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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2013 | Interscope

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It's ironic that the most recognized album of A.R. Rahman is not his best work. For many Rahman fans, Slumdog Millionaire is not exactly the sound that they attribute to him. His Bollywood successes are designed as playback songs rather than as background scores. Thus, with the additional element of vocal melodies, his past accomplishments weigh heavily in public perception of his incredible music. While it very well deserved the enthusiastic applause at the Academy Award and Golden Globe ceremonies, Slumdog Millionaire will ignite lesser fervor in someone who has followed Rahman's music closely over the past two decades. It still has the all-pervading signature sound of Rahman with its brilliant percussion, ominous electronica, and somber crooning, yet it displays a more hurried pace in contrast to his more subtle offerings, in which music serves as a colorful canvas behind beautiful vocal portraits. What's more interesting with this album is the flash of experimentation that wouldn't have been possible in a Bollywood album -- minimalist electronica with "Riots," acid jazz with "Millionaire," and big beat with "Liquid Dance." Rahman packs this album with his usual well-credited crew, including Blaaze for the hip-hop-styled "Gangsta Blues," Sukhwinder Singh for album highlight "Jai Ho," and Suzanne for the lighthearted "Latika's Theme" and "Dreams on Fire." The most talked-about addition in the list of singers here is M.I.A. She delivers exciting vocals on the opening theme "O... Saya." The album also includes an original song from M.I.A.'s Kala album, the hit "Paper Planes" (also here in a special remix), as well as the Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy composition "Aaj Ki Raat" from the film Don. The success of Slumdog Millionaire's music can be traced back to the success of the film, and while the world was late in noticing Rahman until Slumdog Millionaire remedied that situation, listeners should explore his other offerings -- both past and, one assumes, future -- that could be considered more highly deserving of accolades. © Bhasker Gupta /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 31, 2012 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2012 | Interscope

Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted, which finds the Central Park Zoo escapees joining a traveling circus and participating in animated hijinks across Europe, once again utilizes the talents of composer Hans Zimmer (Lion King, The Dark Knight) and a host of familiar pop stars to provide musical fuel for the film. Five of the thirteen tracks are Zimmer instrumentals, and while they may not be as memorable as anything from the Lion King, each piece dutifully projects the composer's mastery of the genre. Elsewhere, Katy Perry lends the soundtrack her 2010 smash hit "Firework," Australian duo Yolanda Be Cool and producer DCUP supply the collection with their international dance hit " We No Speak Americano," and the cast lend their voices to wild renditions of the Spice Girls' "Wannabe," Nelly's "Hot in Here," and of course, C+C Music Factory's "Gonna Make You Sweat (Everybody Dance Now)." © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2012 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2012 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2012 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2011 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 28, 2010 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2010 | Interscope

Director Danny Boyle followed up his Oscar-winning Mumbai fairy tale Slumdog Millionaire with the true story of a mountain climber who saws his own arm off with a utility tool while trapped beneath a boulder in a Southern Utah canyon. While the two films couldn’t be further apart in terms of subject matter, a common thread was established by utilizing composer A.R. Rahman, who trades the Bollywood excesses of his work on Millionaire for a more subdued, atmospheric set of compositions that embrace a more Western approach. Peppered with a handful of tracks from the likes of Bill Withers, Sigur Rós, and Free Blood, Rahman's score is introduced on “The Canyon,” a sensual, string-laden daydream of a cut that echoes the vastness of the American Southwest. A suite of pieces that fall under the name “Liberation” serves as 127 Hours' backbone. Tense and largely guitar-driven, the pieces ramp up as the soundtrack nears its end, occasionally exploding into action-packed staccato cues bursting with Indian pop mysticism. The collection closes with “If I Rise,” a duet between Rahman and Dido that echoes Peter Gabriel and Sinéad O'Connor's "Blood of Eden." © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released September 29, 2009 | Interscope

Distinctions 3F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are means so much to so many generations that Spike Jonze's film adaptation couldn't be just a typical kids' movie -- it had to be a movie for the entire family. And on every part of the production, Jonze worked with artists so close to him that they might as well have been a family: while bringing the book's story to the big screen, he developed a tight friendship with Sendak; for Where the Wild Things Are's music, Jonze recruited former lover and frequent collaborator Karen O of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. In turn, O drafted a who's who of indie rock talent, among them her chief co-writers Bradford Cox of Deerhunter and Yeah Yeah Yeahs associate Imaad Wasif and her bandmates Brian Chase and Nick Zinner, all of whom perform under the aptly storybook name Karen O & the Kids. With their help, O uncovers new musical directions. Wildness abounds in her work with the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Native Korean Rock, but neither band's music is particularly childlike. Here, she taps into a rainbow of youthful expression, from "All Is Love"'s pure joy to the tribal festivity of "Rumpus" to "Animal"'s feral folk, which puts O's ferocious scream in a completely different context than her other work. Yet on "Igloo" and "Sailing Home," her voice is gentler than it's been almost anywhere else -- the only other time she has sounded so soft is on "Hello Tomorrow," the song she wrote for Jonze's 2005 Nike television commercial. Likewise, despite the wealth of indie rockers on it, Where the Wild Things Are rarely sounds self-consciously indie, even on the cover of Daniel Johnston's "Worried Shoes." Cox's xylophone gives the album a dreamlike feel, particularly on "Rumpus Reprise," while Zinner's guitar is unmistakable on the excellent "Capsize," which moves from a fierce tantrum to sweeping mystery like its own self-contained story. Balancing abstract pieces with more attention-getting pop songs like the adorable "Heads Up," Where the Wild Things Are doesn't resemble a typical children's film soundtrack, although it will make a great first soundtrack for kids' music collections. Neither a straightforward score nor a collection of kid-friendly indie rock songs, it lies somewhere intriguingly in between -- and it's just as good, if not better, than the music these artists make with their main projects. © Heather Phares /TiVo

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2009 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2009 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2009 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2009 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2009 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2007 | Interscope

As soundtracks to misguided Beatles-inspired movies go, Across the Universe -- the companion piece to Julie Taymor's pseudo-psychedelic fantasmagoria extravaganza, telling the story of the '60s through the tunes of the Fab Four -- isn't too embarrassing. Certainly, it lacks the appalling tackiness of Sgt. Pepper and it's not as stuffy as All This and World War II, but avoiding these two traps isn't a very high bar to meet, and Across the Universe winds up having its own bewildering gaudy moments. Taymor's overly designed fantasia is at once too tasteful and too garish, which is an odd combination for an odd movie -- and something that may be more gripping onscreen than it is on record, where the flaws of the casting tend to be harder to ignore, at least in musical terms. Curiously enough, that's as true of the actors as it is the pro singers. It may be expected that Evan Rachel Wood is as charmless on record as she is onscreen, but it's hard to ignore how Dana Fuchs furiously channels Melissa Etheridge (especially on "Helter Skelter") to no avail when her performance is isolated as music, but the biggest surprise is that Bono not only looks like a dead ringer for Robin Williams in the film, but he sounds a bit like him too, as he gracelessly slaughters "I Am the Walrus" and "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" with his dogged, overly earnest readings. Bono may have no ear for whimsy, but his brave literalism in the face of nonsense fits Taymor's literal interpretations of the Beatles catalog yet it provides the soundtrack with its only fleeting moments of camp -- although T.V. Carpio's lesbian longing on "I Want to Hold Your Hand" comes close, due to its hazy, soft symphonic makeover -- as most of this slides by agreeably enough. Jim Sturgess has the same plainspoken delivery as Ewan MacGregor in Moulin Rouge, which helps in love songs from "All My Loving" to "Something" -- and he does a credible job on the rockabilly revamp of "I've Just Seen a Face" -- and Joe Cocker steals the show with his slinky, funky, spacy version of "Come Together." And, apart from Bono and Fuchs' too-strong soulful belting, nothing is distracting -- but nothing is particularly memorable as music, either, which is odd because the movie itself is certainly memorable, whether you like it or not. But that just means that Across the Universe falls prey to the curse of jukebox musicals on Broadway -- no matter how good or how bad the music is, it ultimately only whets the appetite for the original recordings, which is certainly the case here. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2007 | Interscope

Like Shaun of the Dead, Edgar Wright's Hot Fuzz has a soundtrack that is witty, well-chosen, and steeped in British rock history. Kicking off with Adam Ant's "Goody Two Shoes" and including the Crazy World of Arthur Brown's "Fire" and the Kinks' "Village Green Preservation Society," the album gathers a treasure trove of classic but not over-exposed, tracks, along with some newer ones: the Fratellis' barreling blend of punk, glam and pop sounds just as good on "Solid Gold Easy Action Town" as it did on Costello Music. However, the deeper the soundtrack digs, the better it gets: "Dance with the Devil" by legendary drummer Cozy Powell and Stavely Makepeace's throbbing instrumental "Slippery Rock 70s" sound weirdly familiar but hard to place, making them perfect musical cues for a film that goes from comedy to action to horror and back again. Likewise, the soundtrack touches on the film's police theme without being heavy-handed (no songs by the Police, for example); Supergrass' "Caught by the Fuzz" and XTC's "Sgt. Rock (Is Going to Help Me)" keep things witty and light, while Jon Spencer and the Elegant Too's heavy, funky "Here Come the Fuzz" feels equally inspired by Jimi Hendrix and the themes to '70s cop shows. Indeed, the pop songs on Hot Fuzz are so bright and brash that "Hot Fuzz Suite" -- which compiles excerpts of David Arnold's score into one 22-minute track -- sounds even darker and more intense by comparison. Moving from gentle acoustic moments to electronica, jazz and horror-inspired choral chanting, Arnold's music is accomplished and versatile, but might have had more impact on the album if it was presented as separate cues. Either way, Hot Fuzz is a very enjoyable, smart soundtrack. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2007 | Interscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2006 | Interscope

A movie starring Sarah Silverman (that silver-tongued genius who makes other female comedians blush with modesty), Bob Odenkirk, and Brian Posehn sounds like a sure-fire thing, especially with some songs written by Liam Lynch, co-creator of the genius Sifl & Olly TV show that MTV so disgracefully canceled. But the truth is, Jesus Is Magic works best when it's just Sarah on-stage alone. The songs sometimes pale when compared with the potency of Silverman's standup delivery, and the soundtrack suffers from erratic shifts in tone and momentum throughout. Sometimes the jokes don't translate well without the visuals, and then there are other moments during Silverman's standup that are just downright raunchy and effective. If you've never heard her standup before, brace yourself. This is just as blue as humor can get without being downright awful and offensive merely for the sake of being offensive. © Rob Theakston /TiVo

Film Soundtracks - Released February 3, 2004 | Interscope

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