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Alternative & Indie - To be released August 28, 2020 | Concord Records

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Jazz - To be released June 12, 2020 | Concord Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 29, 2020 | Concord Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 20, 2020 | Concord Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 24, 2020 | Concord Records

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Jazz - Released April 17, 2020 | Concord Records

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Rock - Released April 3, 2020 | Concord Records

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Rock - Released April 3, 2020 | Concord Records

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Jazz - Released March 27, 2020 | Concord Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 13, 2020 | Concord Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 13, 2020 | Concord Records

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R&B - Released March 6, 2020 | Concord Records

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Jazz - Released March 6, 2020 | Concord Records

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Pop - Released February 28, 2020 | Concord Records

The 39th studio album from Sergio Mendes, 2019's In the Key of Joy, is a vibrant production featuring a bevy of guest performers. The album arrived during a period of renewed activity and recognition for the Brazilian pop legend who earned his first Oscar nomination in 2012 for his song "Real in Rio" off the Rio soundtrack, and who has steadily recorded in the 2010s, issuing similarly inspired albums like 2008's Encanto, 2010's Bom Tempo, and 2014's Magic. Along with being a studio album, In the Key of Joy also arrives as a companion piece to director John Scheinfeld's documentary of the same name, detailing Mendes' life and career. As with his most recent albums, In the Key of Joy features a number of collaborations between Mendes and artists from across the musical spectrum, including rapper Common, vocalist Sugar Joans, and singer Shelea Frazier. There are also dynamic pairings with fellow Brazilian icons like guitarist/vocalist Hermeto Pascoal, Mendes' wife and longtime musical partner Gracinha Leporace, and others. Refreshingly, rather than rework his past hits, here Mendes offers newly minted songs that evoke the earthy ebullience and kinetic uplift of his classic '60s and '70s work, while also updating his sound for contemporary listeners. Thankfully, nothing is lost in the process and tracks like "Bora Lá" with singer Rogê and Leporace, "Samba in Heaven" with Joans, and "This Is It (É Isso)" with Pascoal and Leporace, retain all the funky, soulful rhythms and hooky melodies that made Mendes' seminal albums so captivating. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released February 28, 2020 | Concord Records

The 39th studio album from Sergio Mendes, 2019's In the Key of Joy, is a vibrant production featuring a bevy of guest performers. The album arrived during a period of renewed activity and recognition for the Brazilian pop legend who earned his first Oscar nomination in 2012 for his song "Real in Rio" off the Rio soundtrack, and who has steadily recorded in the 2010s, issuing similarly inspired albums like 2008's Encanto, 2010's Bom Tempo, and 2014's Magic. Along with being a studio album, In the Key of Joy also arrives as a companion piece to director John Scheinfeld's documentary of the same name, detailing Mendes' life and career. As with his most recent albums, In the Key of Joy features a number of collaborations between Mendes and artists from across the musical spectrum, including rapper Common, vocalist Sugar Joans, and singer Shelea Frazier. There are also dynamic pairings with fellow Brazilian icons like guitarist/vocalist Hermeto Pascoal, Mendes' wife and longtime musical partner Gracinha Leporace, and others. Refreshingly, rather than rework his past hits, here Mendes offers newly minted songs that evoke the earthy ebullience and kinetic uplift of his classic '60s and '70s work, while also updating his sound for contemporary listeners. Thankfully, nothing is lost in the process and tracks like "Bora Lá" with singer Rogê and Leporace, "Samba in Heaven" with Joans, and "This Is It (É Isso)" with Pascoal and Leporace, retain all the funky, soulful rhythms and hooky melodies that made Mendes' seminal albums so captivating. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop - Released February 28, 2020 | Concord Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 21, 2020 | Concord Records

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On the shoegaze-swirly "I Used to Be," Best Coast's Bethany Cosentino nails the theme of the band's fourth album: "I am not the same girl that I used to be." This is a soundtrack of rebirth, five years after the band's last release and the first since Cosentino got sober. She sounds absolutely joyous about her new life on "For the First Time" and "Everything Has Changed," where Best Coast's other half Bobb Bruno pounds out "I Love Rock 'N' Roll" drums beneath a Muffs-esque melody. Cosentino also sounds bigger and better: a fuller voice complimented with layered harmonies, as on "Different Light," which charges out of the gate with a Go-Go's punch of bright chords and surf punk drums. There's plenty of swooning romance to balance the hard-charging energy — "True" summons up 1950s prom sweetness, and the big guitar licks of "Master of My Own Mind" melt into a dreamy bridge. "I quit drinking so I could stop thinking about all the shit from years ago," Cosentino sings on "Graceless Kids." Sounds like it worked. © Shelly Ridenour / Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 21, 2020 | Concord Records

Best Coast's 2015 album California Nights was a huge sounding '90s-influenced statement that positioned the group on the verge of stadium stardom. After a five-year period of rethinking their music and personal lives, the duo return with a record that takes a less bombastic approach. Always Tomorrow is a more musically diverse record that flows from Weezer-y punk-pop ("Everything Has Changed") to smoothed-out HAIM-style pop ("For the First Time") with stops at girl group melancholy ("True") and bopping new wave ("Seeing Red") along the way. Producers Carlos de la Garza and Justin Meldal-Johnsen work with the band to sand off any remaining rough edges, which is no shock after how slick California Nights felt. At the same time, they scale back the scope of the songs overall to make it feel like a step back from bouncing around hockey arenas and instead filling a big club. It's a less ambitious, slightly more intimate approach that fits more with the very personal lyrics that detail Bethany Cosentino's recovery and self-care process. She quit a few vices in the years between recordings and shifted around some priorities too; she's not shy about detailing the fine points of the changes she's been through. At length. Over and over and over again. In fact, every song covers the same ground of confession and contrition with a fine-toothed comb. So much so that about halfway through the record, it gets to be too much. No amount of hooky guitar breaks from Bobb Bruno or fist-pumping choruses or cheerfully familiar chord progressions are enough to distract from the numbing sameness of the lyrical content. The only way it might have worked is if the music was thrilling in some way -- it isn't -- or if Cosentino ever dropped the slacker drawl vocal style she uses to deliver each self-obsessed observation. There are a few spots where she actually breaks through and does some singing that sounds like there's real emotion driving it, like on "Make It Last." More often than not, she buries her more expressive voice in the background, which helps contribute to the weird muted feeling much of the album has. It's not all bad; some songs like the moody "Used to Be," which feels like a continuation of California Nights' sound, or "Rollercoaster," which sports a fun baggy groove, point in a positive direction. Mostly, though, the album is a little too close to boring to make it worth more than half a spin. Maybe broken into a series of singles or a couple of EPs it would have been more palatable, but in this form it's just too samey and underwhelming to make much of an impression. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Pop - Released February 14, 2020 | Concord Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 5, 2020 | Concord Records

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