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Rock - Released April 27, 2004 | Independiente

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Rock - Released June 7, 2009 | Independiente

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 31, 2009 | Independiente

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Pop - Released May 12, 2008 | Independiente

Previously notable for providing the sultry vocals for Tricky's trip-hop masterpiece Maxinquaye, Martina Topley-Bird became an artist in her own right with her 2003 debut, the Mercury Music Prize-nominated Quixotic. Her second release, The Blue God, is a slightly more commercial affair than its predecessor, adding a poppier edge to her usual brand of atmospheric soul, two-tone ska, and ambient chillout. Produced by Gnarls Barkley's Danger Mouse, the 2008 LP includes the singles "Carnies," "Poison," and "Baby Blue." © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 20, 2008 | Independiente

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 12, 2008 | Independiente

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Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Independiente

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Rock - Released July 9, 2007 | Independiente

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Pop - Released July 1, 2007 | Independiente

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Rock - Released May 7, 2007 | Independiente

Early in their career, Travis sounded like Oasis crossed with U2, and as the years rolled steadily on, they gradually replaced Oasis with Radiohead, without ditching that devotion U2. Travis may have cut out any of their overt rock influences, yet they retained the everyday, boys-next-door image that was so common in all the post-Britpop guitar bands, and that humility served them well on their 1999 sophomore effort, The Man Who, a commercial breakthrough that also established the soft, shimmering sound that was their signature. Unfortunately for them, not long after that album, they were eclipsed by Coldplay, another Radiohead-U2 fusion that managed to keep some sense of majesty to their music, something that Travis, sensible lads that they are, seemed to studiously avoid. In the wake of that simultaneous success and eclipse, the group survived some professional and personal struggles, taking four years to record their fifth album, 2007's The Boy with No Name. Far from being a long-gestating leap forward, The Boy with No Name offers a comfortable, familiar Travis, but there is a slight, subtle difference: the band has truly embraced their modesty, settling into their gentleness. There's a mild, untroubling weariness to their performances here that suits them quite well; it deepens the music, makes their deliberate tempos resonate, it makes the quietness feel contemplative, it even makes the cleanliness of the production feel right, a reflection of their maturity. If the melodies don't really dig in, they nevertheless float sweetly, meshing into the overall fabric and feel of the album. If the music never quite soars, it never seems as if the band is struggling in vain to achieve take-off, either. For the first time since The Man Who, Travis doesn't seem to strive to achieve something, they just exist, and their music is better for it. They're still ordinary, almost painfully so, but they don't seem pedestrian, they seem to have weathered some ups and downs, channeling that experience into an album that has a slight, yet palpable, emotional resonance that their predecessors often lacked. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 23, 2007 | Independiente

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Pop - Released March 4, 2007 | Independiente

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World - Released March 13, 2007 | Independiente

Hand it to Tinariwen. Like the nomads they are, they don't stand still musically. On their third album (the title translates as Water Is Life), they keep the root intact, the desert blues still at the heart of all they do, but this builds upon what they achieved on their superb sophomore disc, happily restless and unafraid of walking down new paths. However, although they're rightly lauded for their widescreen blues sound, what emerges most here is something they hinted at on the last record -- they're a remarkable rock & roll band, too. The guitars, locked together in rhythm and lead, create a glorious syncopated noise that puts most rockers to shame. But there's a wonderful looseness to the sound (kudos to producer Justin Adams), in part due to the fact that these tracks were all recorded over just two weeks, a tiny time frame by today's standards. Recorded in the Malian capital of Bamako, these songs arrive with dust on their boots and a little thirsty. The studio touches are subtle, a little on the effects here and there, but never detract from the music -- which even features old member Mohammed Ag Itlale, whose voice and guitar can be heard on several tracks. © Chris Nickson /TiVo
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Rock - Released December 3, 2006 | Independiente

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World - Released February 16, 2007 | Independiente

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Rock - Released October 29, 2006 | Independiente

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 15, 2006 | Independiente

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 1, 2006 | Independiente

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Country - Released September 25, 2006 | Independiente

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Rock - Released September 10, 2006 | Independiente