a few years. No Hassle, then, arrived at just the right time. The sound isn't a surprise at all, with watery grooves, soft keyboards, and, early on, an inconstant use of backbeat. Midway through, however, the record finally gets in a few straight-ahead productions (including "Oysters in May"), but with all the immaculate sound and studied arrangements that fans would expect. Dorfmeister and Huber occasionally hark back to the haunted detachment of much classic IDM and trip-hop during the '90s, but as much of the record rests with the smoothest of jazz-fusion from the late '70s and early '80s. Actually a two-disc program, No Hassle includes a full disc of live material, recorded at the Ars Electronica festival. © John Bush /TiVo
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Electronic - Released January 26, 2009 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released September 15, 2008 | !K7 Records

English electronica, hip-hop, and pop producer Tim Simenon is the brains behind Bomb the Bass, a project whose origins stretch back to the late '80s. While traces of Bomb the Bass' history can still be heard in Simenon's fondness for intriguing samples, 2008's Future Chaos takes the sound someplace new. With its futuristic, IDM-based sound complete with glitchy sonic textures balanced against classic bass-heavy rumble, Future Chaos is both familiar and progressive at once. But it's Simenon's knack for pop -- which he injects via vocals by the likes of Mark Lanegan, Jon Spencer, Paul Conboy, and Fujiya & Miyagi -- that takes the album to the next level. A second disc of remixes puts icing on the cake. © All Music Guide /TiVo
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Electronic - Released October 15, 2007 | !K7 Records

3 stars out of 5 -- "[With] Rhodes warmth and beating-heart bass and drum programming....[The] second disc of live recordings finds Cobblestone Jazz in their element." © TiVo
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Electronic - Released March 20, 2006 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released April 14, 2003 | !K7 Records

Whether heard as a jarring abandonment of the contemporary R&B rulebook or a blanching of the form's all-too-necessary characteristics, Spacek continues down its own little path for better or worse on its second album in three years. Vintage Hi-Tech isn't much of a change from Curvatia. Steve Spacek's voice barely raises above living-room chit-chat volume and drifts atop splintered, discombobulated grooves; flicks of keyboard; and the odd textural garnish. There's a nearly baffling absence of radio-friendly hooks, leaving the listener to hone in on the group's idiosyncratic production tricks. Though awash in a battery of percussive patterns, these tracks are songs in the technical, traditional sense. A less-than-immersed listen wouldn't indicate this, because they hardly resemble what you hear in the mainstream. Nothing explodes, everything is subtle -- which could play a role in the biggest argument against them: that they're too timid and tentative, that some more expressive and more effective moments could be wrenched out of the songs' core elements. What's evident on this album is that Spacek is now even more about sounds than the verse-chorus-verse pattern. And the sounds they employ are less likely to be smears of strings and disorienting keyboard effects, each of which are used sparingly in comparison to the debut. All time spent searching for the big hook or the quick fix of larger-than-life sounds is lost; it's best to let the group take you on a head trip. Love 'em or hate 'em, you have to admit that Spacek has their own sound working in their favor. They are the lone purveyors of micro-soul, and they set the standard with each successive release. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Trip Hop - Released February 24, 2003 | !K7 Records