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Classical - Released April 30, 2021 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Among the ten Mahler symphonies via eight conductors that the Berlin Philharmonic has released this year on its own label – captured at various points over the past decade – their 2017 account of No. 9 with Bernard Haitink is undoubtedly one of its highlights. No wonder, perhaps, when Haitink has been known for his Mahler ever since he contributed to his home country's Mahler renaissance from the early 1960s, as Chief Conductor of the Amsterdam Concertgebouw. Back to the Berliners, with whom his relationship is equally a longstanding and close one, and you know you're in for a treat right from the off: lucid textures filling the Philharmonie's warmly analytical space; endless long lines; the sheen and polish of the strings, first appearing meltingly soft before graduating to a searing luminosity, matched by equally searing, burnished brass; climaxes for which “searing” is again the word, turning on a pin from radiant to shattering, and delivered with a devastating intensity and forwards propulsion; the simple dignity of the first violin's solo at the recapitulation, all the more affecting for its emotional restraint. From the central two movements there's then a constantly shifting blend of elegance and rustic edge, intimate in pointe chamber playing and hard-voiced tutti power, and multi-shaded humour and hysteria. The woodwind's town band impressions are on the sophisticated end of the scale, but that's no bad thing, and the glossy acidic bite and semi-hysteria the strings bring to their second movement downwards slides is delicious. Perhaps the third movement's final explosion could be more satisfyingly cataclysmic if it were a shade darker and heavier, but the final movement's gradual relinquishing of life is all you could hope for in its soft-voiced intensity – you're hanging off not just their every note, but also the weighted silence of the Philharmonie itself. Indeed, when it's possible to feel taken on such a spellbinding journey from the humdrum surroundings of one's own home, sitting in the hall with them must have been unforgettable. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 26, 2021 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released February 26, 2021 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released February 12, 2021 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released December 18, 2020 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released November 27, 2020 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released October 23, 2020 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Symphonies - Released September 25, 2020 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released September 25, 2020 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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In June 2015, the Berliner Philharmoniker elected Kirill Petrenko as their new chief conductor; he took up office a year ago. An exclusive edition now presents central recordings of this phase of anticipation and new beginnings. Performances of works by Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Franz Schmidt and Rudi Stephan reveal not only the first important programme directions, but also the exciting, intensive music-making in this partnership. © Berliner Philharmoniker Recordings
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Classical - Released December 6, 2019 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Recorded over the course of four concerts in Berlin in 2010, Sir Simon Rattle and “his” Berlin Philharmoniker successfully punctuate their complete collection of symphonies with these five concertos. While these were recorded before the symphonies, you can identify a distinct chamber music-like tonality, with an orchestra whose dimensions have been clearly reduced compared to the traditional size of the renowned Berlin ensemble. This integral work is first and foremost an orchestral delight thanks to the lyricism of the wind section and the silky characteristics of the strings. Far from being simply a support act to the soloist, the Japanese pianist Mitsuko Uchida, the orchestra instead seems to lead the operation with a speedy rhythm and an inimitable sense of musical rhetoric. Mitsuko Uchida almost appears to play modestly, never wanting to hog the spotlight, in a constant dialogue with the conductor. From the bonhomie of the first two concertos through to the Fifth (wrongly named the Emperor) which paved the way for the more romantic concertos, via the Fourth with its sublime Andante con moto which raises some metaphysical questions, this intimate performance cements this Beethovenian collection in its rightful era, lest we forget that these concertos were written in the first decade of the nineteenth century, in the midst of a triumphant Viennese classicism at a time when Joseph Haydn was writing his final few masterpieces and Napoleon’s Grande Armée was bombarding Vienna. With such a sonic perspective and a sound recording which never lets the piano become intrusive, these concertos which are often performed like works written fifty years afterwards, strike an instrumental balance and recover their true musical essence, which had slowly been beginning to disappear. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 29, 2019 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released November 29, 2019 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Symphonic Music - Released November 8, 2019 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released August 16, 2019 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released August 16, 2019 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Symphonies - Released May 10, 2019 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released May 18, 2018 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released May 18, 2018 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Classical - Released May 18, 2018 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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