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Classical - Released February 7, 2020 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Symphonic Music - Released September 6, 2019 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
This complete edition of the symphonic works of Edvard Grieg is especially convincing thanks to the authentic approach of the Norwegian Eivind Aadland, who strongly influences the interpretations of the WDR Symphony Orchestra Cologne under his direction. The first LP of this series presents two of Grieg's principal collections on 180g vinyl: his first Peer Gynt suite from the incidental music to Henrik Ibsen's drama Peer Gynt, the story of the "Nordic Faust" which inspired Grieg to compose a sonic panorama of the Norwegian character - from the melancholy song Death of Åses to the furious chase in the Hall of the Mountain King - as well as his four Symphonic Dances Op. 64 of 1898, where the composer draws on his experiences as a conductor of the leading European orchestras. The second LP of this Grieg series includes the second Peer Gynt suite, the Funeral March in Memory of Rikard Nordraak as well as the famous suite From Holberg's Time - a homage to Ludvig Holberg, the caustic "Molière of the North" - and Klokkeklang - an almost impressionist study documenting a surprisingly visionary trait of the otherwise rather conservative composer. © audite
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Chamber Music - Released May 3, 2019 | audite Musikproduktion

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After forays to Spain and France, the Cheng2 Duo ventures to Russia for their third audite album. The "Süddeutsche Zeitung" described Bryan and Silvie Cheng's last CD, dedicated to Spanish music, as an "event of austere and severe, but also dreamy beauty", and praised the siblings' interpretation for "finding the correct idiom which manages to raise the temperature". Their new double album centres on the three great sonatas for cello and piano by Dmitri Shostakovich, Sergei Rachmaninov and Sergei Prokofiev. The Cheng2 Duo contrasts these with a series of shorter pieces by Anton Arensky, Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky and Alexander Glazunov. This comprehensive programme represents a short history of Russian cello music which began with the foundation of the great music conservatoires in Saint Petersburg and Moscow in the middle of the nineteenth century. Cellist Bryan Cheng is hailed internationally for his "absolutely astonishing" (La Presse, Montréal) command of the cello, and "abundant facility, innate musicality, and sense of joy" (New York Concert Review). He made his solo debut at age 10 with the Orchestre de chambre I Musici de Montréal, his Carnegie Hall recital debut at 14, and most recently, his Elbphilharmonie solo debut with the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen and conductor Joshua Weilerstein in 2018. Lauded for her "extraordinarily varied palette" (WholeNote Magazine) and "purely magical" playing (New York Concert Review), pianist Silvie Cheng illuminates musical works with her exquisite touch at the keyboard. Since her Carnegie Hall solo debut in 2011, she has performed as both soloist and collaborative pianist across the globe. As guest soloist with orchestra, Silvie most recently made her debut with the New Amsterdam Symphony Orchestra in 2018 and will debut with Symphony Nova Scotia in the 2019-20 season. © Audite
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Classical - Released April 5, 2019 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released January 11, 2019 | audite Musikproduktion

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice
Invaluable sound documents from one of the greatest pianists of the twentieth century. The third and final volume of the Berlin radio recordings by Cuban-born American pianist Jorge Bolet on audite presents repertoire novelties. With the exception of the Fledermaus paraphrase, all recordings are released for the first time. Once again, Bolet's performances document his universality and unceasing inquisitiveness, as well as his phenomenal musicianship and ability to adapt his virtuosity to diverse works. These recordings are therefore invaluable documents of a musician who today is justly considered one of the greatest pianists of the twentieth century. This selection comprises works of Beethoven, Chopin, Debussy, Dello Joio, Franck, Godowsky, Grieg, Liszt and Schumann. Beethoven's Fifth Piano Concerto did not form part of Bolet's regular repertoire: it is the only live recording on this edition. Further highlights include Schumann's Third Piano Sonata as well as major works by Chopin, such as the complete Op. 25 Études, in Bolet's masterful, lyrical interpretations. As an "encore", Bolet plays Godowsky's Concert Paraphrase of Strauss' Die Fledermaus. © Audite
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Symphonic Music - Released November 2, 2018 | audite Musikproduktion

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Classical - Released June 8, 2018 | audite Musikproduktion

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An honorary citizen of the town of Cremorna, the birthplace of Antonio Stradivari and many other makers of stringed instruments, in 2017 the Quartetto di Cremona finished its complete recordings of Beethoven's quartets, which they started in 2013, and which are presented here in a single album. This is an opportunity to rediscover the extent to which these recordings reign supreme over a discography which is hardly short of stand-out recordings, starting with the one by their former colleagues of the Quartetto Italiano which remains one of the greatest in the history of the music. Either using the four Stradivariuses loaned them by a Japanese foundation, or the prestigious instruments provided by a German cultural foundation (by Guadagnini, Testor, Torazzi and Amati), the Quartetto di Cremorna brings us Beethoven's whole range of expression, from the Haydnian humour and rhythmical vigour of the Opus 18 to the metaphysical depths of the final quartets, by way of the serene luminosity of the Razoumovski quartets. In their performances, which foreground dynamic contrasts, sometimes to excess, sonic finesse is constantly blended with expressive depth and a savvy mix of heart and brain. The presentation here is not chronological, but follows the release of albums which each presented different quartets in three of Beethoven's "styles" according to the method of Wilhelm von Lenz, which prevailed in the 19th century after 1852. The serious fan could easily arrange these quartets for listening in an order of their own preference. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released April 6, 2018 | audite Musikproduktion

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Following two albums dedicated to Brahms’ sonatas and Russian sonatas released in 2008 under Aeon, Marc Coppey and Peter Laul present a Beethoven piece for cello and piano. Recorded live in 2017 in the marvellous baroque treasure that is the Small Hall of the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, this new complete collection features the five sonatas and three series of variations on themes by Handel and Mozart. This corpus for cello and piano by Beethoven provides a striking shortcut through the three periods (formerly known as his three “styles”) of his musical evolution and it ushers in a long line of compositions for cello that only just started emancipating themselves from the continuo to which they were still restricted at the end of the 18th century. Used to emphasise the piano in the first two sonatas, the cello fully expresses itself in the third sonata, in which the dialogue establishes itself equitably and becomes genuinely virtuosic and soloist in the last two sonatas of the Op. 102. The perspective here is from cellist Marc Coppey, winner of the Leipzig Bach Competition at just eighteen years of age, and supported for his debut by Yehudi Menuhin. An international soloist and a professor at the Paris Conservatory, he teams up with pianist Peter Laul, a highly sought-after chamber musician trained at the St. Petersburg Conservatory where he now teaches, after winning prizes at the Bremen International Competition (1995, 1997) and the Moscow Scriabin piano competition (2000). Both musicians also frequently play in a trio with Russian violinist Liana Gourdjia. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 25, 2015 | audite Musikproduktion

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Opera Extracts - Released June 6, 2014 | audite Musikproduktion

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released September 17, 2010 | audite Musikproduktion

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Classical - Released May 15, 2009 | audite Musikproduktion

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Opera - Released November 19, 2008 | audite Musikproduktion

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This live recording, made in Berlin, documents the hugely successful 1952 revival of Porgy and Bess that toured the U.S. and numerous European cities. Although the production restored music that had been omitted from the work's previous performances, this version still contains almost an hour less music than the most "complete" modern recordings. In spite of that caveat, and the fact that this version uses a reduced orchestration, this gripping performance should be a cause for rejoicing for anyone who loves the opera. Conducted by Alexander Smallens, who led the opera's premiere under the composer's supervision, this version is a direct link to Gershwin's interpretive intentions for the music, and it's a compelling reading, driving and propulsive, but organically fluid. A great deal of credit goes to Robert Breen for the vitality of his naturalistic direction. The opening scene, for example, is a vibrant portrait of life on Catfish Row, full of chaotic talking, shouting, improvised singing, and drumming that continues throughout the whole scene, subsiding only when the drama demands it, as in the shocked silence that follows Robbins' murder and for the showcase musical numbers like "Summertime," and "A woman is a sometime thing." The realism of the approach brings the community fully to life and makes for an astonishing musical and dramatic experience, unlike anything one is likely to encounter in an opera house. The soloists are fabulous and their vivid characterizations are immediately engaging. Cab Calloway was a legendary Sportin' Life, and the originality and eccentricity of this performance fully validates his reputation. William Warfield's Porgy is intensely humane and honest, and he sings with warmth and without any affectation. Leontyne Price was only 25 when the recording was made, and Bess was her breakthrough role; while she doesn't have the dramatic presence of the other leads, she sings with thrilling fullness and passion. The noise level of the recording is initially distracting, but as the magic of the performance takes hold, it becomes less of an issue. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released October 8, 2008 | audite Musikproduktion

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For dedicated fans of Herbert von Karajan, this two-disc set with the late Austrian conductor leading the Berliner Philharmoniker in Beethoven's Third and Ninth symphonies will be mandatory listening. Karajan had recorded the Ninth once before with the Wiener Philharmoniker in 1947 and had already embarked earlier on recording the composer's complete symphonies with London's Philharmonia, including a Third in 1952 and a Ninth in 1955. But he had not yet recorded these works with the Berliner Philharmoniker, the orchestra he had recently inherited from the late Wilhelm Furtwängler. His three cycles with the German orchestra from 1963, 1977, and 1984 were yet to come, and these 1953 and 1957 recordings show how the Austrian conductor and the German orchestra were getting along before their relationship had been formally immortalized in studio recordings. The performances contain no special surprises. At this point in this career, Karajan was still just a very famous conductor and not quite yet the so-called "General Music Director of Europe," and his interpretations here are far more about the music and far less about Karajan the interpreter than they were to become. This doesn't mean these performances don't sound like Karajan performances. The same emphasis on the linear over the horizontal, the surface over the depths, and the beautiful over the profound characteristic of his later Beethoven interpretations is clearly manifest here. Thus, the 1953 Third is straight, smooth, and direct while the 1957 Ninth is big, refined, and polished, and though neither performance can really match the conductor's later recordings for tonal opulence, both are still pure Karajan in conception and execution and the Berliner Philharmoniker seems more than happy to provide a well-tuned sound and brilliant ensemble virtuosity. For those listeners who abjure the Austrian conductor, this will be all they need to hear to know to stay away from these performances and stick to their Furtwänglers. But dedicated fans will be no doubt find these recordings fascinating. It should be added that Audite's live monaural sound is dim, distant, and gray, with little detail and less impact. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released December 1, 2007 | audite Musikproduktion

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