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Electronic/Dance - Released April 3, 2020 | 4AD

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Having described it as “A quest for comfort, the search for a resting place”, it almost sounds like Canadian duo Purity Ring are searching for a place to die in their new album, but the title Womb, is instead more of an invitation to stay safe at home and enjoy the life we’ve been given. Megan James and Corin Roddick came out of the shadows in 2012 following the release of their album, Shrine, and have since been endorsed by the likes of Jon Hopkins and Danny Brown. Their artistic approach hasn’t changed all that much and their synthetic pop is still blossoming and finding its fullness and depth in this third studio album which may even surpass the work of their fellow compatriot Grimes, who has a similar style. Roddick’s production is as compelling as ever here and James, with her vocals sounding less and less human, is an expert in making catchy choruses. The duo from Edmonton have released a whole load of potential hits, (notably the ballad rubyinsides, built on layers upon layers of synthesizers, as well as the future pop in sinew and the single stardew), and shown great skill in this album. An amniotic haven that definitely lives up to our expectations. © Smaëm Bouaici/Qobuz
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Electronic/Dance - Released February 21, 2020 | 4AD

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Rising from the darkness of the Canadian rave scene at the start of the 2010s, Grimes quickly made her way up the ladder of success. Her synthetic hit Vanessa allowed her to amass a fanbase that was obsessed with her post-teenage voice and elfish look, and at the end of the 2010s, Pitchfork named Oblivion (written following a sexual assault and taken from her 2012 album Vision) the second-best song of the entire decade. It’s this kind of distinction that reminds us that she is an artist that knows exactly how to transcribe emotions into songs, and not just the girlfriend of multi-billionaire Elon Musk. Miss Anthropocene sees Grimes morph into a climate supervillain, a ‘goddess of plastic’ that’s here to take some of the heat off climate change. Musically, Grimes has not drastically changed, with a signature synth-pop sound that borrows from rock on My Name Is Dark, drum’n’bass on the excellent 4ÆM or trip-hop on So Heavy (I Fell Through the Earth), which reminds you of Massive Attack or Transglobal Underground. Well inspired, Grimes continues to hit the mark. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Electronic/Dance - Released February 21, 2020 | 4AD

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Rising from the darkness of the Canadian rave scene at the start of the 2010s, Grimes quickly made her way up the ladder of success. Her synthetic hit Vanessa allowed her to amass a fanbase that was obsessed with her post-teenage voice and elfish look, and at the end of the 2010s, Pitchfork named Oblivion (written following a sexual assault and taken from her 2012 album Vision) the second-best song of the entire decade. It’s this kind of distinction that reminds us that she is an artist that knows exactly how to transcribe emotions into songs, and not just the girlfriend of multi-billionaire Elon Musk. Miss Anthropocene sees Grimes morph into a climate supervillain, a ‘goddess of plastic’ that’s here to take some of the heat off climate change. Musically, Grimes has not drastically changed, with a signature synth-pop sound that borrows from rock on My Name Is Dark, drum’n’bass on the excellent 4ÆM or trip-hop on So Heavy (I Fell Through the Earth), which reminds you of Massive Attack or Transglobal Underground. Well inspired, Grimes continues to hit the mark. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz

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