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Blues - To be released April 10, 2020 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Rock - Released March 27, 2020 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Rock - Released March 6, 2020 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Rock - Released February 7, 2020 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Pop - Released January 31, 2020 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Rock - Released January 17, 2020 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Pop - Released December 27, 2019 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Pop - Released November 22, 2019 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Pop - Released November 15, 2019 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Pop - Released November 1, 2019 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Pop - Released October 4, 2019 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Rock - Released October 4, 2019 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Lounge - Released June 14, 2019 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Pop - Released June 14, 2019 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Metal - Released March 22, 2019 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Issued just a few years shy of their 40th year in existence, the massive 35-song compilation Warheads on Foreheads draws from every era of Megadeth's twisting but always menacing tenure. The tracks were hand-selected by bandleader Dave Mustaine, cherrypicking stand-out selections from each of their 15 studio albums (as well as a few outlier tracks) and presenting them in chronological order. Beginning with three of the stronger songs from 1985's Killing Is My Business... And Business Is Good, Mustaine charts Megadeth's progression through their string of classic thrashy '80s albums into the more accessible sounds and heightened production of their early-'90s work. Things taper off after that, with only one or two picks from most of the band's 2000s and 2010s albums like The System Has Failed, Endgame, and Super Collider. 2016's Dystopia has more of a showing, with the inclusion of four of its better songs. The flow of this massive collection highlights Megadeth's evolution more like an anthology than a greatest-hits collection. Most interesting is the resilience the band shows throughout the decades, turning in powerful compositions more dated by the production traits of the era than any signs of Mustaine and co. mellowing. Some of these songs are indispensable staples to the metal genre, from the misanthropic sneering of '80s rippers like "Wake Up Dead" to the raging riffs and political lyrics of "Symphony of Destruction." Even as the band's catalog winds into material more fan-favored than commercially successful, the band's power and technical prowess stay full throttle. Warheads on Foreheads is too dense to be an introduction for those just getting into Megadeth, but it's a detailed and well-crafted re-tracing of the band's journey from the start. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Lounge - Released March 15, 2019 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Rock - Released January 18, 2019 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Pop - Released December 14, 2018 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

The Beach Boys' On Tour: 1968 begins with an incomplete version of "Darlin'," which is a signal that this digital-only release is another copyright clearinghouse from the Beach Boys and Capitol Records. It's larger than most of its kin, weighing in at a whopping 114 tracks. Given the size and the fact that the album is designed to round up all the existing live tapes of the Beach Boys from 1968, it's no surprise that repetitions abound. The set -- which runs five-hours-and-20 minutes -- collects concerts performed in Chicago, Fargo, Lincoln, Phoenix, and Waterloo, Iowa, along with three shows performed at two venues in London (only the first show from their stand at the Finsbury Park Astoria is here because the second was issued in 1970 as the Live in London LP). At each of these, the band plays roughly the same set list -- "Johnny B. Goode" makes an appearance in Fargo, Lincoln, and Phoenix, but not elsewhere; "Darlin'" is often truncated at the beginning of a show, as if somebody hit the record button late -- which means the main distinguishing factor is the level of band's enthusiasm, along with Mike Love's incessant, ever-changing stage banter. This similarity means that it's a bit hard to listen On Tour: 1968 in one sitting, but broken up into a series of sets, what's striking is how it showcases a group who seem to be coming into their own on-stage. With Brian Wilson sitting this tour out, the Beach Boys are augmented by keyboardist Daryl Dragon, bassist Ed Carter, percussionist Mike Kowalski, and a brass section. The auxiliary players give the group a bit of show biz flash, but the big news is that the group feels like a muscular working unit in a way they didn't during their surfing peak. This evolution runs parallel to their experimentation in the studio and makes for interesting, satisfying music -- provided that it's sampled in doses. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released December 7, 2018 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

The Beach Boys were in transition in 1968, still sporting some wounds from the implosion of SMiLE and Brian Wilson's accompanying breakdown. They rallied on 1967's Wild Honey and settled into a mellower groove for its follow-up, 1968's Friends. Wake the World: The Friends Sessions is a digital-only clearinghouse of 31 outtakes, alternate takes, demos, and incomplete tracks recorded during the making of the album (the collection also contains the "original 1966 track mix" of the SMiLE staple "Child Is the Father of the Man," which is a welcome and unexpected bonus). Where many Beach Boys outtake collections are filled to the brim with vocal tracks, Wake the World slightly favors instrumental backing tracks, a move that can emphasize the band's mellow eclecticism. Without their lyrics, "Transcendental Meditation" really swings and "When a Man Needs a Woman" has a cinematic sweep, "Passing By" boasts a lush floral arrangement and "Little Bird" feels symphonic. Such subtle transitions are evident in the alternate takes, too: "Even Steven" -- an early version of "Busy Doing Nothing" -- swings with a lounge-like insouciance. Some of these cuts are pretty skeletal -- "New Song" and "Untitled 1/25/68" are as unformed as their titles suggest -- but it's also fun to hear the band tentatively attempt Buffalo Springfield's "Rock and Roll Woman," which never quite leaves the ground. Such highlights may take some effort to excavate among the loose ends and alternate takes, but for die-hard Beach Boys fans, it is worth the time. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released December 7, 2018 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

The linchpin of the Beach Boys, Carl Wilson not only voiced some of the group's most transcendent songs but was the lone member keeping various factions of the band together in the '70s, after brothers Brian and Dennis became erratic forces in the Beach Boys' fortunes. I Can Hear Music, a 2002 collection from Japanese Capitol, is the first disc to include only songs with lead vocals from Carl, and shows fans a portion of the Beach Boys' persona -- delicate, indecisive, continually swept away by the power of music and love -- they may not have realized was so strongly a function of Carl himself. Beginning with the title song, taken from 1969's 20/20, Wilson is revealed as the old soul of the group, a force that balanced the good-time fun of Mike Love with the adolescent yearning of Brian Wilson, with elements of the former ("Good Vibrations") and the latter ("Girl Don't Tell Me"). He was spiritual but never goofy, emotive but never hokey (a weakness both Brian Wilson and Bruce Johnston occasionally surrendered to), and the only member of the band with soul. His performances on "Long Promised Road" and "God Only Knows," to spotlight only two, didn't make the songs hits upon release, but allowed them a long shelf life that, decades later, made them more familiar for fans than Beach Boys hits of the surf-and-sun years. Along with Dennis and Brian, he created beautifully wracked ballads during the '70s; songs like "The Night Was So Young" and "I'll Bet He's Nice" that showed the Beach Boys aging very ungracefully, but honestly. Granted, the collected best performances of any individual Beach Boy would be an enlightening listen, but the power of Carl's artistic persona makes this one special. © John Bush /TiVo