Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

CD$10.49

Dance - Released July 27, 2018 | Interscope

CD$10.49

Pop - Released June 15, 2015 | Interscope

CD$10.49

Pop - Released May 18, 2015 | Interscope

CD$7.49

Pop - Released March 16, 2015 | Interscope

CD$7.49

Pop - Released January 27, 2015 | Interscope

CD$7.49

Dance - Released April 8, 2014 | Interscope

CD$8.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Interscope

CD$12.99

Dance - Released January 1, 2012 | Interscope

In the span of a few years, Anton Zaslavski was inspired by Justice to make electronic dance music, reached out to Skrillex and remixed "Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites," became an in-demand producer of remixes and original material, and signed to mainstream label Interscope. His remixes for the Black Eyed Peas and Lady Gaga, combined with production for Justin Bieber's Believe and singles like "The Anthem," "Shave It," and "Spectrum," made the German musician, still in his early twenties, a rising star in EDM and pop. Zaslavski's rapid ascent says more about his talent and creativity than the lack of skill and imagination required to make dance music. He was the drummer in a metalcore band, but he has definitely found his calling here. Clarity's lone pre-Interscope track is "Shave It," retitled "Shave It Up," made more musical with an all-strings coda, and yet shortened to a brisk 3:11. The song's grand and extended conclusion makes an early-in-the-album statement, however ostentatious, that Zaslavski can compose circles around the majority of EDM producers and do so in a concise fashion. He also knows how to construct an album. This plays out like it was developed and arranged for the sake of repeated listening rather than a quick fix for listeners in need of a rush. That said, there are plenty of peak moments that reflect the immediacy and desperation of adolescent relationships, like the stadium-ready title song (featuring Louisa Rose Allen, aka Foxes) and the fully developed modern pop of "Spectrum" (fronted in a boyish, bright-eyed manner by Matthew Koma). The instrumentals tend to be relatively restrained, but most of them are more attractive than the songs featuring big-name vocalists Ryan Tedder and Ellie Goulding. Zaslavski's not quite in a field of his own yet. "Stache" shamelessly displays the producer's indebtedness to key Justice influence Daft Punk -- it might as well be subtitled "Aerodynamic 2K12" -- but he's getting there. Anyone who appreciates well-crafted dance-pop should probably keep up with him. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
CD$11.49

Dance - Released January 1, 2012 | Interscope

CD$7.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2012 | Interscope

CD$6.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2012 | Interscope

CD$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Interscope

Just after Miami-based metal quartet Black Tide released their debut in 2008, guitarist Alex Nuñez departed, to be replaced by Austin Diaz. Along with the lineup shift, the band moved in a more distilled, commercial direction for its sophomore album. Produced by Josh Wilbur and GGGarth, 2011's Post-Mortem doesn’t have the ties to hair metal or the New Wave of British Heavy Metal that Light from Above did. Instead, it finds the group lumped in with contemporary groups like Avenged Sevenfold, Between the Buried and Me, and Bullet for My Valentine. But even if it is not as original or wildly thrashin’ as the first album, Post-Mortem is still a decent follow-up, especially considering that Black Tide are still only in their teens. © Jason Lymangrover /TiVo
CD$8.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Interscope

HI-RES$13.49
CD$11.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Interscope

Hi-Res
CD$14.99

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2010 | Interscope

Director Danny Boyle followed up his Oscar-winning Mumbai fairy tale Slumdog Millionaire with the true story of a mountain climber who saws his own arm off with a utility tool while trapped beneath a boulder in a Southern Utah canyon. While the two films couldn’t be further apart in terms of subject matter, a common thread was established by utilizing composer A.R. Rahman, who trades the Bollywood excesses of his work on Millionaire for a more subdued, atmospheric set of compositions that embrace a more Western approach. Peppered with a handful of tracks from the likes of Bill Withers, Sigur Rós, and Free Blood, Rahman's score is introduced on “The Canyon,” a sensual, string-laden daydream of a cut that echoes the vastness of the American Southwest. A suite of pieces that fall under the name “Liberation” serves as 127 Hours' backbone. Tense and largely guitar-driven, the pieces ramp up as the soundtrack nears its end, occasionally exploding into action-packed staccato cues bursting with Indian pop mysticism. The collection closes with “If I Rise,” a duet between Rahman and Dido that echoes Peter Gabriel and Sinéad O'Connor's "Blood of Eden." © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
CD$10.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Interscope

CD$12.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Interscope

CD$14.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2010 | Interscope

CD$14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released November 7, 2007 | Interscope

Everyone loves a good singalong, especially when the person leading it is Davey Havok. AFI's appearance at the Long Beach Arena in September of 2006 is chronicled on I Heard a Voice, which could well be an abbreviation for a longer title, something like, "I heard a voice -- or rather, several thousand voices singing as one." There is indeed plenty of audience participation that takes place on the album, but cheers, chants, and a chorus of fans lend themselves well to AFI's performance, enhancing the experience rather than diminishing it. Call it AFI with the Long Beach/Southern California Concert Chorus, if you will. The set list for the concert focuses mainly on songs from AFI's more recent releases, Decemberunderground and Sing the Sorrow, which on the surface would account for the crowd's enthusiasm. But it quickly becomes apparent that the fans in attendance for this show weren't just there to hear the radio-ready "Miss Murder" (though they get a rousing version of the song at the end of the show). Everyone seems to know the words to all the songs -- not only the simple choruses like, "Hey!" or "Oh!" but verses, cues, even the tones in which all of these elements are delivered. Havok not only recognizes this, he revels in it along with the fans, allowing plenty of interludes during his vocal duties in which the audience takes over. This, in addition to the occasional spoken word aside, makes for a warm, engaging and fun interplay between the people on-stage and the ones in the seats -- and the crowd is actually pretty good. That said, they won't be replacing Havok any time soon; he's certainly no slouch on this album, and delivers a performance that is earnest, theatrical, and ultimately cathartic. In other words, his vocals translate just as well live as they do in the studio. The same can't be said for all of the songs themselves, particularly several from Decemberunderground, which lose some of their magic and polish in a concert setting. It's not the fault of anyone in the band, by any means, who perform with their typical fire and enthusiasm. It's more a device of Decemberunderground's production and effects -- the songs just sound fuller on a studio release. Those who hoped for bigger, louder, arena versions of, say, "The Missing Frame" may be disappointed, but it's no reason to disregard the entire album. On the other side of the coin, however, there are times when the band seems to stick a bit too closely to the studio versions of their songs by way of minimal (if any) variations on the original sounds and themes from their previous discs. It's technically sound and makes the pieces instantly recognizable (perhaps an intentional nod to newer fans), but it cuts down a bit on the spontaneity and excitement factor that is supposed to mark a live show. Things do start to ratchet up a bit toward the end of the disc (starting with "Death of Seasons") as AFI approaches the home stretch and loosens up a bit. After some call and response with the crowd, the band brings things to a close with a version of "Miss Murder" that is looser but no less intense than the original. What makes it work is the audience, who follows Havok's every word and roars in approval with the song's completion. Their inclusion from beginning to end shows that more than anything, I Heard a Voice is a gift to the fans, who AFI thanks repeatedly throughout the disc, an acknowledgement that they are the ones that fuel the band's fire inside. © Katherine Fulton /TiVo

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released May 1, 2007 | Interscope

Download not available