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Alternative & Indie - To be released June 19, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 21, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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More than two years after the release of his first album Aromanticism, a critically-acclaimed blend of subdued alt-rock and electro-soul, Moses Sumney finally unleashes his full potential on this first half of an album which will be released in its entirety on May 15th 2020. Having familiarised himself with the EP format, it comes as no surprise that he announced the release of this second album in two parts, as if to better prepare his audience for new melodic twists and turns… On this first volume of græ, Moses Sumney also composes for four hands with the weird-but-wonderful Ezra Miller on boxes and also also also and and and, allows himself an interlude aided by Jill Scott’s suave vocals (jill/jack) and even calls on the talents of extraordinary producer FKJ for Colouour. These collaborations err more on the safe side but are nevertheless exciting, foreshadowing more great things to come. The former aromanticism, somewhere between melancholy and detachment, gives way to resounding sound (Virile, Conveyor), tracks that literally stick with you (Polly) and some more experimental sounds (Neither/Nor), all for our greatest enjoyment. Roll on part 2. © Steffi Njoh Monny/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 7, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 24, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 6, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 13, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 10, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 14, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 12, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 4, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Three years after My Woman, an album which saw her move even further away from her main influences (Cat Power, Hope Sandoval from Mazzy Star, Kate Bush, PJ Harvey) as she pursued her grungy indie folk (which incorporated Americana and vintage sounds) Angel Olsen has signed a more silky, shimmering and even luxurious production here. There are no commercial compromises in All Mirrors, just a clear desire to soak her music in less troubled waters… The sound is bigger, the arrangements more elaborate and the instrumentation even includes strings, again impeccably measured. Much like Annie Clark a.k.a. St Vincent, Olsen blends a powerful explosion of fury and strong self-acceptance, boosted by impressive melodies. The American is also at ease in moving from dark atmospheres to almost playful sequences. A stylistic richness that becomes even greater each time you listen to it. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 19, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 12, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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i,i

Alternative & Indie - Released August 9, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
“There’s similarities and tributaries through all the Bon Iver records leading to this one and that still flow through this one. It’s an expansive sound”. This is how Justin Vernon, the driving force behind Bon Iver, defines his fourth studio album. 12 years of his life have passed, during which his project went from the wintry solitude of For Emma, Forever Ago, to the chamber-pop spring of its eponymous record, to the feverish summer glitch storm of 22, A Million. This fourth season didn’t come easy, either. The promotional tour for the aforementioned third album ended abruptly, due to Vernon’s struggle with anxiety and depression. i,i was created in that aftermath, as a synthesis of his career – a multi-layered autumn where sonic landscapes flow one into the other, and impressionistic instrumentals, glitchy samples and vocal harmonies pile on top of each other seamlessly, before being torn away to reveal the bare bones canvas lying beneath. This retrospective approach to his music is interlaced with cryptic lyrics that seem to ponder Vernon’s misanthropic tendencies: “I should've known / That I shouldn't hide/ To compromise and to covet/ All what’s inside “ he mourns on the electro-folk crescendo of Faith, undercut by growling bass and haunting background vocals. On the album closer RABi, which is a play on the words “I could rob, bye bye”, Bon Iver seems to find peace at last, in a side nod to listeners: “Sun light feels good now, don't it? And I don't have a leaving plan/ But something's gotta ease your mind/ But it's all fine, or it's all crime anyway “. It’s a cathartic finish, for a troubled artist who seems to have temporarily fought off his demons, as well as the audience – we who’ve followed him and applauded him since the beginning. © Alexis Renaudat/Qobuz

Alternative & Indie - Released July 31, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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When Angel Olsen first emerged as a solo artist in the early 2010s, it was with a spare, haunting acoustic lo-fi that put all focus on her vulnerable, idiosyncratic vocal delivery. As she shifted from country-inflected indie folk to a brooding, more volatile garage-rock blend over the course of her next couple albums, even adding synths to the mix on 2017's My Woman, she managed to keep her tormented songs distinctly intimate. She does it again on All Mirrors, even when lavish arrangements and sometimes seismic production make full use of a 14-piece orchestra alongside guitars, synths, and a thundering low end. All Mirrors was co-produced by Olsen and Burn Your Fire for No Witness' John Congleton, who also mixed it, and features string arrangements by Jherek Bischoff and Ben Babbitt. Babbitt also co-wrote some of the music with Olsen. (The lyrics are all Olsen.) Opening track "Lark" sets the stage, developing from a reticent mumble over distant-sounding strings to a yelping, echoing symphonic pop and back again. "Echoing" may be understating it; the song and much of the studio-made album sound like they were recorded in a cathedral, with instruments simmering at a distance before closing in on the singer at opportune moments. Meanwhile, she fills the reverberating expanses with pleas, frustrations, and sad epiphanies on a set of songs concerned with deciding to walk away from toxic relationships, as the track list guides listeners through "Spring," "Summer," and "Endgame." Amid more theatrical entries, "Too Easy" takes on a dreamy, synth-heavy semi-disco ("Any way you want to, honey/Take me, show me how you want me"). Elsewhere, the devastating "Tonight" sounds as if delivered through tears, combining half-exhaled vocals with the elegant Romanticism of its orchestra accompaniment. The album closes on "Chance," a dramatic, cabaret-style offering that executes the lyrics "It's hard to say forever love/Forever is just so far" with a confident if quivering lilt. All Mirrors was originally conceived as a double album with solo renditions of the same songs, but as the fully realized tracks took shape, Olsen committed to a definitive version. Though she may have initially built her reputation on stark and brittle atmospheres, it turns out that her trademark vulnerability is only elevated by these stirring, highly stylized interpretations, making it a risk that pays off in spades. ~ Marcy Donelson
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 24, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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Lousy with stadium concert excess, rock star foppery and the profuse heresies of disco, 70s music was once an easy target for defamers. But that much-maligned era has become a ubiquitous influence in today's fractured musical soundscape. Young guitar bands routinely gulp down Zep licks and Iommi chords, digest the relevant lessons and chunder up fresh manifestos, which in the case of heavy stoner/psych rock lords Black Mountain's fifth full length means hard, fast knots of guitar riffage, Hawkwind-esque lyrics and a devotion to the twin lyrical icons of 70's rock: cars and sex. Black Mountain founder/leader Stephen McBean recently added high octane fuel to his awe for 70's-influenced rock by learning to drive at the tender age of 48. Getting behind the wheel for the first time led to "Licensed to Drive," where he echoes Deep Purple's immortal "Highway Star," by exclaiming, "Live now / Speed thrills / Hunted by the radar / The Thunder of the Steel" while synthesizers wail with abandon. Rather than a KISS allusion, the album's title is supposedly named for a short-lived Dodge muscle car that was discontinued in 1985. With his road jones satiated he moves toward pleasures of the flesh in "High Rise": "Thrusting cement into heaven / Penetrating the clouds / Staring us down / Thinking you're all that the world spins around / The loneliest cock in the sky." Mixed by John Congelton, Destroyer is sonically compressed, in-your-face and meant to be played loud. A blunt-edged continuation of Black Mountain's evolution into intricate layering, inventive, hooky arrangements and odd touches like acoustic guitar openings and vocoder choruses, Destroyer, dedicated to "all the warriors who have left the stadium," finds new driver McBean mastering the musical wile of looking in the rearview while simultaneously keeping an artistic eye on what's ahead. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Soul - Released May 10, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music - Qobuzissime
What is my purpose? What will come of the legacy of those who have influenced me? And what will I leave behind? These are all the big questions that Jamila Woods asks herself going into her second album suitably named Legacy! Legacy!, a Qobuzissime album! Three years after the release of Heavn, the soul sister from Chicago brings together twelve songs all named after the artists that influenced them. Musicians, painters, writers, activists, poets, they’re all there! And the lucky few are: Betty Davis, Zora Neale Hurston, Nikki Giovanni, Sonia Sanchez, Frida Kahlo, Eartha Kitt, Miles Davis, Muddy Waters, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Sun Ra, Octavia Butler and James Baldwin. There is nothing obvious or didactic here as the young African-American who is ever-so attached to her native Chicago never does out-and-out covers but less subtle “in the style ofs” all while retaining her own distinct style. A poet one day (she acts as artistic director for YCA, a center dedicated to young poets) and a musician the other, she is even a teacher on bank holidays! As the worthy heir of Erykah Badu and Lauryn Hill, all her words are wrapped around ultra-slick grooves with a modernized nu-soul twist. When it comes to features, Jamila Woods helps her local economy by inviting along friends that, for the most part, come from the underground scene of the Windy City: the trumpetist Nico Segal, MC Saba, Nitty Scott, theMIND, Jasminfire. Chance the Rapper’s protégé has mixed intelligence and class, commitment, enjoyment and groove into 49 minutes. Perfect. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 26, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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You’d expect nothing less from these two. Sam France and Jonathan Rado, the wacky duo who have come to embody the psychedelic rock scene of the late 2010s with their verbose creativity, have released their fifth record. But is it their best? It certainly is in terms of maturity. The lack-luster …And Star Power (2014) left much to be desired due to its trippy and hallucinogenic sound that appeared to rip off Todd Rundgen. The following album Hang (2017) was a vast improvement and not far off the classic We are the 21st Century Ambassadors of Peace and Magic (2013). Sam and Jonathan will soon be entering their thirties; their faces have matured along with their rock’n’roll sound. “How does it feel to be livin’ a lie” sings Sam on Livin’ a lie before he concludes “We should just be friends” on The Conclusion. The duo has aged, mixed things up, and above all, wizened.Rado has practically become an invaluable and omnipresent member of the world of indie rock: he has worked as a producer for the Lemon Twigs and has been called in for assistance by artists such as Alex Cameron and Father John Misty. He is also responsible for the production of Weyes Blood’s impressive Titanic Rising. With such a résumé Rado is, indeed, indispensable. With Seeing Other People, the duo displays an eighties rock-funk sound, like MGMT had done with Little Dark Age; an arsenal of synths (Face the Facts), a new voice (that of a weathered seducer on Mona) and their own new sense of orchestration (Livin’ a lie). The melodies, while less forceful, are more complex and richer. One wonders what they will achieve in their forties. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 17, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 28, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 7, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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