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Country - Released June 14, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released March 29, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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It wasn’t until 1988 that Keith Richards, at the age of 45, finally launched his solo career. Mick Jagger had recently preceded him with the albums She’s the Boss in 1985 and Primitive Cool in 1987, both of which were met with some commercial success, but are now somewhat forgotten from the history of rock’n’roll. With a smaller public reception, Talk is Cheap is evidently more rock oriented than Jagger’s albums. The master of riffs brings his influential know-how to a collection of relaxed tracks. He is supported by Steve Jordan’s solid drum rhythms and Charley Drayton’s bass. Somewhere between classic Stones rock, vintage honky-tonk, and hints of New-Orleans delta blues, Richards displays himself as more a crafter of melodies than a conventional songwriter. This solo debut resembles, above anything, an enormous, joyous jam session between friends. Such friends include: Ivan Neville (piano), Bobby Keys (sax), Waddy Wachtel (guitar), Bootsy Collins (bass), Chuck Leavell (keys), Maceo Parker (saxo), Mick Taylor (guitar), Bernie Worrell (keys) and Willie Mitchell. All in all, without his eternal other half, Keith Richards copes fairly well. Hence his return one year later with the album Steel Wheels … © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Rock - Released May 19, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released March 29, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

It wasn’t until 1988 that Keith Richards, at the age of 45, finally launched his solo career. Mick Jagger had recently preceded him with the albums She’s the Boss in 1985 and Primitive Cool in 1987, both of which were met with some commercial success, but are now somewhat forgotten from the history of rock’n’roll. With a smaller public reception, Talk is Cheap is evidently more rock oriented than Jagger’s albums. The master of riffs brings his influential know-how to a collection of relaxed tracks. He is supported by Steve Jordan’s solid drum rhythms and Charley Drayton’s bass. Somewhere between classic Stones rock, vintage honky-tonk, and hints of New-Orleans delta blues, Richards displays himself as more a crafter of melodies than a conventional songwriter. This solo debut resembles, above anything, an enormous, joyous jam session between friends. Such friends include: Ivan Neville (piano), Bobby Keys (sax), Waddy Wachtel (guitar), Bootsy Collins (bass), Chuck Leavell (keys), Maceo Parker (saxo), Mick Taylor (guitar), Bernie Worrell (keys) and Willie Mitchell. All in all, without his eternal other half, Keith Richards copes fairly well. Hence his return one year later with the album Steel Wheels … © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Pop - Released April 26, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Pop - Released July 12, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released May 19, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Electronic/Dance - Released April 26, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 28, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Pop - Released November 17, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 14, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Following a successful run on Def Jam resulting in two albums that topped Billboard's Rap and R&B album charts, Mississippi rapper Big K.R.I.T. struck out on his own with his third proper full-length, which appeared on his own Multi Alumni label. The double album is by far his most personal work -- not for nothing does he title the first song "Big K.R.I.T." and another one "Justin Scott," his real name. He maintains complete creative control here, and is far more concerned with crafting something made to last than chasing trends. This is soul-searching Southern rap steeped in the tradition of OutKast, UGK (who guest on "Ride wit Me"), and David Banner, with gospel, funk, and the blues providing the backbone. The arrangements are filled with luscious guitars and soulful organ, sounding soothing and comforting without being too laid-back. The album isn't without its hard moments, however, and the first disc is filled with trunk-rattling bangers like "Subenstein (My Sub IV)." K.R.I.T. takes a lot of stylistic chances here, particularly on the album's more experimental second disc, but they always sound natural and honest. "Justin Scott" is a dose of Isaac Hayes-inspired orchestral soul, with strings and vintage funk synths providing a bed for the choir vocals. K.R.I.T. knows how out of time this sounds, and he ends the track with a playful outro filled with voices pestering him to make something more radio-friendly, but it's obvious that he's making what's in his heart. "Aux Cord" is a winning, creative throwback jam, with shoutouts to everyone from B.B. King to Parliament to Raphael Saadiq. "Price of Fame" is the album's most moving song, reflecting on severe depression and the downside of success. Even deeper into the album, "Drinking Sessions" and "The Light" are spiritual soul-jazz excursions with fluid drums and dusky horns, as well as introspective lyrics. 4eva Is a Mighty Long Time is a mighty long album, at 20 songs and two brief skits, but K.R.I.T. clearly has a lot to say, and he expresses it with vigor and passion on this ambitious work. ~ Paul Simpson
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 28, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 13, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Country - Released September 20, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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The ghost of Sir Rosevelt looms over The Owl. Zac Brown's dance side project released an album soon after Welcome Home, the 2017 album from the Zac Brown Band, but it was buried, not even making an appearance on Billboard's Top 400. Brown didn't interpret this lack of success as rejection. Instead, he decided to push the Zac Brown Band firmly into pop, inviting Max Martin, Ryan Tedder, Poo Bear, and Skrillex into the studio to collaborate. This list of premium pop and dance producers suggests that The Owl is a far cry from the downhome charms of the Dave Cobb-produced Welcome Home, and that's true. The Owl gleams like a shiny new trinket from an upscale mall, its individual songs designed to ease onto any playlist you'd fancy. Nominally country, The Owl often throbs to electronic rhythms and is slathered in synths, to the point where even a funky blues number like "Me and the Boys in the Band" is polished so it could be considered pop. Unlike so many pop moves from country artists, The Owl is executed cleverly, never renouncing the core elements of the Zac Brown Band: "Shoofly Pie" is a loose-limbed rocker designed to keep the crowds moving during the mid-set, and "Leaving Love Behind" leans into Brown's James Taylor side. These cozy numbers just happen to be anomalies on The Owl. The rest of the record finds Brown defiantly bringing the glitzy party sensibility of Sir Rosevelt into the Zac Brown Band, getting his main group to play EDM rhythms, take a detour into rap, and play a ballad co-written by Shawn Mendes. The fact that a good chunk of the numbers work does not erase how deeply strange this album is. A band who once celebrated the simple pleasures of toes in the sand are now singing about champagne glasses filled with diamonds and, no matter how many times The Owl is spun, it's impossible to tell how they got to this point. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 12, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Mississippi rapper Big K.R.I.T.'s fourth studio album follows 2017's sprawling, highly personal double LP 4eva Is a Mighty Long Time, and appears to be a sequel to his breakout mixtape, 2010's K.R.I.T. Wuz Here. K.R.I.T. IZ HERE is a bit more back-to-basics than 4eva, but it's still an ambitious, stylistically varied set of tracks. Much of it consists of triumphant bangers, with K.R.I.T. at his confident, world-conquering best. Opener "K.R.I.T. HERE" bursts with luscious soul samples and massive, booming beats, and "Make It Easy" is along similar lines but more sentimental, filled with weeping strings. He flips from smooth, sensuous R&B (the Rico Love-assisted "Obvious") to cold, vengeful trap with "I Made" (featuring Yella Beezy), an austere dismissal of anyone who doubted K.R.I.T.'s success. While his harder side is consistently thrilling, some of the calmer songs shine bright as well, particularly the relaxed, soulful "Everytime" (with Baby Rose) and the plush "Blue Flame Ballet." "Learned from Texas" is a loving tribute to the rapper's biggest Dirty South influences, namely UGK and DJ Screw, while "Outer Space" finds him in existentialist mode, reflecting on his place in the cosmos over soft, sparkling bleeps and a snaking bass line. The swinging "M.I.S.S.I.S.S.I.P.P.I." nods to K.R.I.T.'s upbringing, seamlessly blending gospel organs and jazzy horns and upright bass with intricate drum programming. Well-rounded and creative, the album is another solid showcase of K.R.I.T.'s talents. ~ Paul Simpson
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 12, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released July 2, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Released April 1, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

