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Classical - To be released March 20, 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - To be released February 21, 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released February 7, 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Electronic/Dance - Released January 31, 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 24, 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 24, 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 10, 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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20 years old and a brazen amount of talent: the Afro-British cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason has three idols. Cellists Jacqueline du Pré and Mstislav Rostropovitch and reggae legend Bob Marley, three passionate and extrovert forces. His career really took off after he performed at Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding in 2018. His album Inspiration released the same year broke all sorts of sales records in the United Kingdom and his hometown of Nottingham even named a bus after him. As part of a partnership with the label Decca, he is back with a new recording, this time dedicated to the famous Cello Concerto in E Minor, Op. 85, accompanied by the London Symphony Orchestra headed by their new conductor, Sir Simon Rattle. A first class encounter which produces a poetic vision, almost like chamber music, of this renowned concerto. Made famous by Jacqueline du Pré’s versions (with Barbirolli then with her husband Daniel Barenboim), Elgar’s Concerto is accompanied on the track listing by other shorter pieces which were popular among soloists and music lovers alike a century ago, which the younger generation is bringing back in vogue. The album features arrangements of traditional music and works by Bloch, Elgar, Bridge, Fauré and Klengel. From the infinitely large to the infinitely small with the staggering virtuosity of this bright young talent. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 3, 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 3, 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released November 15, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Solo Piano - Released October 18, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
This release, issued to mark the 75th birthday of the great pianist Nelson Freire in 2019, is hardly a typical album of encores. A good deal of it is devoted to a single composer, Edvard Grieg. Other composers are represented by multiple works, and there are substantial pieces like the Rachmaninov Prelude in B minor, Op. 32, No. 10, that would not fill the role of encore well. You might take the word "encore" in another way, though: to mean things reprised. Many of these pieces are ones Freire knows well, has played many times, and has explored at a truly breathtaking level of detail. The Grieg Lyric Pieces are not virtuoso works, and indeed are often played by amateurs, but you haven't heard them played like Freire plays them, with each one a little study in phrasing and register. You could sample almost anywhere here, but try the first of the Shostakovich Fantastic Dances, Op. 5, which has an entrancing subtlety from the very first notes. Freire, a famed virtuoso, mostly avoids showpieces here, but, as if to say he hasn't lost the ability, he does drop some in. The album is, then, an encore to Freire's remarkable career, which isn't over yet.
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Symphonic Music - Released September 13, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 de Diapason
the past three years, the Montreal Symphony Orchestra (a huge contributor to the Decca label since Charles Dutoit’s lead from 1977-2002) and Kent Nagano have been making an exciting series of recordings, focusing on rare works, namely Honegger-Ibert’s L’Aiglon and Leonard Bernstein’s A Quiet Place. Today, they continue their recording journey on American terrain, with a retrospective entirely dedicated to John Adams. They had left for unknown territory with Bernstein and now they return to town to celebrate one of the popes of minimalism. While Harmonielehre, a vast triptych composed in 1985 (a humble tribute to the early 20th century with perceptible influences from Wagner, Schönberg, Sibelius and Ravel) and the exciting fanfare Short Ride in a Fast Machine composed for orchestra in 1986 have been superbly championed by Sir Simon Rattle (EMI, Birmingham, 1993) as well as Michael Tilson Thomas (San Francisco, 2010-2011), few have recorded Common Tones in Simple Time (the composer’s first work for a large orchestra written in 1979) since Edo de Waart’s recording for Nonesuch in November 1986 at Davies Symphony Hall. The piece recalls Stravinsky’s Petrushka and Kent Nagano’s fluid and gentle touch is perfectly suited to this absolutely fascinating score. Throughout the other works in the programme the American conductor is consistent with his own rather “pointillist” style. In fact, Adams is almost like a modern transcription of Seurat’s paintings. This great clarity in the harmonic superimpositions also reveals the clear influence of Berg and Webern in The Anfortas Wound and allows for new balances in the incipit of the final part of Harmonielehre (Meister Eckhardt and Quackie), one of John Adams’ most striking scores, especially since the tempos and rhythms remain measured here (unlike Michael Tilson Thomas’s interpretation), giving a stirring new version of an unmissable major work. However, the greatest highlight of this anthology is still Common Tones in Simple Time, which almost sounds like a sonic representation of Van Gogh’s Starry Night. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Symphonic Music - Released September 6, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions Diapason d'or / Arte
Leading the Lucerne Festival for two summers running, conductor Richardo Chailly has honoured composers that the musicians had never yet recorded: Igor Stravinsky in 2018, and Richard Strauss in 2019. The sumptuousness of the orchestration of the latter here affords a glittering clarity, just as much in the concertante parts as in the tutti. The writing conjures a Straussian atmosphere: a marvellously apt terrain for the Lucerne orchestra. In Zarathustra, the strings, in particular the double-basses, rumble away as under one bow, with gobsmacking precision in Von der großen Sehnsucht ("Of the Great Yearning") and Genesende ("the Convalescent"). Richard Strauss deploys a romantic counterpoint in his writing – in particular in Von den Hinterweltlern ("Of the Backworldsmen") – and the strings of Lucerne brilliantly bring his limitless lyricism to life. The following works, (Tod und Verklärung, Till Eulenspiegel and finally The Dance of the Seven Veils) bring to mind other epithets that we might apply to this perfect recording: epic majesty, burlesque humour, serpentine voluptuousness: all ingredients of Strauss's symphonic poems. The sound quality does justice to the beauty of the orchestra, and the mix doesn't leave anyone out: every counterpoint is defined, every pizzicato twangs appropriately and we hear even the softest touch of the timbal. Demanding in their extremity (in both nuance and difficulty), these scores make a perfect fit for the Lucerne orchestra, a meeting of the greatest soloists of the international stage, brought together by the festival. The only drawback comes from precisely this concentration of quality. While we are gripped by Salome's Dance of the Seven Veils, we are perhaps more impressed than moved by a piece that has been stripped of some of its finest orchestral ornamentation. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Symphonic Music - Released August 30, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Studio recordings are rare things today. Orchestras are of such great quality that publishers prefer live recordings, which are much cheaper than long studio sessions, with their complex production workloads. And so this is a rather "old-fashioned" (it's fashionable) publication here from Decca, directed by Smyon Bychkov, a conductor who has rarely appeared on records for some years. Born in the Soviet Union in 1952, Semyon Bychkov was destined for a fine career in his country when, at the age of 21, he was offered the opportunity to replace the titan Mravinski at the head of the Leningrad (today St Petersburg) Philharmonic Orchestra. But his contract was cancelled because of his political opinions: a move that obliged him to seek refuge in the USA, where his career truly began in earnest. Obtaining US nationality, he became the director of the Paris Orchestra for ten years, before accepting a similar post at the head of the WDR Cologne Radio Orchestra. Named the resident at the prestigious Czech Philharmonia following the premature death of its leader Jiří Bělohlávek, Semyon Bychkov started work on this anthology of Tchaikovsky's symphonic works, including the six symphonies, the rare and little-loved "Manfred" Symphony (in its original, uncut version, including the harmonium stipulated by the conductor), the piano concertos and the Serenade for strings. This was marathon job taken at a record-breaking sprint between 2015 and 2019. In the course of this project, the Russian conductor undertook minute work on the scores and studying the personal history of the composer, in particular around the Pathétique Symphony. For him, it wasn't a requiem to Tchaikovsky, but rather a "revolt against death and not the idea of death itself". As for the famous First Concerto, played here by Kirill Gerstein, he presents the more intimate original version, which is less emphatic than the one we are used to hearing. A fine piece of work with what Bychkov has described as an ideal orchestra, which mixes the highest expression of the Slavic spirit with a Western spirit: a synthesis which sums up Tchaikovsky's music itself. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released June 14, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Cinema Music - Released June 7, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
What a pleasure it is to return to Riccardo Chailly, at the head of the Filarmonica della Scala, with a collection on Rota (1911-1979) and more particularly his songs written for the great films of Fellini such as Amarcord, Huit et Demi, and La Dolce Vita! Before him, another Riccardo, Muti, had dedicated, in the 1990s, two albums with Sony Classical to the film scores of the Italian composer – with one collection on his non-cinematographic corpus. Whether Rota’s music was for cinema or the concert hall was of little importance as he rolled out, to the likes of Bernard Herrmann in the United States, a style that was true to himself where one feels his genius and prowess for evoking ambiance mixed with an incredible dexterity for the most diverse genres, as can be heard in Suite taken here from La Dolce Vita. The beginning (O Venezia, Venaga, Venusia) of the following Il Casanova di Federico Fellini, in which the chiming of the pendulum evokes the tragic destiny of the character and the harmonization of somber colors creates a sea-like atmosphere, remains without a doubt one of the most striking tracks on the album. This ambiance returns in the final part, this time all the more mind-blowing (The Dancing Doll). Often influences from the East, of Chostakovitch and Khachaturian (Il Duca di Württenberg), can be heard along with more meridian styles inherited from Italian symphonists from the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. A passionate album not to be missed. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Lieder (German) - Released May 31, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Qobuzissime
Born in a small Norwegian village in 1987 (and is thus inevitably compared to her long-time compatriot Kirsten Flagstad), soprano Lise Davidsen was almost built to embody Wagnerian and Straussian heroines. For her first record under the label Decca, with whom she has signed an exclusive contract, she has chosen to present several facets of femininity in the vocal stylings of Elisabeth (Tannhäuser), Ariane (Ariane à Naxos) and… Pauline. Pauline being Richard Strauss’ beloved wife to whom he dedicated many Lieder from his opus 27 - the 1894 cycle offered to his wife as a wedding gift - until the last Vier letzte Lieder in 1948.Under the supple baton of Esa-Pekka Salonen, the Philharmonic Orchestra embraces the brassy voice of the Norwegian soprano with finesse and elegance. As you will see, this record, with its carefully devised programme, oscillates between youth and old age, in the presence of ghosts and death. You may wonder how one can express mortality at just 30 years old with such a powerful timbre, radiant health and a whole life ahead of you. The answer lies in Lise Davidsen’s voice, which upsurges as if it were a promise of immortality, the music of the last Strauss piece returning one last time to its past, to a Europe in ruins.Discovered in 1984, after the death of the singer and dedicatee Maria Jeritza, Malven (“The Mallows") is Richard Strauss’ true “last song”. Lighter in tone than the Vier letzte Lieder to which it might have belonged, it is presented here in an orchestration by Wolfgang Rihm. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 17, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Hilary Hahn never stops pushing the boundaries of classical music. An accomplished virtuoso and talented chamber musician, the American violinist plays the entire violin repertoire from Bach all the way up to the present day, including the classical and romantic period. Most of all, she likes to excite interest around new works and already commissioned a series of small pieces from twenty-seven composers. Then she went a step further and asked the Spanish composer Antón García Abril to compose a sequence of 6 Partitas for solo violin inspired loosely by J.S. Bach’s Six Sonatas and Partitas.Already feeling very confident about García Abril’s work, the violinist was surprised to find that the music completely exceeded her expectations. She found this new body of work “inspiring” as the phrases resonated with her and the notes flowed naturally from her fingers, “His writing for violin is compelling” says Hilary Hahn, “Fluid, emotional, clever and expressively rich”. The polyphonic writing of the Spanish composer born in 1933 is indeed marvellous in these unaccompanied pieces. García Abril has turned his back resolutely on the typical avant-garde that emerged in the post-war years and the composer’s music is tonal and full of melody, using his own rhythms. Despite the suggestion from their title, the 6 Partitas are not dance suites but rather a succession of six independent states of mind, “Heart”, “Immensity”, “Love”, “Art”, “Reflexive”, “You”, (an acronym for Hilary herself). This is more than enough to fuel the imagination and the musical repertoire of violinists from all over the world who play their “Bach”, rather predictably, for the encore of each concert. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released April 26, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Rise is the debut album from classical saxophonist Jess Gillam. Featuring a collection of classical reinterpretations of contemporary pop and rock songs, the album sees Gillam taking on originals by the likes of David Bowie and Kate Bush as well as soundtrack pieces by John Williams and Michael Nyman. ~ Rich Wilson
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Symphonic Music - Released April 26, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica