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Classical - Released October 10, 2000 | InFiné

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Classical - Released November 17, 2003 | InFiné

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Electronic - Released November 13, 2006 | InFiné

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Techno - Released December 4, 2006 | InFiné

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Electronic - Released February 12, 2007 | InFiné

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Don't let the title of Francesco Tristano's CD deceive you, for he plays acoustic piano on all the selections, enhanced by occasional ghostly electronic background trimmings. It is not necessarily a jazz piano recording, but one where he has paid attention to the minimalist 20th and 21st century players influenced by Steve Reich. Tristano's music is also keyed into techno (modifying a tune by Autechre) and alternative rock, some ethnic elements, and pure improvisational keyboard stylings. The introductory piece, "Hello," establishes the repeat-line concept with attributions, different accents and dynamics, bouncy and soulful components, and some improvisation. "Strings of Life," an adaptation of Detroit techno pioneer Derrick May's "Strings," exploits underground phantom effects in a two-chord development that builds momentum. A rumbling free improv discourse during "Ap" features a string of mini-arpeggios, while "The Melody" shows Tristano in joyous counterintuitive play. Three selections team Tristano with the brilliant Lebanese pianist Rami Khalife (his CD Scene from Hellek is a must-buy), and they display instant rapport. Tapping the pianos inside and out during "Jeita" to start, they move into a fractured theme and then a train trip with consistent forward motion. "The Bells" is closest to Steve Reich's concept -- slow, steady, then speeding within a controlled melodic framework -- while "Hymn" takes a dramatic and boisterous turn with a sense of purpose that speeds past the Reich visage. Tristano is in many ways a sensible and somewhat predictable player, but takes sufficient risks and uses shadings of gray and blue, a bit of Latin samba as on "Two Minds One Sound," and lighthearted romanticism or delicate simplicity offering diversity beyond strict minimalism. A most enjoyable and interesting project, it should please most progressive music listeners, and serve as a credible prelude to future works. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
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Techno - Released March 5, 2007 | InFiné

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Electronic - Released June 25, 2007 | InFiné

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Classical - Released July 16, 2007 | InFiné

The piano may not be the ideal medium for capturing the expressive possibilities of Glass' style of minimalism, but pianist Bruce Brubaker selects pieces that work well on the instrument. Part of the problem with hearing Glass on the piano is forgetting the sound of his ensemble, and the variety of colors (and volume) they have imparted to similar music. Brubaker begins his recital of works by Glass and Alvin Curran with his transcription of "Knee Play 4" from Einstein on the Beach. It is in fact a lovely piece on the piano if one can put the spectacular power and tonal range of the instrumental version out of one's mind. "Opening" from Glassworks, originally scored for piano, works beautifully on the instrument, and flows as naturally as the C major Prelude from Book I of The Well Tempered Clavier. The two pieces by Curran, Hope Street Tunnel Blues III and Inner Cities II, use a syntax similar to Glass, with a more dissonant tonal vocabulary. Hope Street Tunnel Blues III has ample kinetic energy that gives it an exhilarating momentum. At a length of 20 minutes, Inner Cities II unfolds on a much larger canvass than the Glass pieces recorded here. While it's effectively atmospheric, it doesn't have enough of a clear structural framework to hold the listener's interest, and at the end, it includes an incongruous jazz lick that seems to have no relation to the rest of the piece. Brubaker plays with obvious commitment, and with sensitivity to the nuances required to keep the music of such repetitiveness moving, even though his "Opening" doesn't match the limpid lyricism of Glass' own performance. © TiVo
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Techno - Released September 3, 2007 | InFiné

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House - Released November 12, 2007 | InFiné

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Electronic - Released February 14, 2008 | InFiné

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Electronic - Released March 10, 2008 | InFiné

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Electronic - Released May 26, 2008 | InFiné

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Techno - Released June 9, 2008 | InFiné

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House - Released September 29, 2008 | InFiné

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Ambient - Released November 3, 2008 | InFiné

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Techno - Released November 24, 2008 | InFiné

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House - Released March 1, 2009 | InFiné

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Electronic - Released April 30, 2009 | InFiné

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Electronic - Released June 8, 2009 | InFiné

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