Categories :

Albums

CD$18.99

Ambient - Released January 1, 2005 | EG Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
When listening to Music For Airports for the first time, fans of the glam-Brian Eno from the Roxy Music period and his album Here Come The Warm Jets must have been blown away… Goodbye bowiesque sounds, hello the experiments of Terry Riley, Steve Reich, John Cage, LaMonte Young and other wisemen who were mad about minimalist music. In 1978, Eno (ahead of his time) conceived four long tracks of instrumental music each over 10 minutes long. Sounding like movies soundtracks, these explorations to the borders of new age and these climatic developments of an astonishing sensuality prefigure an entire part of what the electronic music will sound like a few years later, and ambient music in particular. All that’s left is to listen to the atmospheric masterpieces in airports… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
CD$10.49

Ambient - Released January 1, 2004 | EG Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
When listening to Music For Airports for the first time, fans of the glam-Brian Eno from the Roxy Music period and his album Here Come The Warm Jets must have been blown away… Goodbye bowiesque sounds, hello the experiments of Terry Riley, Steve Reich, John Cage, LaMonte Young and other wisemen who were mad about minimalist music. In 1978, Eno (ahead of his time) conceived four long tracks of instrumental music each over 10 minutes long. Sounding like movies soundtracks, these explorations to the borders of new age and these climatic developments of an astonishing sensuality prefigure an entire part of what the electronic music will sound like a few years later, and ambient music in particular. All that’s left is to listen to the atmospheric masterpieces in airports… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2001 | EG Records

Released to herald a reunion of the band and superseding several out-of-print predecessors, The Best of Roxy Music is an excellent summary of the group's hits and album highlights between 1972 and 1982. There are really two editions of Roxy Music, the glam rock unit that achieved widespread U.K. success from 1972 to 1975, and the more polished one that was a broader international success from 1979 to 1982. The compilers have dealt with the dichotomy and the more lasting popularity of the later recordings by presenting the compilation in reverse chronological order, so that soft rock hits like "Over You" and "Dance Away," which scored in America, come before U.K.-only hits like "Street Life" and "Virginia Plain," which rock much harder. But all the major hits are here (only a couple of less-successful British singles chart entries are missing), augmented by memorable album tracks like "Do the Strand" and "Mother of Pearl." In print or not, this is the best single-disc collection of Roxy Music, since it is more complete than earlier compilations like the 1977 Greatest Hits and 1983 The Atlantic Years (1973-1980) LPs, and, unlike later best-ofs such as Street Life: 20 Great Hits (1986), The Ultimate Collection (1988), and More Than This: The Best of Bryan Ferry and Roxy Music (1995) (the latter two U.K. releases), it is not divided between Bryan Ferry solo tracks and Roxy Music ones. ~ William Ruhlmann
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1999 | EG Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Flesh + Blood suggested that Roxy Music were at the end of the line, but they regrouped and recorded the lovely Avalon, one of their finest albums. Certainly, the lush, elegant soundscapes of Avalon are far removed from the edgy avant-pop of their early records, yet it represents another landmark in their career. With its stylish, romantic washes of synthesizers and Bryan Ferry's elegant, seductive croon, Avalon simultaneously functioned as sophisticated make-out music for yuppies and as the maturation of synth pop. Ferry was never this romantic or seductive, either with Roxy or as a solo artist, and Avalon shimmers with elegance in both its music and its lyrics. "More Than This," "Take a Chance with Me," "While My Heart Is Still Beating," and the title track are immaculately crafted and subtle songs, where the shifting synthesizers and murmured vocals gradually reveal the melodies. It's a rich, textured album and a graceful way to end the band's career. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1999 | EG Records

Recorded live in France in 1982 but not released on CD in the U.S. until 1990, Heart Still Beating isn't quite in a class with Roxy Music's first live album, Viva, but nonetheless gives us a lot to be excited about. Lead singer Bryan Ferry and guitarist Phil Manzanera sound quite inspired much of the time, and Manzanera delivers some excellent solos. Longtime Roxy devotees will want to savor engaging versions of "Out of the Blue" and "Both Ends Burning" (both of which were heard on Viva), as well as such favorites as "Dance Away," "Avalon" and the clever "Love Is the Drug." Roxy comes closer to a mainstream rock sound on enjoyable interpretations of Neil Young's "Like a Hurricane" and John Lennon's "Jealous Guy," but even then, the distinctive band's quirky art-rock tendencies remain. ~ Alex Henderson
CD$8.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1999 | EG Records

When Jerry Hall, front-cover model on Roxy's Siren, left Ferry for Mick Jagger, his response was this interesting album, not a full success but by no means a washout. In part Ferry returned to the model of his solo work before In Your Mind, with half the tracks being covers of rock and soul classics. Thus, Sam and Dave's "Hold On (I'm Coming)," Al Green's "Take Me to the River" (which arguably sounds like a strong influence on Talking Heads' near contemporaneous version) and even the Velvet Underground's "What Goes On," among others, take a bow. Unfortunately Ferry's backing performers, mostly drawing on studio pros like Waddy Wachtel, don't seem to have the real affinity for the material like his earlier solo-effort cohorts did. If anything, though, there's also the sense of Ferry channeling his romantic gloom through a number of the songs, giving them a strong personal bite. The guitar and bass-only version of the traditional folk tune "Carrickfergus" works best of all, its lovelorn sentiments and slow pace connecting just right. As for Ferry's originals, his sentiments are all the more clear, right from the abbreviated charge of the opening "Sign of the Times," its fractured sentiments of disturbed, vicious romance matched by the clipped punch of the music and Ferry's own brisk delivery. The other originals don't cut quite so bloodily, but the sense of loss and confusion is all there, from the opening line "Well I rush out blazin'/My pulse is racin'" on "Can't Let Go" to the lonely sense of mystery on "This Island Earth," the album's conclusion. ~ Ned Raggett
CD$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1999 | EG Records

With Roxy Music set aside for the time being, Ferry took the solo plunge with an album of totally original material. As such, the underrated In Your Mind makes a logical follow-on from Roxy's Siren, especially since usual suspects -- Thompson, Manzanera, Wetton, and many more -- assist him in the brief eight-song effort. While lacking early Roxy's long-gone freakouts In Your Mind still burns more fiercely than both the later solo and group albums, at least on certain tracks - like Siren, it balances between rockier and smoother paths, most often favoring the former. Ferry's lyrics remain in his own realm of intelligent, romantic dissipation, and are some of his best efforts. The strong opener "This Is Tomorrow" starts with Ferry and keyboards before moving into a big, chugging full band arrangement and a wistful chorus: "This is tomorrow callin'/Wish you were here." When Ferry aims for a calmer mood, rather than stripped-down melancholia, he lets everyone play along. Sometimes the arrangements almost swamp the songs, but "One Kiss'" combination of female backing vocals, sax, and straight-up rock for instance, make it a great woozy, end-of-the-night singalong before the bars close. There are a few blatant misfires -- "Tokyo Joe" has the chugging, dark funk/rock beat down cold, but the lyrics play around too much with Asian stereotypes (and let's not mention the opening gong and all too obvious attempts at "atmosphere" via the strings). On balance, though, In Your Mind remains the secret highlight of Ferry's musical career, an energetic album that would have received far more attention as a full Roxy release. ~ Ned Raggett
CD$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1996 | EG Records

CD$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1987 | EG Records

Drummer Bill Bruford made a name for himself in the '70s as a rock & roller of a progressive bent. In the '80s he formed the rather extraordinary jazz/fusion band that became Earthworks -- Bruford, saxophonist Iain Ballamy, keyboard and brass virtuoso Django Bates, and bassist Mick Hutton. This was their first album; an interesting one it was, though a later, live recording of the band presented some of the same material in a more highly developed state, rendering this original somewhat irrelevant. Bruford is a stiff-wristed player -- not a particularly subtle percussionist, though his compositional skills are apparently of a high quality (most of the tunes are co-written with other band members, so it's hard to know how much credit to give Bruford). The best thing about this band is its refreshing ingenuousness; they make intelligent, sophisticated instrumental pop music that doesn't pander in the least. This is their art, and a fine art it is. ~ Chris Kelsey

Rock - Released January 1, 1986 | EG Records

Download not available
It may seem that the same Best of Roxy Music & Bryan Ferry keeps being reissued under different names, first Street Life in 1986 and then More Than This in 1999, because in a way it is. More Than This shares no less than 15 tracks with the 20-track Street Life. Instead of giving time to the great, arty side of Roxy Music, it concentrates on Bryan Ferry the crooner, which means "Pyjamarama" and "Do the Strand" are no longer here, but such latter-day solo cuts as "Don't Stop the Dance," "Kiss and Tell," and "I Put a Spell on You" (all not on Street Life) are, along with "I'm in the Mood for Love," a "preview" of his standards album As Time Goes By, which was released just a week after More Than This. All this track shuffling doesn't result in a radically different collection, though it is one that is slightly worse than its predecessor, since it doesn't really do Roxy justice. If it had been assembled as a collection of Ferry's solo material, it might have been a little more useful (then again, the casual fan who would buy a collection of Ferry hits would probably want the latter-day Roxy singles, since Ferry just didn't have that many hits on his own), but as it stands, More Than This is just an acceptable, entertaining sampler. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1986 | EG Records

