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Summertime

Beck

Alternative & Indie - Released July 20, 2010 | ABKCO (US)

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Cameo Parkway Holiday Hits

Various Artists

Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 2010 | ABKCO (US)

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Scott Pilgrim vs. the World: The Game (Original Videogame Soundtrack)

Anamanaguchi

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2010 | ABKCO (US)

Everything connected to the film adaptation of Bryan Lee O’Malley's comic Scott Pilgrim vs. the World was made with loving attention to detail, so it’s no surprise that the soundtrack to the movie’s tie-in video game is just as well crafted. Of course, most movies don’t lend themselves to video games as well as Scott Pilgrim vs. the World -- which uses video game jargon and imagery to demonstrate how Scott grows as a person as he takes on the seven evil exes of his crush Ramona Flowers -- and fewer still films provide such a distinct aesthetic for a game’s music. Scott Pilgrim vs. the World: The Game is a side-scrolling fighter rendered in beautifully old-school 8-bit graphics, and the music follows suit. The game’s developers hired 8-bit band Anamanaguchi to provide the music, and they serve up hyperkinetic tracks that sound like they’ve been hiding on an NES cartridge for a quarter century. While the adorable “Another Winter” and “Suburban Tram” throw in some guitars and live drums for an indie rock twist, most of these songs are pure chiptune goodness, particularly “Sushi Box,” “Maki Ya,” and “Bollywood,” which capture the frenzied pace, rapid-fire arpeggios, and wild pitch-bending of classic 8-bit music. Indeed, “Twin Dragons,” “Technoman,” and “Subboss Theme” nod even more firmly to the game and soundtrack’s inspirations, reaffirming just how much knowledge and affection Anamanaguchi and the game’s creators have for the culture that spawned Scott Pilgrim. Almost as entertaining as the game itself, Scott Pilgrim vs. the World: The Game’s music will delight gamers, 8-bit aficionados, and fans of Scott Pilgrim’s extended universe. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Middle Men (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Various Artists

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2010 | ABKCO (US)

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Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World

Various Artists

Film Soundtracks - Released August 6, 2012 | ABKCO (US)

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Percy Jackson And The Olympians: The Lightning Thief (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Christophe Beck

Film Soundtracks - Released February 16, 2010 | ABKCO (US)

The similarity between the Harry Potter series of fantasy novels for young adolescents and the Percy Jackson series of fantasy novels for young adolescents is reinforced by the choice of Chris Columbus, who directed the first two Harry Potter movies, to direct the first Percy Jackson movie, Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief. Columbus' choice of Christophe Beck as the film's composer also seems appropriate, since Beck cut his teeth writing music for the TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer (winning an Emmy in the process) and has gone on to a series of often youth-oriented Hollywood comedies. Beck brings to bear the full resources of the A-list of Hollywood orchestral musicians here, and they play a highly conventional big orchestral score to accompany the story of a teenager contending with the gods of Mount Olympus. Beck likes to have the many horns carry his alternately heroic and wistful melodies, while the massed strings provide rhythmic underpinning. It's not hard to tell what sorts of activities the musical cues accompany, as titles like "The Fury" indicate that feats of derring-do are being enacted on the big screen while Beck's galloping music fills the theater. He reserves his big main theme, appropriately enough, for a cue called "Hollywood." Indeed, this is Hollywood 101, nothing that hasn't been heard before, just as the film is strongly suggestive of similar sorts of entertainment that have sopped up lots of money from multiplexes in recent years. But it is effectively done all the same. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Percy Jackson And The Lightning Thief (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Christophe Beck

Film Soundtracks - Released February 16, 2010 | ABKCO (US)

The similarity between the Harry Potter series of fantasy novels for young adolescents and the Percy Jackson series of fantasy novels for young adolescents is reinforced by the choice of Chris Columbus, who directed the first two Harry Potter movies, to direct the first Percy Jackson movie, Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief. Columbus' choice of Christophe Beck as the film's composer also seems appropriate, since Beck cut his teeth writing music for the TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer (winning an Emmy in the process) and has gone on to a series of often youth-oriented Hollywood comedies. Beck brings to bear the full resources of the A-list of Hollywood orchestral musicians here, and they play a highly conventional big orchestral score to accompany the story of a teenager contending with the gods of Mount Olympus. Beck likes to have the many horns carry his alternately heroic and wistful melodies, while the massed strings provide rhythmic underpinning. It's not hard to tell what sorts of activities the musical cues accompany, as titles like "The Fury" indicate that feats of derring-do are being enacted on the big screen while Beck's galloping music fills the theater. He reserves his big main theme, appropriately enough, for a cue called "Hollywood." Indeed, this is Hollywood 101, nothing that hasn't been heard before, just as the film is strongly suggestive of similar sorts of entertainment that have sopped up lots of money from multiplexes in recent years. But it is effectively done all the same. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Middle Men (Music From The Original Score)

Brian Tyler

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2010 | ABKCO (US)

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Fantastic Mr. Fox (Original Soundtrack)

Various Artists

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2009 | ABKCO (US)

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The Men Who Stare At Goats (Original Soundtrack)

Rolfe Kent

Film Soundtracks - Released November 2, 2012 | ABKCO (US)

Based on a Jon Ronson book, The Men Who Stare at Goats is a globetrotting adventure about a man attempting to figure out who he is while investigating the United States' experiments to discover the military applications of new age concepts. As the film spends a lot of time in Kuwait, the score features a blend of drifting new age and Middle Eastern music, giving it a calming yet exotic quality that pairs beautifully with the film. For a movie that heavily features the military, the score is rather low-key, making for a more relaxing excursion than one would expect from a film set in a war zone. Whether you're looking for some soothing background music with an international flair or just want to revisit the strange story of the First Earth Battalion, The Men Who Stare at Goats' score has what you need. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Superstar

David May

Dance - Released January 1, 2009 | ABKCO (US)

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All About Steve (Music From The Motion Picture)

Various Artists

Film Soundtracks - Released October 18, 2010 | ABKCO (US)

Booklet
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The Holy Mountain (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Alejandro Jodorowsky

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1973 | ABKCO (US)

While not as well-known as his iconic lysergic western El Topo, which became one of the major midnight movies of the '70s, The Holy Mountain is arguably the definitive work from Chilean/Mexican filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky, a visually dazzling and gloriously confounding story of the search for spiritual enlightenment. While it's all but impossible to describe what happens in The Holy Mountain, given its emphasis on surreal visuals over narrative, it's a cult film for the best reasons -- love it or hate it, it's a remarkable and thoroughly individual accomplishment -- and the soundtrack album, featuring Jodorowsky's original score, is an eclectic and interesting listen in its own right. The music sways from rock ("Psychedelic Weapons") to esoteric folk music ("Pissed and Passed Out") to subtle tone poems ("Violence of the Lambs") to grand-scale orchestral themes ("Christs 4 Sale"), with plenty of room for lyrical musical backdrops ("Communion"), a dash of vintage dance music ("A Walk in the Park"), and even some Tuvan throat singing ("Trance Mutation"). This music is never as trippy or engrossing as the movie it was designed to accompany, but Jodorowsky's melodic sense is sure and appealing, and it's not hard to imagine he could have become a successful composer if he'd set his mind to that goal. The Holy Mountain is most strongly recommended for fans of the film, but soundtrack collectors with a taste for the offbeat with doubtless find this rewarding. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Get Yer Ya-Ya's Out! (40th Anniversary Deluxe Version)

The Rolling Stones

Rock - Released September 4, 1970 | ABKCO (US)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Recorded during their American tour in late 1969 and centered around live versions of material from the Beggars Banquet-Let It Bleed era, Get Yer Ya-Ya's Out! is often acclaimed as one of the top live rock albums of all time, although its appeal has dimmed a little today. The live versions are reasonably different from the studio ones, but ultimately not as good, a notable exception being the long workout of "Midnight Rambler," with extended harmonica solos and the unforgettable section where the pace slows to a bump-and-grind crawl. Some Stones aficionados, in fact, prefer a bootleg from the same tour (Liver Than You'll Ever Be, to which this album was unleashed in response), or their amazing the-show-must-go-on performance in the jaws of hell at Altamont (preserved in the Gimme Shelter film). Fans who are unconcerned with picky comparisons such as these will still find Ya-Ya's an outstanding album, and it's certainly the Stones' best official live recording. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Get Yer Ya-Ya's Out!

The Rolling Stones

Rock - Released September 4, 1970 | ABKCO (US)

Recorded during their American tour in late 1969 and centered around live versions of material from the Beggars Banquet-Let It Bleed era, Get Yer Ya-Ya's Out! is often acclaimed as one of the top live rock albums of all time, although its appeal has dimmed a little today. The live versions are reasonably different from the studio ones, but ultimately not as good, a notable exception being the long workout of "Midnight Rambler," with extended harmonica solos and the unforgettable section where the pace slows to a bump-and-grind crawl. Some Stones aficionados, in fact, prefer a bootleg from the same tour (Liver Than You'll Ever Be, to which this album was unleashed in response), or their amazing the-show-must-go-on performance in the jaws of hell at Altamont (preserved in the Gimme Shelter film). Fans who are unconcerned with picky comparisons such as these will still find Ya-Ya's an outstanding album, and it's certainly the Stones' best official live recording. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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El Topo (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Alejandro Jodorowsky

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1970 | ABKCO (US)

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Through The Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2)

The Rolling Stones

Rock - Released September 1, 1969 | ABKCO (US)

This album was spawned by three coinciding events -- the need to acknowledge the death of band co-founder Brian Jones (whose epitaph graces the inside cover) in July of 1969; the need to get "Honky Tonk Women," then a huge hit single, onto an LP; and to fill the ten-month gap since the release of Beggars Banquet and get an album with built-in appeal into stores ahead of the Stones' first American tour in three years. The fact that the Stones had amassed a sufficient number of hits since their last greatest-hits compilation in early 1966 (Big Hits: High Tide and Green Grass) made this a no-brainer, and its song lineup was as potent at the time as any compilation of hit singles by any artist. From the group's excursions into fey psychedelia ("Paint It, Black," "Ruby Tuesday," "She's a Rainbow," "Dandelion"), space rock ("2000 Light Years From Home"), punk decadence ("Mother's Little Helper"), and back to straight-ahead rock & roll ("Jumpin' Jack Flash"), some of it with a topical edge ("Street Fighting Man"), it's all incredibly potent, though also redundant to the extent that "Ruby Tuesday" and "Let's Spend the Night Together" had previously appeared on two U.S. albums. The presence of "Honky Tonk Women" propelled it to gold record status upon release on both sides of the Atlantic, although the simultaneously released British version (long out of print, except as a bootleg CD) is different and more confusing, but also more diverse and rewarding musically than the American version. Both this album and Big Hits: High Tide and Green Grass have been supplanted by Hot Rocks and More Hot Rocks, but are still handy in their tight respective focuses. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass)

The Rolling Stones

Rock - Released April 2, 1966 | ABKCO (US)

The first hits compilation of the Rolling Stones is still one of the most potent collections of singles that one can find. Listening to it in 1966 or today, one can understand how, almost prematurely for the 1960s -- as most of the material here dates from 1964 or 1965 -- the Stones set themselves up as the decade's most visible rock & roll rebels. The defiant, in-your-face fuzztone riff and sexually frustrated lyrics of "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" and the frenetic pounding punk anthem "Get Off of My Cloud" are highlights of a 12-song set that has no weak points, only peaks -- the louder-than-life rhythm guitars on "It's All Over Now" and "The Last Time," the wailing R&B of "Time Is on My Side," the balladry, folk, and soul style of "As Tears Go By" and "Tell Me," and all of the rest make for a body of work that's still amazing to hear decades after the fact. Appearing as it did in the late winter of 1966, this collection completely missed the group's drift into psychedelia, and it has since been supplanted by Hot Rocks and More Hot Rocks, but Big Hits is still the most concentrated dose of the early Stones at their most accessible that is to be had, short of simply playing their first five U.S. albums. The artwork and photography were pretty cool too, and the original LP had one of rock's early classic gatefold album designs. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Terry Knight And The Pack/Reflections

Terry Knight And The Pack

Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | ABKCO (US)

This two-fer compiles the only two albums by Michigan's Terry Knight & the Pack; its self-titled 1966 debut and 1967's Reflections. Rock & roll collector's and Michigan rock aficionados have given these albums semi-legendary status simply because the lineup included the roots of Grand Funk Railroad -- Knight was the band's manager and producer until 1972, and both guitarist Mark Farner and drummer Don Brewer came from its ranks. These two recordings were originally issued on the Lucky Eleven imprint and were distributed by Cameo/Parkway who had scored a number one hit with "96 Tears" by ? and the Mysterians, another Michigan act. Knight's gift wasn't so much as a singer, but as a songwriter capable of aping the hitmakers of the day, and he knew how to arrange. This is born out on the first album's covers of Sonny Bono's "Where Do You Go," "You're a Better Man Than I" (a hit for the Yardbirds), and a particularly strange reading of the Rolling Stones' "Lady Jane." The single from the album was a reading of the Lieber & Stoller nugget "I (Who Have Nothing)." Knight's own tunes include the fuzz guitar-drenched album-opener "Numbers" was reminiscent of the Seeds, while "What's on Your Mind" walked a line between Georgie Fame and the Zombies. The band's second album, Reflections, opens with the whitest cover of Joe Tex's "One Monkey (Don't Stop No Show)" ever. It also includes a direct steal of Donovan's songwriting style and vocal phrasing, in Knight's "Dirty Lady," and Bob Dylan's early electric sound on "Dimestore Debutante." There are some real rockers here, too, in "Love, Love, Love, Love, Love," that's reminiscent of the Standells, the soul-inflected-cum-Association-influenced "This Train," and a unique garage psych cover of the Stones' "(I Can't No) Satisfaction." This may not be Michigan Rock at its finest, but it is an integral part of its history. © Thom Jurek /TiVo