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Alternative & Indie - Released September 6, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Soul - Released August 30, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 28, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 23, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Punk / New Wave - Released August 16, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Country - Released August 2, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 30, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Country - Released July 28, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Soul - Released June 14, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Al Green, the master of sensual southern soul and refined groove, gives us his greatest tracks from Hi Records. Thanks to Willie Mitchell, producer and boss of this legendary Memphis label, the reverend Al Green and his sexual falsetto collates his 1968-1978 hits into this original production. There is a constant battle between the temptation of the flesh and religious self-denial throughout, and Al Green remains firmly between the soul and gospel stylings of the South and the luxurious Philly sound. His voice is spellbindingly erotic, and is carried by the production of Mitchell, the backbone of many of his albums.With restrained metronomic drums, big brass and subdued guitar playing, no one else can reach such a level of profound sensuality through the simplicity of I'm Still in Love With You or Let's Stay Together. Al Green whispers, speaks and shouts, like a soul preacher on the verge of committing sin. In 1974, he was even severely burnt while in the bath by his girlfriend who committed suicide a few minutes later. Green took this as a “sign from God” and became a pastor two years later. "I learned more stuff in church than I did in the world.” This collection brings together all the remastered singles from his twelve albums for Hi Records, and only helps us understand his genius further. You can’t help but still be impressed by the magical combination of this unique voice and the muted music that stands the test of time. Essential listening. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released June 7, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Punk / New Wave - Released May 24, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 10, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Rock - Released May 3, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 17, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 12, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 12, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 22, 2019 | Fat Possum

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Country - Released March 7, 2019 | Fat Possum

Like his hero Hank Williams, Townes Van Zandt died on January 1. On the first day of 1997, he lost his life to alcohol at 52 years old. Throughout his career, the darkest of all Texan songwriters found his inspiration in the depth of human misery, mental pain, and physical despair. Both cynical and lucid, with a singular and refined style, he always stood as an outlaw in the history of country music. He could juggle with words (death, jail, friendship, alcohol, love) and build his Tower of Babel of despair with a hint of cynicism and humor.  With Sky Blue, released in early 2019, Townes Van Zandt is sending a postcard from heaven. Put together by his family (his widow Jeanene and his children J.T., Will, and Katie Bell), the album features eleven previously unreleased tracks recorded in 1973 by Bill Hedgepeth, a journalist, musician, and friend of Van Zandt. At that time, Van Zandt was living between Texas, Colorado, and a cabin in Franklin, Tennessee. His life was nomadic, and he described his lifestyle in his songs. Often along his travels, Van Zandt stopped to see his friend Hedgepeth in his home studio in Atlanta. There, he recorded songs, worked on older tracks, and sometimes experimented new sounds. All of this is memorialized in Sky Blue. The record features first drafts of classics (Pancho & Lefty and Rex’s Blues, where Van Zandt shines as a master composer and a writer whose simple words and melodies favor his ideas and emotions), and inspired covers of Richard Dobson and Tom Paxton’s song, as well as The Hills of Roane County, a murder ballad from 1880. As the icing of this beautiful cake, the record will please all fans with two unreleased songs: All I Need and Sky Blue. The album is more than enough to remind everyone of the crucial importance of Townes Van Zandt’s legacy… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 1, 2019 | Fat Possum

When Royal Trux's late-2010s reunion led them into the studio to make new music, there was a small hope that Neil Hagerty and Jennifer Herrema might go even further with the freewheeling experiments that have been missing from indie rock since they disbanded in 2001. Instead, for better or worse, White Stuff sounds like an amalgam of Accelerator, Veterans of Disorder, and Pound for Pound. On the bright side, the combination of Hagerty's scorched riffs and Herrema's perma-growl remains potent on "Purple Audacity #2," a song so foggily funky it should come with its own dry ice machine, and they still sound great shouting in not-quite unison on the title track and "Year of the Dog." However, as close as White Stuff gets to the classic Royal Trux sound, it feels like some of the spirit behind that sound is missing. Back in the day, Herrema and Hagerty's frayed, acid-washed combination of metal, pop, funk, classic rock, and whatever else they wanted generated sparks as it threatened to fall apart; this time, it seems surprisingly careful. White Stuff's hi-def digital production is even cleaner than the band's output for Virgin Records, and its songs include every vintage Trux quirk, like bongos and electric piano, with almost algorithmic attention to detail. Just when things start feeling too predictable, White Stuff's second half brings back some of the looseness, weirdness, and humor that earned Royal Trux their cult following. Kool Keith adds some welcome energy to "Get Used to This," creating a more spontaneous mood that "Whopper Dave" continues. "Every Day Swan" could pass for a track that fell off of Veterans of Disorder, thanks to its cowbell-heavy, seemingly effortless appeal -- and serves as a reminder that this kind of offhanded charm doesn't always come easily, even to this band. While fans of Royal Trux's inventiveness might find more of that in Hagerty's and Herrema's solo work, White Stuff is still another entertaining part of a reunion that once seemed impossible. ~ Heather Phares
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 22, 2019 | Fat Possum