When you're a drummer playing behind the vocal heights of Jon Anderson, the guitar virtuosity of Steve Howe, or the keyboard genius of Rick Wakeman, you may expect to be disregarded from time to time. Aside from die-hard fans of Yes or King Crimson, Bill Bruford's drumming is taken for granted more often than not, when in fact he's one of the finest rock drummers to emerge from the era. Master Strokes: 1978-1985 is a well-assembled compilation of some of Bruford's best drum work, spanning numerous styles and examples of percussive artistry. All 14 tracks explore the many sides of Bruford's repertoire, delving into jazz fusion, straightforward rock, and progressive rock, and laying out some entertaining examples of how much fire the drums can truly muster, not only in their bombastic state, but also as an accompaniment to other instruments and rhythms as well. Taking tracks from Feels Good to Me, One of a Kind, and Gradually Going Tornado, this collection stands as one of the best offerings of his solo work; from the attitude-laden "Hells Bells" to the steady flow of "Travels With Myself and Someone Else" to the imaginative "Fainting in Coils," every aspect of Bruford's percussive talents are covered. "The Drum Also Waltzes" and "Gothic 17" are two of the best out-of-the-ordinary cuts, exhibiting both hard and soft styles of drumming and cymbal playing. Presenting twice as many tracks as The Bruford Tapes, Master Strokes: 1978-1985 makes for the best one-stop for those who want to hear Bruford playing to his own ideas, tempos, and genres. ~ Mike DeGagne
CD$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1986 | EG Records

CD$10.49

Pop - Released January 1, 1985 | EG Records

Roger Eno's first album continues in the vein of the songs he wrote for Apollo: Atmospheres and Soundtracks. Using piano and broad washes of synths, some treated by older brother Brian Eno, the younger Eno's pieces are slow, contemplative works of minimalism, similar to Erik Satie's "Gymnopedies." Yet the composer he is most similar to on Voices is labelmate Harold Budd, who also paints from the same palette. Daniel Lanois's production simply balances these elements and gives them depth, adding violin to the final track almost as a taste for Eno's next album. ~ Ted Mills
CD$8.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1985 | EG Records

3 Stars - Good
CD$14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 1984 | EG Records

CD$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1981 | EG Records

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
One might be forgiven for mistaking the Lounge Lizards' debut album for a traditional jazz release at a glance, what with the two Thelonious Monk covers and the participation of producer Teo Macero (who had previously worked with such heavyweights as Miles Davis, Dave Brubeck and Ella Fitzgerald, to name just a few). No, while there's definitely great respect shown here for the jazz tradition, the members are obviously coming at it from different backgrounds -- most especially guitarist Arto Lindsay, whose occasional atonal string scraping owes far more to his experience in New York City's no wave scene than to quote unquote traditional jazz. In fact, the two aforementioned Monk covers seem a strange choice when you actually hear the band, which has more in common with sonic experimentalists like Ornette Coleman or Sun Ra. That's not to say that this is too experimental; saxophonist and lead Lizard John Lurie knows when to blow noise and when to blow melody, and ex-Feelies drummer Anton Fier manages to infuse a good rock feel into the drum parts even when he's playing incredibly complex rhythms. The end result is a album that neatly straddle both worlds, whether it's the noir-ish "Incident on South Street," the art-funk of "Do the Wrong Thing," or the thrash-bebop found in "Wangling"." ~ Sean Carruthers
CD$12.99

Rock - Released March 16, 1979 | EG Records

Returning to action after four years of solo projects, Roxy Music redefined its sound and agenda on Manifesto. More than ever, Roxy sounds like Bryan Ferry's backing band, as the group strips away its art rock influences, edits out the instrumental interludes in favor of concise pop songs, and adds layers of stylish disco rhythms. Although the songwriting is distressingly inconsistent, there are a number of wonderful moments on the record, particularly in the sighing "Angel Eyes" and the heartbroken "Dance Away." Still, trading sonic adventure for lush, accessible disco-pop isn't entirely satisfactory, even if it is momentarily seductive. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$7.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1978 | EG Records

The debut album from amalgamated progsters John Wetton, Bill Bruford, Eddie Jobson, and Allan Holdsworth has the edge over both Danger Money and Night After Night because of the synthesis of melody and rhythm that is inflicted through nearly every one of the eight tracks. While not as commercial sounding as Wetton's 1980s supergroup Asia, U.K. mustered up a progressive air by the use of intelligent keyboard and percussion interplay without sounding mainstream. Jobson's work with the electric violin and assorted synthesizers adds to an already profound astuteness carried by Wetton. Former Yes and Genesis drummer Bill Bruford is just as important behind the kit, making his presence felt on numbers like "Thirty Years" and "Nevermore." Without carrying the same rhythms or cadences through each song, U.K. implements some differentiation into their music, straying from the sometimes over-the-top musicianship that occurs with the gathering of such an elite bunch. The melodious finish of such tracks as "By the Light of Day" and "Alaska" showcases the overall fluency of each member, and shows no signs of any progressive tediousness that could have easily evolved. All three of U.K.'s albums are enjoyable, but the debut sports the most interest, since it spotlights their remarkable fit as a band for the first time. ~ Mike DeGagne
CD$7.49

Rock - Released August 1, 1976 | EG Records

As Roxy Music took an extended hiatus, the live album Viva! was released. Comprised of material recorded on tours from 1973, 1974, and 1975, Viva! is a tough, powerful document of Roxy at the peak of their live powers, featuring a fine cross-section of their best work. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1976 | EG Records