Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

From
HI-RES$74.49
CD$64.49

The Metallica Blacklist

Metallica

Metal - Released September 10, 2021 | Blackened Records

Hi-Res
It would have been too easy to celebrate a Metallica birthday with a simple reissue. The band has really decided to make things special by inviting other artists to come in and have fun with their most famous album. This idea has really fired the passions of artists whose own musical upbringings were strongly influenced by this record. Rockers, DJs, folk, country, hip hop and other artists have all at one time or another gloried in some riff or chorus from this legendary beast of an album. They answered the call en masse. The result is an impressive compilation of 53 tracks. The 12 songs from the original album are each revisited several times by an amazingly diverse cast, all for a good cause (the proceeds from sales are donated to the charities supported by the artists involved in this project).From Corey Taylor to Royal Blood, via Miley Cyrus, My Morning Jacket and the Frenchmen Sebastian and Izia, everyone has their own slant, taking liberties to a greater or lesser degree, some trying to respect the original songs while others have taken a fresh approach to the 12 tracks that built a rock legend. For sure, this compilation will take a while to digest fully. But its incredible diversity makes it an album to come back to again and again, enjoying a taste of a few different morsels each time. In the end, one is almost more thrilled by the “freer” versions, like the excellent Sad But True by Jason Isbell, Holier Than Thou by Biffy Clyro, Of Wolf And Man by Goodbye, Texas or The God That Failed by Idles, which offer a new point of view. Meanwhile interpretations by the likes of Volbeat or Weezer turn out to be closer to the original versions, and therefore  less surprising. And then there are those, like Dave Gahan, whose voices will leave listeners spellbound, no matter how they decide to reinterpret these classics. We might be tempted to speak of Blacklist as a mish-mash: but really, it is a mine, because it is full of gems. This is a very fine way to celebrate a birthday. © Chief Brody/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$147.99
CD$128.49

Metallica

Metallica

Metal - Released September 10, 2021 | Blackened Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Metallica

Metallica

Metal - Released August 12, 1991 | Blackened Records

Hi-Res
After the muddled production and ultracomplicated song structures of ...And Justice for All, Metallica decided that they had taken the progressive elements of their music as far as they could and that a simplification and streamlining of their sound was in order. While the assessment made sense from a musical standpoint, it also presented an opportunity to commercialize their music, and Metallica accomplishes both goals. The best songs are more melodic and immediate, the crushing, stripped-down grooves of "Enter Sandman," "Sad but True," and "Wherever I May Roam" sticking to traditional structures and using the same main riffs throughout; the crisp, professional production by Bob Rock adds to their accessibility. "The Unforgiven" and "Nothing Else Matters" avoid the slash-and-burn guitar riffs that had always punctuated the band's ballads; the latter is a full-fledged love song complete with string section, which works much better than might be imagined. The song- and riff-writing slips here and there, a rare occurrence for Metallica, which some longtime fans interpreted as filler next to a batch of singles calculated for commercial success. The objections were often more to the idea that Metallica was doing anything explicitly commercial, but millions more disagreed. In fact, the band's popularity exploded so much that most of their back catalog found mainstream acceptance in its own right, while other progressively inclined speed metal bands copied the move toward simplification. In retrospect, Metallica is a good, but not quite great, album, one whose best moments deservedly captured the heavy metal crown, but whose approach also foreshadowed a creative decline. © Steve Huey /TiVo
From
HI-RES$32.49
CD$28.49

Metallica

Metallica

Metal - Released August 12, 1991 | Blackened Records

Hi-Res
After the muddled production and ultracomplicated song structures of ...And Justice for All, Metallica decided that they had taken the progressive elements of their music as far as they could and that a simplification and streamlining of their sound was in order. While the assessment made sense from a musical standpoint, it also presented an opportunity to commercialize their music, and Metallica accomplishes both goals. The best songs are more melodic and immediate, the crushing, stripped-down grooves of "Enter Sandman," "Sad but True," and "Wherever I May Roam" sticking to traditional structures and using the same main riffs throughout; the crisp, professional production by Bob Rock adds to their accessibility. "The Unforgiven" and "Nothing Else Matters" avoid the slash-and-burn guitar riffs that had always punctuated the band's ballads; the latter is a full-fledged love song complete with string section, which works much better than might be imagined. The song- and riff-writing slips here and there, a rare occurrence for Metallica, which some longtime fans interpreted as filler next to a batch of singles calculated for commercial success. The objections were often more to the idea that Metallica was doing anything explicitly commercial, but millions more disagreed. In fact, the band's popularity exploded so much that most of their back catalog found mainstream acceptance in its own right, while other progressively inclined speed metal bands copied the move toward simplification. In retrospect, Metallica is a good, but not quite great, album, one whose best moments deservedly captured the heavy metal crown, but whose approach also foreshadowed a creative decline. © Steve Huey /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Some Kind of Monster EP

Metallica

Metal - Released October 16, 2020 | Blackened Records

Booklet
From
HI-RES$21.99
CD$18.99

S&M2

Metallica

Metal - Released August 28, 2020 | Blackened Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$18.99

S&M2

Metallica

Metal - Released August 28, 2020 | Blackened Records

Who can forget the first S&M (Symphony and Metallica) released in 1999, where the Four Horsemen performed their greatest hits with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. That first performance was conducted by Michael Kamen and was praised by critics and fans alike. There was huge demand for a second performance and it finally became a reality in 2019. Led this time by Michael Tilson Thomas, the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and Metallica offer a purer vision than the one Kamen chose twenty years earlier. Rather than adding on layers of brass and strings like Kamen did, Tilson Thomas truly uses the orchestra to support the Californians’ music rather than enveloping it, retaining the essence of the original pieces, which become even more intense. This is a union between two worlds and the superimposed feeling of the first S&M disappears. The grandiloquent overture The Ecstacy of Gold (Ennio Morricone) introduces the instrumental The Call of Ktulu with an almost jubilant brilliance. Metallica also ventures into more acoustic lands (the band becoming more and more inclined to revisit their pieces in different tonalities) letting James Hetfield and the orchestra transport us into almost aerial atmospheres, like on All Within My Hands.  Not just in a supporting role, the San Francisco Orchestra uses Metallica for relevant and enjoyable performances of Sergei Prokofiev’s Scythian Suite (Chuzhbog and The Dance of the Dark Spirits) and The Iron Foundry Opus 19 (Alexander Mosolov). Excellent choices that manage to grab you by the throat and convey an astonishing atmosphere. (Anesthesia) Pulling Teeth, an instrumental originally composed and played by the late bassist Cliff Burton, is covered by double bassist Scott Pingel, making for a real highlight of the concert. It’s a shame that Metallica chose to include some of their classics, which are less suited to this orchestral setting, as it would have perhaps provided a more logical and cohesive setlist. S&M 2 is surprising and moving but also a bit frustrating at times. The Four Horsemen seem determined to take their catalogue in unexpected directions and to please themselves and their audience at the same time. Who knows where the limit will be… © Maxime Archambaud/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Nothing Else Matters (Live)

Metallica

Metal - Released August 5, 2020 | Blackened Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$1.49

Nothing Else Matters (Live)

Metallica

Metal - Released August 5, 2020 | Blackened Records

From
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

All Within My Hands (Live)

Metallica

Metal - Released August 5, 2020 | Blackened Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$1.49

All Within My Hands (Live)

Metallica

Metal - Released August 5, 2020 | Blackened Records

Blackened 2020

Metallica

Metal - Released May 15, 2020 | Blackened Records

Download not available
From
CD$12.99

Helping Hands...Live & Acoustic at the Masonic

Metallica

Metal - Released February 1, 2019 | Blackened Records

From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$15.49

Hardwired...To Self-Destruct

Metallica

Metal - Released November 18, 2016 | Blackened Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$23.49
CD$20.49

Live S**t: Binge & Purge

Metallica

Metal - Released December 31, 2013 | Blackened Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$12.99

Death Magnetic

Metallica

Metal - Released October 8, 2013 | Blackened Records

Booklet
From
CD$12.99

St. Anger

Metallica

Metal - Released October 8, 2013 | Blackened Records

From
HI-RES$18.99
CD$16.49

Metallica Through the Never

Metallica

Metal - Released September 24, 2013 | Blackened Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$18.99

S&M (with Michael Kamen Conducting the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra)

Metallica

Metal - Released November 23, 1999 | Blackened Records

After 1988's ...And Justice for All, Metallica pared down its progressive, heavy metal sound. During the '90s, the band's studio releases grew slicker and more produced, resulting in mostly radio-friendly, good ol' boy metal. By the end of the decade, Metallica was established as the pioneer of modern metal, but the band hadn't done anything innovative, arguably, in ten years. In April 1999, the group performed two concerts with the San Francisco Symphony, and the result was S&M, a two-disc collection of the concerts. Overall, the album successfully pairs violin strings with guitar strings, but it's no surprise that the best tracks here are the older songs; their multi-layered, compositional style works well with symphonic arrangements. "Master of Puppets," "Call of the Ktulu," "One," and "For Whom the Bell Tolls" sound richer and fuller with violin, trumpet, clarinet, harp, trombone, and flute accompaniments, but "Sad but True," "Devil's Dance," and especially "Of Wolf and Man" range from haphazard and melodramatic to uninspired. S&M definitely has its moments, and not just with the pre-Black Album material: "Fuel" surpasses the furious pumping energy of the studio version, "Hero of the Day" stays poignant throughout, and "Until It Sleeps" has a wonderfully sinister feel. James Hetfield maintains his madman persona from beginning to end, laughing maniacally and grunting and growling at all the right moments. Overall, the symphony adds a macabre, ghoulish atmosphere -- it all sounds like a Broadway freak show or a revved-up Danny Elfman nightmare. Which is exactly what a Metallica album should sound like, even if every song isn't the best (or most appropriate) in the band's catalog. © Gina Boldman /TiVo
From
CD$16.49

Metallica Through the Never

Metallica

Metal - Released September 23, 2013 | Blackened Records

As a member of thrash metal's heralded "big four," Metallica helped to bring heavy metal from the underground into the mainstream, becoming one of the most influential and successful metal bands of all time in the process. And while the band's output after the breakout success of the Black Album in 1991 has been less than stellar, one need only take a listen to Through the Never, the live album that accompanies the band's IMAX film of the same name, to remember the driving brilliance the band once delivered. Packed with classic tracks like "For Whom the Bell Tolls," "And Justice for All," and "Master of Puppets," the album shows Metallica diving back into their past with the same vigor and creativity they brought to the table almost 30 years ago when this kind of metal seemed more like a musical endurance test than a Grammy-winning endeavor. While the album doesn't quite cover the ground of Live Shit: Binge & Purge, it's a relatively compact listening experience showing that, even though they might be spending their time making movies and collaborating with Lou Reed, the Metallica we all know and love is still in there somewhere. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo