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Alternative & Indie - To be released October 9, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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World - To be released October 2, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - To be released August 28, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 26, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 9, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 28, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 6, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 27, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

Between his 2008 masterpiece, the global hit For Emma, Forever Ago, and 2011's eponymous Bon Iver, Justin Vernon was preparing to shed his old skin. Specifically, this 2009 transition EP, dubbed Blood Bank featuring bonus tracks from For Emma, Forever Ago (the opening Blood Bank and the very folksy Beach Baby ) as well as unexpected interludes of minimalist and repetitive music ( Babys with its whiff of the second coming of Philip Glass and Steve Reich). As for Wood, the fourth track that closes the EP, its use of autotune intrigued not only his long-time fans, but also a certain Kanye West who would sample it on Lost in the World on his album My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy... To mark 10 years since its release, Blood Bank has been released in a deluxe edition with bonus, live, versions of the four tracks, recorded in Stockholm, Dallas, London and Paris. Vernon's thoroughly hallucinated and hallucinating spectral folk vignettes become small symphonies of cosmic and new age folk. Intense. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 27, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 24, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 10, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 7, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 24, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 6, 2020 | Jagjaguwar

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 4, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Three years after My Woman, an album which saw her move even further away from her main influences (Cat Power, Hope Sandoval from Mazzy Star, Kate Bush, PJ Harvey) as she pursued her grungy indie folk (which incorporated Americana and vintage sounds) Angel Olsen has signed a more silky, shimmering and even luxurious production here. There are no commercial compromises in All Mirrors, just a clear desire to soak her music in less troubled waters… The sound is bigger, the arrangements more elaborate and the instrumentation even includes strings, again impeccably measured. Much like Annie Clark a.k.a. St Vincent, Olsen blends a powerful explosion of fury and strong self-acceptance, boosted by impressive melodies. The American is also at ease in moving from dark atmospheres to almost playful sequences. A stylistic richness that becomes even greater each time you listen to it. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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i,i

Alternative & Indie - Released August 9, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
“There’s similarities and tributaries through all the Bon Iver records leading to this one and that still flow through this one. It’s an expansive sound”. This is how Justin Vernon, the driving force behind Bon Iver, defines his fourth studio album. 12 years of his life have passed, during which his project went from the wintry solitude of For Emma, Forever Ago, to the chamber-pop spring of its eponymous record, to the feverish summer glitch storm of 22, A Million. This fourth season didn’t come easy, either. The promotional tour for the aforementioned third album ended abruptly, due to Vernon’s struggle with anxiety and depression. i,i was created in that aftermath, as a synthesis of his career – a multi-layered autumn where sonic landscapes flow one into the other, and impressionistic instrumentals, glitchy samples and vocal harmonies pile on top of each other seamlessly, before being torn away to reveal the bare bones canvas lying beneath. This retrospective approach to his music is interlaced with cryptic lyrics that seem to ponder Vernon’s misanthropic tendencies: “I should've known / That I shouldn't hide/ To compromise and to covet/ All what’s inside “ he mourns on the electro-folk crescendo of Faith, undercut by growling bass and haunting background vocals. On the album closer RABi, which is a play on the words “I could rob, bye bye”, Bon Iver seems to find peace at last, in a side nod to listeners: “Sun light feels good now, don't it? And I don't have a leaving plan/ But something's gotta ease your mind/ But it's all fine, or it's all crime anyway “. It’s a cathartic finish, for a troubled artist who seems to have temporarily fought off his demons, as well as the audience – we who’ve followed him and applauded him since the beginning. © Alexis Renaudat/Qobuz
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Pop - Released June 7, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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It's hard to say where this falls on the "If you can't beat 'em, join 'em" spectrum, but comic, actor, and musician Tim Heidecker's 2019 album What the Brokenhearted Do may be the most inspired example to date of how to respond to Internet trolling. Heidecker makes no secret of his leftist politics in his social media posts or on his albums Too Dumb for Suicide: Tim Heidecker's Trump Songs and Cainthology: Songs in the Key of Cain. For reasons best known to themselves, some folks who didn't care for Heidecker's dislike of Donald Trump began spreading a rumor that Heidecker's wife had gotten so sick of his leftist ways that she left him, with someone going so far as to fake divorce papers and post them online. Heidecker's response was curious but inspired: he wrote an album of breakup songs about a man struggling with divorce, even though Heidecker was and remains happily married. What the Brokenhearted Do may have started as some sort of joke (no great surprise coming from the co-creator of Awesome Show, Great Job!), but by the time he finished, Heidecker had created a superb homage to the downbeat side of '70s soft rock. Jonathan Rado of Foxygen helped Heidecker record What the Brokenhearted Do, and while the two have incorporated some subtle elements of parody in these songs (the Neil Young guitars in "Finally Getting Over" and the mention of "this place that Billy Joel sang about" in "Funeral Shoes"), in both melody and lyrics most of this music sounds sweetly bummed out enough that it could easily pass as the real thing, especially the masterful "I Don't Think About You Much Anymore." Heidecker's voice is good, not great, but his phrasing and sense of drama is superb, and his delivery points to the likes of Harry Nilsson, Steely Dan, Jackson Browne, and James Taylor as he struggles with the anger, frustration, and depression of a man suddenly alone. "When I Get Up" sounds jaunty on the surface, but it's a knowing study of the nature of depression when you take a second look. And the production and arrangements approximate the sounds of the era with a knowing skill and affection. Heidecker has walked a similar musical path on 2016's In Glendale and in his recordings with Davin Wood, but What the Brokenhearted Do is his finest album to date, moving past parody or homage into a place that comes within throwing distance of the masters of this particular sound. Heidecker's spouse may have to leave him for real if he's ever going to top this. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 24, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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Lousy with stadium concert excess, rock star foppery and the profuse heresies of disco, 70s music was once an easy target for defamers. But that much-maligned era has become a ubiquitous influence in today's fractured musical soundscape. Young guitar bands routinely gulp down Zep licks and Iommi chords, digest the relevant lessons and chunder up fresh manifestos, which in the case of heavy stoner/psych rock lords Black Mountain's fifth full length means hard, fast knots of guitar riffage, Hawkwind-esque lyrics and a devotion to the twin lyrical icons of 70's rock: cars and sex. Black Mountain founder/leader Stephen McBean recently added high octane fuel to his awe for 70's-influenced rock by learning to drive at the tender age of 48. Getting behind the wheel for the first time led to "Licensed to Drive," where he echoes Deep Purple's immortal "Highway Star," by exclaiming, "Live now / Speed thrills / Hunted by the radar / The Thunder of the Steel" while synthesizers wail with abandon. Rather than a KISS allusion, the album's title is supposedly named for a short-lived Dodge muscle car that was discontinued in 1985. With his road jones satiated he moves toward pleasures of the flesh in "High Rise": "Thrusting cement into heaven / Penetrating the clouds / Staring us down / Thinking you're all that the world spins around / The loneliest cock in the sky." Mixed by John Congelton, Destroyer is sonically compressed, in-your-face and meant to be played loud. A blunt-edged continuation of Black Mountain's evolution into intricate layering, inventive, hooky arrangements and odd touches like acoustic guitar openings and vocoder choruses, Destroyer, dedicated to "all the warriors who have left the stadium," finds new driver McBean mastering the musical wile of looking in the rearview while simultaneously keeping an artistic eye on what's ahead. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Soul - Released May 10, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music - Qobuzissime
What is my purpose? What will come of the legacy of those who have influenced me? And what will I leave behind? These are all the big questions that Jamila Woods asks herself going into her second album suitably named Legacy! Legacy!, a Qobuzissime album! Three years after the release of Heavn, the soul sister from Chicago brings together twelve songs all named after the artists that influenced them. Musicians, painters, writers, activists, poets, they’re all there! And the lucky few are: Betty Davis, Zora Neale Hurston, Nikki Giovanni, Sonia Sanchez, Frida Kahlo, Eartha Kitt, Miles Davis, Muddy Waters, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Sun Ra, Octavia Butler and James Baldwin. There is nothing obvious or didactic here as the young African-American who is ever-so attached to her native Chicago never does out-and-out covers but less subtle “in the style ofs” all while retaining her own distinct style. A poet one day (she acts as artistic director for YCA, a center dedicated to young poets) and a musician the other, she is even a teacher on bank holidays! As the worthy heir of Erykah Badu and Lauryn Hill, all her words are wrapped around ultra-slick grooves with a modernized nu-soul twist. When it comes to features, Jamila Woods helps her local economy by inviting along friends that, for the most part, come from the underground scene of the Windy City: the trumpetist Nico Segal, MC Saba, Nitty Scott, theMIND, Jasminfire. Chance the Rapper’s protégé has mixed intelligence and class, commitment, enjoyment and groove into 49 minutes. Perfect. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 26, 2019 | Jagjaguwar

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You’d expect nothing less from these two. Sam France and Jonathan Rado, the wacky duo who have come to embody the psychedelic rock scene of the late 2010s with their verbose creativity, have released their fifth record. But is it their best? It certainly is in terms of maturity. The lack-luster …And Star Power (2014) left much to be desired due to its trippy and hallucinogenic sound that appeared to rip off Todd Rundgen. The following album Hang (2017) was a vast improvement and not far off the classic We are the 21st Century Ambassadors of Peace and Magic (2013). Sam and Jonathan will soon be entering their thirties; their faces have matured along with their rock’n’roll sound. “How does it feel to be livin’ a lie” sings Sam on Livin’ a lie before he concludes “We should just be friends” on The Conclusion. The duo has aged, mixed things up, and above all, wizened.Rado has practically become an invaluable and omnipresent member of the world of indie rock: he has worked as a producer for the Lemon Twigs and has been called in for assistance by artists such as Alex Cameron and Father John Misty. He is also responsible for the production of Weyes Blood’s impressive Titanic Rising. With such a résumé Rado is, indeed, indispensable. With Seeing Other People, the duo displays an eighties rock-funk sound, like MGMT had done with Little Dark Age; an arsenal of synths (Face the Facts), a new voice (that of a weathered seducer on Mona) and their own new sense of orchestration (Livin’ a lie). The melodies, while less forceful, are more complex and richer. One wonders what they will achieve in their forties. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz