Albums

$14.99
$12.99

Rock - To be released April 12, 2019 | Concord Records

Hi-Res
$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released February 15, 2019 | Concord Records

$6.49

Rock - Released February 5, 2019 | Concord Records

Santana's debut for Concord records is pretty low key: an EP containing three new songs, along with edits of two of those tracks. It's intended as an amuse bouche before the album he recorded with Rick Rubin, but this EP contains none of Rubin's signature back-to-basics moves. Recorded with producer Narada Michael Walden, it's slick and shimmering, existing just on the margins of jazz fusion. The presence of bassist Ron Carter on "Lovers from Another Time" underscores this connection, but the EP opens with "Do You Remember Me," ten minutes of jamming that's too mellow to be called epic. Santana picks up a bit with "In Search of Mona Lisa," which bops to a Bo Diddley beat and contains the only sung narrative of the three songs. It sticks out a bit like a sore thumb compared to the grace of "Lovers from Another Time," which benefits from its glossiness, making Santana and Carter appear to glide. For this track alone, In Search of Mona Lisa is worth a listen, but the other two songs are amiable enough to not be a distraction. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$7.49
$6.49

Rock - Released February 5, 2019 | Concord Records

Hi-Res
Santana's debut for Concord records is pretty low key: an EP containing three new songs, along with edits of two of those tracks. It's intended as an amuse bouche before the album he recorded with Rick Rubin, but this EP contains none of Rubin's signature back-to-basics moves. Recorded with producer Narada Michael Walden, it's slick and shimmering, existing just on the margins of jazz fusion. The presence of bassist Ron Carter on "Lovers from Another Time" underscores this connection, but the EP opens with "Do You Remember Me," ten minutes of jamming that's too mellow to be called epic. Santana picks up a bit with "In Search of Mona Lisa," which bops to a Bo Diddley beat and contains the only sung narrative of the three songs. It sticks out a bit like a sore thumb compared to the grace of "Lovers from Another Time," which benefits from its glossiness, making Santana and Carter appear to glide. For this track alone, In Search of Mona Lisa is worth a listen, but the other two songs are amiable enough to not be a distraction. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Alternative & Indie - Released November 30, 2018 | Concord Records

Download not available
$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released October 19, 2018 | Concord Records

$16.49

Ambient/New Age - Released October 19, 2018 | Concord Records

Jazz - Released October 19, 2018 | Concord Records

Download not available
$20.99
$17.99

Rock - Released October 12, 2018 | Concord Records

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
From the release of his debut album, My Aim Is True, in 1977, Elvis Costello expressed his musical gluttony by mixing explosive pub rock, reggae tones, almost country-like ballads and pop songs sculpted with crystalline arpeggios. It was this eclecticism that allowed him to work with people as diverse as George Jones (the godfather of country music), Burt Bacharach (the master of pop lounge), the mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter, the jazz guitarist Bill Frisell, and even the rappers from The Roots, just to name a few… Forty years later, the elusive spectacled Brit (having always been fond of concept albums), releases Look Now with the Imposters, featuring Steve Nieve on keyboards, Davey Faragher on bass and Pete Thomas (already the drummer of his group Attractions). This group, with whom he recorded Momofuku in 2008, give him the chance to get his writing pen out once again… and it’s as sharp as ever. Here he has shared the writing responsibilities with the great Carole King on Burnt Sugar Is so Bitter, co-written 25 years earlier, as well as with Bacharach on Photographs Can Lie and Don't Look Now. Once again, it feels like Costello is searching for the perfect pop song. He takes an approach that screams 1960s. However, the timelessness of the album anchors the songwriter well in his time, in 2018. Costello succeeds in writing melodies and lyrics that stick in his listeners’ heads. A good song, as we all know, is ageless and Elvis Costello certainly reminds us of that here... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
$14.99

Rock - Released October 12, 2018 | Concord Records

$17.99
$14.99

Rock - Released October 12, 2018 | Concord Records

Hi-Res
expressed his musical gluttony by mixing explosive pub rock, reggae tones, almost country-like ballads and pop songs sculpted with crystalline arpeggios. It was this eclecticism that allowed him to work with people as diverse as George Jones (the godfather of country music), Burt Bacharach (the master of pop lounge), the mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter, the jazz guitarist Bill Frisell, and even the rappers from The Roots, just to name a few… Forty years later, the elusive spectacled Brit (having always been fond of concept albums), releases Look Now with the Imposters, featuring Steve Nieve on keyboards, Davey Faragher on bass and Pete Thomas (already the drummer of his group Attractions). This group, with whom he recorded Momofuku in 2008, give him the chance to get his writing pen out once again… and it’s as sharp as ever. Here he has shared the writing responsibilities with the great Carole King on Burnt Sugar Is so Bitter, co-written 25 years earlier, as well as with Bacharach on Photographs Can Lie and Don't Look Now. Once again, it feels like Costello is searching for the perfect pop song. He takes an approach that screams 1960s. However, the timelessness of the album anchors the songwriter well in his time, in 2018. Costello succeeds in writing melodies and lyrics that stick in his listeners’ heads. A good song, as we all know, is ageless and Elvis Costello certainly reminds us of that here... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
$17.99

Rock - Released October 12, 2018 | Concord Records

$17.99
$14.99

Rock - Released September 21, 2018 | Concord Records

Hi-Res
For what is supposed to be another getaway from ZZ Top (the second attempt after Perfectamundo in 2015), the first track on the album - Missin' Yo' Kissin' - sounds suspiciously like the great grandson of La Grange, ZZ Top’s absolute classic. Far from making the revolutionary technology of the Eliminator era, Gibbons is turning back his old pocket watch to the time of the most classic blues-rock. But classic does not mean old-fashioned, especially in the expert hands of this timeless rascal who would never be seen playing for a crowd of old connoisseurs. This opening song (that was written by Gilligan "Gilly" Stillwater, his wife of more than twenty-three years) is proof that he's always open to new innovation. Without using any sophisticated electronic gadgets, The Big Bad Blues is certainly contemporary. It’s hard to believe that he’s 69 years old! Gibbons has nothing to envy of the youngsters that have been flooding into the scene over the past few years. No guest performances this time, instead we find a smaller team composed of Joe Hardy (on bass, as well as co-producer of the album), Mike Flanigin (keyboards) and Greg Morrow (drums), as well as Matt Sorum, who left the Hollywood Vampires, (and also The Cult and Guns N' Roses...) occasionally on drums. Joining the next tour will be Austin Hanks (rhythm guitar) and James Harman (harmonica). As big, bad and blues as the title claims, the atmosphere is more like a "semi-dark fiesta", even on Muddy Waters' song Standing Around Crying. On this track, as on Bring It to Jerome and the classic Rollin' and Tumblin' (also by Muddy Waters), Gibbons lets himself go on his guitar for a performance which would give Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page or Eric Clapton a run for their money. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
$14.99

Rock - Released September 21, 2018 | Concord Records

Perfectamundo, the 2015 solo debut from Billy F. Gibbons, found the ZZ Top majordomo indulging in his fascination with Cuban music, which meant that it felt fundamentally different than his main gig. The same can't quite be said of Big Bad Blues, its 2018 follow-up. Working with a band featuring drummer Matt Sorum, guitarist Austin Hanks, harpist James Harman, and bassist Joe Hardy, Gibbons dives deep into blues and boogie that's been at the foundation of ZZ Top since their first album in 1971. Superficially, Gibbons is covering the same ground, but having Big Bad Blues as a busman's holiday does significantly change the feel, particularly in regards to rhythm. Sorum and Hardy provide a looser foundation than Frank Beard and Dusty Hill, which lets Gibbons slither a bit more, plus it's fun to hear him have foils in Harman and Hanks. Fun is the keystone for Big Bad Blues. Reviving a bunch of blues and R&B warhorses -- Muddy Waters' "Rollin' and Tumblin'," plus two Bo Diddley songs in "Bring It to Jerome" and "Crackin' Up" -- has inspired Gibbons to write a bunch of originals that are jumping, funny, and earthy, which find a match in "Missin' Yo' Kissin," the keynote track written by his wife Gilligan Stillwater. Unlike latter-day ZZ Top records, which are occasionally weighed down by the band's considerable legacy, Big Bad Blues feels light and free, an album that was made because Gibbons wanted to have some fun and that feeling is not only palpable, it's infectious. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 24, 2018 | Concord Records

$14.99
$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 24, 2018 | Concord Records

Hi-Res
The first studio LP since 2011's 100 Lovers -- an ambitious concert album, Live with the Colorado Symphony, arrived the following year -- This Night Falls Forever sees Devotchka delivering another expansive set that pairs sumptuous orchestral pop with elements of European folk and sweeping, stadium-ready alternative rock. Drawing from a musical arsenal that includes Theremin, guitar, bouzouki, piano, trumpet, violin, accordion, sousaphone, double bass, and flute, the Denver-based quartet casts a wide and eclectic net of sound that evokes Coldplay by way of Beirut, with a little Neon Bible-era Arcade Fire tossed in for good measure. Frontman Nick Urata has spent much of his time between Devotchka releases composing music for film and television, and that widescreen aesthetic is applied liberally throughout the LP's just-under-50-minute runtime. Opener "Straight Shot" builds slowly, unveiling layers of staccato guitar and sweeping strings with measured grace. While it never reaches the nosebleed seats -- that particular triumph is reserved for the ascendant, late-album alt-rocker "Angels" -- it's representative of the set as a whole, with the elegant single "Empty Vessels" and the operatic "Lose You in the Crowd" following suit. Urata and company have always been adept at teasing out big moments without succumbing to excess, and with the lovely This Night Falls Forever, they've distilled that predilection into something both intimate and grandiose. ~ James Christopher Monger
$12.99

Blues - Released July 27, 2018 | Concord Records

After Memphis in 2013 and A Fool To Care in 2015, Boz Scaggs concludes his trilogy on American roots music with Out of the Blues. Properly charged with southern blues and soul, here is a preview of the music that has inspired him throughout his career. With − at his side − talents such as Ray Parker, Jr. and Arc Angels’ leaders, Charlie Sexton and Doyle Bramhall II, as well as Willie Weeks (bass), Jim Keltner (drums) and Jim Cox (keyboards). Ideal conditions to bring old blues back to life… Over the nine tracks, four were composed by Jack 'Applejack' Walroth, Scaggs’ former teammate, most notably on Memphis. For the rest, the album features Don Robey’s I’ve Just Got To Forget You, Neil Young’s On The Beach, and Jimmy Read’s Down In Virginia. Boz Scaggs seems to be particularly at ease when it comes to soak in an entire era. Sixties soul is indeed a part of Those Lies, but quite modern at the same time. Some noticeable similarities with James Hunter at times, but the American singer sets himself apart thanks to his unique voice, cementing his status as a bluesman. Gritty guitars and muddy blues, the harmonica riffs unwearyingly travel back and forth America. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
$17.99
$14.99

Blues - Released July 27, 2018 | Concord Records

Hi-Res Booklet
After Memphis in 2013 and A Fool To Care in 2015, Boz Scaggs concludes his trilogy on American roots music with Out of the Blues. Properly charged with southern blues and soul, here is a preview of the music that has inspired him throughout his career. With − at his side − talents such as Ray Parker, Jr. and Arc Angels’ leaders, Charlie Sexton and Doyle Bramhall II, as well as Willie Weeks (bass), Jim Keltner (drums) and Jim Cox (keyboards). Ideal conditions to bring old blues back to life… Over the nine tracks, four were composed by Jack 'Applejack' Walroth, Scaggs’ former teammate, most notably on Memphis. For the rest, the album features Don Robey’s I’ve Just Got To Forget You, Neil Young’s On The Beach, and Jimmy Read’s Down In Virginia. Boz Scaggs seems to be particularly at ease when it comes to soak in an entire era. Sixties soul is indeed a part of Those Lies, but quite modern at the same time. Some noticeable similarities with James Hunter at times, but the American singer sets himself apart thanks to his unique voice, cementing his status as a bluesman. Gritty guitars and muddy blues, the harmonica riffs unwearyingly travel back and forth America. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
$12.99

Jazz - Released June 22, 2018 | Concord Records

$14.99
$12.99

Jazz - Released June 22, 2018 | Concord Records

Hi-Res Booklet

The Collections