George Fest: A Night to Celebrate George Harrison happened at the Fonda Theater in Los Angeles on September 28, 2014 and the whole shindig appeared in a variety of incarnations -- CDs, DVDs, Blu-rays, and downloads -- in February of 2016, a few days after what would've been the Beatle's 73rd birthday. His son Dhani directed the concert and, with the exception of Brian Wilson and Heart's Ann Wilson, he favored alt-rock stars of the 2000s: the Killers' Brandon Flowers, Nick Valensi from the Strokes, Spoon's Britt Daniel, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Cold War Kids, and the Flaming Lips form the backbone of this tribute. Around this core orbit some names that seem suitable (Norah Jones, Ben Harper, Perry Farrell), some that seem odd (Ian Astbury, Karen Elson), and some that seem like ringers (Conan O'Brien, Weird Al Yankovic), but this group is united by an affection for George Harrison, a love that runs so deep that none of the crew even make feints toward possible reinterpretations of the tunes. Everybody plays the songs they love in the way they learned them, so the highlights fall along the spectrum of sensitivity to enthusiasm. Norah Jones excels on both "Something" and "Behind That Locked Door," Karen Elson treats "I'd Have You Anytime" as a torch song, and Daniel sways handsomely to "I Me Mine," while Dhani throws himself into "Let It Down" and the two nominal comedians, Conan and Weird Al, tear it up on "Old Brown Shoe" and "What Is Life," respectively. That's enough to provide a hook for this lengthy concert but the lasting impression of George Fest is not about the performances here but rather the depth and range of Harrison's work, which perhaps is how it should be. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released November 17, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

In some bands, somebody has to be the tough guy who gets stuff done, even if other folks don't like it. While Mike Love was the frontman and frequent lead vocalist in the Beach Boys from the beginning, the group's creative soul belonged to Brian Wilson, their main songwriter, producer, arranger, and harmony enthusiast. As brilliant as Wilson was (and still is), someone needed to be the guy who cracked the whip and saw to it that they delivered a saleable product, both on-stage and in the studio, and that was where Love excelled. Consequently, there is a wide divide of opinions about Mike Love; casual fans see him as the cheery guy who delivers a well-oiled entertainment machine that plays the sheds every summer, while those who revere the Beach Boys' more ambitious work, such as Pet Sounds and Smile, revile Love as the guy who lacked an understanding of Brian's vision and turned the band into a hollow oldies act. Love is also something of an enigma musically, having released only one solo album (1981's Looking Back with Love) in a career that's spanned six decades. He's doubled his solo output with the arrival of 2017's Unleash the Love, a two-disc set that features a batch of new tunes along with remakes of venerable Beach Boys hits. If this album gives us a clearer picture of Love's own musical world view, it's one troublingly lacking in depth. Most of disc one is devoted to bland pop numbers that sound numbingly formulaic in both concept and execution ("All the Love in Paris" is built around a sax solo from Dave Koz that makes Kenny G sound like Albert Ayler), and his numbers about environmentalism and world peace boast all the sincerity of a TV public service announcement. Disc two features new recordings of old Beach Boys hits (most of which feature lyrics by Love and music by Wilson), and while the songs are much better, the arrangements sound like the work of a Beach Boys tribute band struggling to work up the enthusiasm to play the fourth set of the night. At his best, Love's voice had a tendency to sound nasal, but on these recordings (released when he was 76 years old), his instrument sounds brittle and his range has narrowed enough that he hands the lead vocals over to others on two tracks. One wonders who the intended market is for a version of "Do It Again" that features no one named Wilson but does include Mark McGrath. And the presence of a new recording of "Brian's Back," Love's '70s tribute to a guy he has since chosen not to work with, is nothing short of confounding. Lackluster as music and downright puzzling as a cultural artifact, Unleash the Love confirms that whatever you think of Mike Love's 21st century edition of the Beach Boys, he's better off doing that than trying to make music by himself. ~ Mark Deming
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Country - Released September 20, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC