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Solo Piano - Released October 11, 2007 | Mirare

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released September 2, 2008 | Mirare

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Classical - Released November 8, 2011 | Mirare

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The sensitive, subtle Bach interpretations of Sino-French pianist Zhu Xiao-Mei are among the finest available on a modern piano. It's a rare Bach specialist who can also deliver top-notch Mozart, but Zhu proves herself the exception with this very nice disc of varied Mozart pieces. She manages to deliver readings that are, all at the same time, idiomatic, original in conception, and technically awe-inspiring (listen to the pure, clean lines of Mozart's left-hand parts in one of the more contrapuntal works, like the Piano Sonata in D major, K. 576). "Did Mozart really change?" Zhu asks in text in the album's graphics. "Or did he not remain the same, walking through life without stopping, simple, joyful, freer and more profound than ever?" Her answer is that between the works of Mozart's early twenties and the ones composed right before he died (his last keyboard work, a short Andante for mechanical organ, is included) there is more in common than different, and she puts this across in her playing quite uncannily. Everything is controlled, and the performance is the classic type of closed-grand-piano affair, but joyous spontaneity of invention comes through even in seemingly light works like the 12 Variations in C major on "Aj! vous dirai-je, maman," K. 265 (the tune is otherwise known as "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star"). That piece does well at the brisk tempo Zhu gives it, but the same is not necessarily true of the Adagio in B minor, K. 540, one of Mozart's most profound keyboard works. Zhu turns it into a kind of quasi-recitative, but her tempo is hard to square with Mozart's tempo indication. That's about the only sticking point, however, on this highly recommended and often gripping release.
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Classical - Released April 9, 2010 | Mirare

Booklet
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Classical - Released May 19, 2017 | Accentus Music

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Classical - Released January 10, 2012 | Mirare

Booklet
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Classical - Released July 15, 2016 | Mirare

Booklet
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Classical - Released December 4, 2008 | Mirare

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Classical - Released October 30, 2015 | Accentus Music

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Classical - Released November 20, 2015 | Accentus Music

Chinese-French pianist Zhu Xiao-Mei is something of a Bach specialist, and her wonderful recording of Bach's swan song, Die Kunst der Fuge, BWV 1080 (The Art of the Fugue, not "the art of fugue" as it is translated here), is something of a summation of her work in the field. Zhu has few competitors nowadays in fully pianistic, Steinway grand interpretations, and her reading can stand comparison with the great piano versions of the past. She balances on the knife edge, making use of the full capabilities of the piano but not taking Bach a step out of his era. Zhu carefully builds up the work's macro structure, emphasizing the step-by-step development of the work's basic fugal material with piano articulation. As the great set of fugues proceeds, she introduces more expressive shading and complexity, in parallel with the mind-boggling developments in the music itself, and the final quadruple fugue, breaking off at the point of Bach's death, seems almost to break on through to the other side. The recording was made at Bach's own workplace: Leipzig's Thomaskirche. This is perhaps not where such a chamber work would have originally been performed, but the location adds an indefinable layer to the performance, perhaps one associated with the player's own reaction to the space. This is a recording that will continue to be richly rewarding over many hearings.
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Classical - Released May 27, 2016 | Accentus Music