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Rock - Released June 24, 2016 | Eagle Rock

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Rock - Released June 3, 2016 | Eagle Rock

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Rock - Released April 22, 2016 | Eagle Rock

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Rock - Released March 18, 2016 | Eagle Rock

So enamored with the ‘70s he’s decided to revive the decade all on his own, Black Crowes guitarist Rich Robinson can certainly create a vibe by stitching together remnants of the past. Equal parts Santana, Stones, Allmans, and acoustic Zeppelin, Through a Crooked Sun meanders amiably even if the music is largely reflective, not cheerful. Like Paper, his 2004 debut, this is decidedly a players record, but where that album felt overstuffed with guitars, Through a Crooked Sun relies on textures, all unveiled at a measured, mature pace. Robinson is an affectless singer, something that undercuts the introspection of the lyrics, yet his music has color, alternating from extended interpolations of the back half of “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking” to stark, ringing folk, all punctuated by Southern rockers that ramble instead of rush. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 18, 2016 | Eagle Rock

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Rock - Released February 26, 2016 | Eagle Rock

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Rock - Released February 26, 2016 | Eagle Rock

If you listened to Paper, the first solo album by former Black Crowes guitarist Rich Robinson without knowing who it was, it'd be easy to peg that it's the work of a guitarist who has finally been given the chance to do whatever he wants on record. There are layers and layers of guitars on each cut, so much so that it's hard to tell exactly how many overdubs are on each track, and they're all pushed to the front of the mix. Even when there isn't a specific guitar solo, each guitar part is busy enough to show off the guitarist's considerable chops, and each tune has been written to give him plenty of room to roam. It's not like Rich Robinson was ever held back in the Black Crowes -- from their first album his playing was as much a part of their sound as his brother Chris' voice, but here he's allowed to indulge himself to a far greater extent than before, and he seizes it. If you're a guitar nut, that's not a bad thing, since Robinson is a good guitarist, but he would have benefited from a producer to reign him in a bit, or at least edit his performances so they pack a punch instead of just ramble on. He also would have benefited if he had hired a vocalist; he's written a couple of hooky, vaguely psychedelic choruses, but his voice is too thin to carry over the dense, murky layers of guitars. In short, it seems like the first solo album from a talented guitarist from a notable band -- some good riffs, some good hooks, some good playing, but it never gels, since the guitarist is having too much fun enjoying his freedom to figure out how to present it to a larger audience, even an audience of his diehard fans. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 23, 2015 | Eagle Rock

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Rock - Released October 23, 2015 | Eagle Rock

The Allman Brothers came first, but Lynyrd Skynyrd epitomized Southern rock. The Allmans were exceptionally gifted musicians, as much bluesmen as rockers. Skynyrd was nothing but rockers, and they were Southern rockers to the bone. This didn't just mean that they were rednecks, but that they brought it all together -- the blues, country, garage rock, Southern poetry -- in a way that sounded more like the South than even the Allmans. And a large portion of that derives from their hard, lean edge, which was nowhere more apparent than on their debut album, Pronounced Leh-Nerd Skin-Nerd. Produced by Al Kooper, there are few records that sound this raw and uncompromising, especially records by debut bands. Then again, few bands sound this confident and fully formed with their first record. Perhaps the record is stronger because it's only eight songs, so there isn't a wasted moment, but that doesn't discount the sheer strength of each song. Consider the opening juxtaposition of the rollicking "I Ain't the One" with the heartbreaking "Tuesday's Gone." Two songs couldn't be more opposed, yet Skynyrd sounds equally convincing on both. If that's all the record did, it would still be fondly regarded, but it wouldn't have been influential. The genius of Skynyrd is that they un-self-consciously blended album-oriented hard rock, blues, country, and garage rock, turning it all into a distinctive sound that sounds familiar but thoroughly unique. On top of that, there's the highly individual voice of Ronnie Van Zant, a songwriter who isn't afraid to be nakedly sentimental, spin tales of the South, or to twist macho conventions with humor. And, lest we forget, while he does this, the band rocks like a motherf*cker. It's the birth of a great band that birthed an entire genre with this album. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 18, 2015 | Eagle Rock

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Humour - Released September 18, 2015 | Eagle Rock

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World - Released September 11, 2015 | Eagle Rock

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Rock - Released September 11, 2015 | Eagle Rock

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Rock - Released June 15, 2015 | Eagle Rock

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Rock - Released June 2, 2015 | Eagle Rock

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Rock - Released June 1, 2015 | Eagle Rock

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Pop - Released March 30, 2015 | Eagle Rock

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Rock - Released January 1, 2015 | Eagle Rock

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Rock - Released January 1, 2015 | Eagle Rock

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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Eagle Rock

A wildly successful band in their own right, Toto helped shaped the sound of pop music in the '70s and '80s not just with their own songs, but as studio musicians for Boz Scaggs, Steely Dan, and Michael Jackson. Celebrating their 35th anniversary, the band that served as the backbone for some of the smoothest pop hits of their day take Europe by storm on 35th Anniversary Tour: Live in Poland. Playing to a massive, standing-room-only crowd in Lodz, Poland, a lineup featuring Steve Lukather, Steve Porcaro, David Paich, and Joseph Williams take to the stage to deliver a stellar performance for their ecstatic European fans. Featuring hits like "Africa," "Rosanna," and a rousing rendition of "Hold the Line," this live set does their old material justice, and will be a welcome addition to the collection of any die-hard Toto fan. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo