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Electronic - Released January 26, 2018 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released February 10, 2017 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released December 15, 2016 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released June 29, 2015 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released November 17, 2014 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released October 6, 2014 | !K7 Records

A slowly evolving project up to this point, Richard Dorfmeister and Rupert Huber's group Tosca flip the script with their 2014 effort Outta Here, a popping album of indie dance and retro funk from a group that used to trade in dubby downtempo and tasteful, immaculate electronica. Seems like here, they've slipped their disco, as "Have Some Fun" incorporates Chic-like basslines while "My Sweet Monday" fingersnaps with a retro, '70s shuffle, all things Hot Chip or LCD Soundsystem have done before, and with better results. M-People at their most sterile come to mind as Dorfmeister and Huber apply their previous production techniques to music that should be delivered with more guts, but the good news is that single-track downloads exist and the twangy bit of hero worship called "Harry Dean" is a worthy tribute to Mr. Stanton. Otherwise, we should all close our eyes until someone returns the old Tosca to its rightful place, no questions asked. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Electronic - Released August 19, 2013 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released April 8, 2013 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released February 4, 2013 | !K7 Records

Like BBC DJ John Peel explained the Fall, Richard Dorfmeister and Rupert Huber's slowly evolving Tosca project are a case of "always the same, always different." The Viennese duo's 2013 effort, Odeon, is certainly tangibly different than 2009's No Hassle, with more vocals, fewer jazzy feelings, and more nocturnal elements figuring into the mix this time. It's that last bit that will set a veteran trip-hop fan in motion, as well it should, with key tracks like "What If" (sexy, lazy, rainy day music with vocalist Sarah Carlier buttering it all with soul) and "Stuttgart" (sounds like the Orb mixing Primal Scream with vocalist Lucas Santtana bringing some Tropicália flair to the session) providing perfect soundtracks for any loft littered with broken dreams and designer labels. Reverb and the spirit of Serge Gainsbourg drip out of the speakers as Roland Neuwirth strolls the back allies from Paris to Kingston on "Cavallo," and with "Bonjour" closing the set, you've got the proper amount of humor (the title) and simplicity (the track is comprised of strings, a harp, and a heartbeat) to make the album identifiable as Tosca. Atmospherics and meticulous recording are as important as ever, and while you can take a copy to the stereo shop to make sure that amp sounds rich and warm enough, the album is slightly more song-based than previous efforts, so finicky fans might gripe when the lyrics go quite Depeche Mode or James Blake. It's only a slight caution, and with everything else sounding like new dreams recorded on a familiar sound stage, Tosca regulars will find Odeon a demure return to form. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Trip Hop - Released March 6, 2000 | !K7 Records

Tosca's second album Suzuki takes a lighter, airier approach to the trip-hop terrain that Opera explored. The spare, shimmering title track's delicate synth textures, minimal beats, mellow rhythms, and breathy vocal samples set the tone for the rest of the album's laid-back tracks. Though "Orozco," "Bass on the Boat," and "Ocean Beat" are more immediate variations on Tosca's relaxed sound, for the most part, Suzuki offers a locked groove of hypnotic, deeply chilled-out epics. © Heather Phares /TiVo