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Country - Released July 9, 2012 | Southern Ground - Atlantic

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Country - Released November 7, 2014 | Atlantic Records

Greatest Hits So Far has a simple title and a simple execution: it rounds up the 14 singles the Zac Brown Band released between 2008 and 2013, presenting them in chronological order and containing no bonus material. There are a lot of hits here -- "Chicken Fried," "Toes," "Highway 20 Ride," "Free," "As She's Walking Away," "Colder Weather," "Knee Deep," and "Keep Me in Mind" all hit number one on Billboard's country charts, and most of the rest made it into the Top 10 -- and when they're combined in a collection, the overall effect is to push ZBB away from their (deserved) jam band associations and into the realm of sturdy craftsmen. Brown and his chief co-writer Wyatt Durette have a knack for full-blooded yet sensitive melodies reminiscent of the golden age of singer/songwriters, with many of the best songs ("Colder Weather," "As She's Walking Away") bearing an uncanny (and possibly unintended) similarity to the terrific and obscure songsmith B.W. Stevenson, along with James Taylor. This means Greatest Hits So Far underscores the band's timeless qualities: in addition to being a great live band, they're a hell of a singles band, too, creating songs that withstand hundreds of plays. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released May 12, 2017 | Southern Ground - Atlantic

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Country - Released April 28, 2015 | Zac Brown

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Nearly three years after Uncaged, which won the Grammy for Best Country Album, the Zac Brown Band unveiled the next chapter in their crossover country revolution. Uncaged was distinguished at least in part by the participation of a variety of guests including Jimmy Buffett, Alan Jackson, Trombone Shorty, Jason Mraz, and Amos Lee. Jekyll + Hyde doesn't forgo them altogether, but it does have fewer of them. Instead, ZBB double down on their commitment to deliver as many different kinds of songs as they possibly can. Whereas the Jay Joyce-produced first single, "Homegrown," is characteristic of the band's feel-good, home-and-heart, back-country groove, it's not nearly representative of everything that's here. Opener "Beautiful Drug" may feature a meld of acoustic guitars, banjos, and snare drums, but loops, synths, and a hook straight out of a Katy Perry single govern its flow. "Mango Tree" features Sara Bareilles in a guest performance as it attempts to re-create Nelson Riddle-esque big-band pop swing. It's followed by the rocker "Heavy Is the Head," with Soundgarden/Audioslave frontman Chris Cornell in duet with Brown. The metallic guitar is appended by a distorted bassline that comes right from the Geezer Butler playbook. The guest tunes are solid additions, but they're not the best things here. Those honors are reserved for the band's self-written tunes: "Remedy" weds country-gospel to a Celtic reel with multi-part vocal harmonies and finally to modern praise & worship; it's a clear standout. The Caribbean-tinged tunes such as "Loving You Easy," with its Buffett-esque groove wed to retro pop/soul and "One Day," with its sweeping yet earthy fiddle, horns, and stirring backing choruses, are both winners, too. "Tomorrow Never Comes" is almost a big-beat dance number with its ticking loops and electronic blips cutting through a bluegrass stomp. It's bracing in its audacity. Jason Isbell's poignant "Dress Blues" is more straightforward, wedding folk and pop-country in a poignant lyric about a fallen marine; the arrangement juxtaposes a gently whining pedal steel with an elegiac, languid fiddle. "Junkyard," a song about child abuse, is a slow, angry country-rocker with fat, muddy basses and guitars, and a Celtic interlude with drum loops that adds drama and tension before the tempo explodes. "I'll Be Your Man (Song for a Daughter)" is heartfelt, island-tinged folk-country. Its closing chorale is straight out of the Southern church. It should have closed the album, because "Widlfire" feels like filler and an acoustic version of "Tomorrow Never Comes" was unnecessary because it adds to the set's already unwieldy, hour-plus length. The only other nick is that the set's production is overly bright. These are niggling complaints, however. The stylistic range of Jekyll + Hyde proves that ZBB's reach is almost limitless, and this set will more than likely delight the group's legions of fans. ~ Thom Jurek
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Country - Released November 17, 2008 | Home Grown - Big Picture - Atlantic

Now that Jimmy Buffett has tried repositioning himself as a country artist by cutting duets with the likes of Alan Jackson, Kenny Chesney and Clint Black, it should come as no surprise that the Parrothead influence has begun making its way into Nashville, and the first major-label effort from Zac Brown features not one but two songs ("Toes" and "Where the Boat Leaves From") devoted to the joys of getting buzzed and playing music in some seaside locale with good weather. Seeing how most of the great names of country's formative era rarely if ever sang about vacationing (beyond spending the odd night in a honky-tonk), this is an interesting and somewhat puzzling development, though Brown and his band have embraced a canny range of marketable influences on The Foundation. "Chicken Fried" is a radio-friendly homage to country-as-lifestyle (including chicken fried steak, cold beer and supporting the troops), "It's Not OK" is a less-than-good-natured rant against some panhandler that will warm the hearts of Toby Keith fans, the "lite-funk with fiddle" groove of "Different Kind of Groove" suggests these guys have been listening to a lot of Dave Matthews, and "Highway 20 Ride" and "Free" show the influence of the more sentimental branches of the Texas Singer-Songwriter tradition (through the results are more Pat Green than Robert Earl Keen). Brown has a fine voice and he and his band are solid pickers who've polished these songs to a fine semi-gloss after a few thousand nights on the road, but there's a calculated air of "something for everyone" about The Foundation that doesn't sound eclectic so much as an effort to chase down as many demographics as possible. Brown and his partners are determined to sing something you're going to like, but The Foundation would be a bit more satisfying if more of it came from the heart instead of some sort of strategy session. ~ Mark Deming
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Country - Released May 3, 2010 | Southern Ground - Atlantic

Booklet
Although they’ve enjoyed commercial success with fine country singles like “Toes,” "Whatever It Is," and the infectious, laid-back classic anthem “Chicken Fried,” the Zac Brown Band are really all about their live shows, and this three-disc set (two discs of music plus a DVD) captures the reverent, communal feel of the band’s performances. Recorded at the Fox Theatre in Atlanta on October 30, 2009 as a benefit for Athens’ historic Georgia Theatre, the show features a host of guest stars, including Kid Rock on “Can’t You See,” Little Big Town on “Colder Weather,” and Shawn Mullins on “Toes,” as well as band performances of “Chicken Fried” and the group’s other key songs. What makes a Zac Brown Band show really work, though, is the way the band pays homage to its influences, and there are intelligent covers here of Paul McCartney’s “Blackbird,” Bob Dylan’s “I Shall Be Released,” Charlie Daniels' “The Devil Went Down to Georgia,” and the Band’s “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,” and fine segues from the country-reggae of “Where the Boat Leaves From” into Bob Marley’s “One Love” and from “Free” into Van Morrison’s “Into the Mystic.” It all flows naturally and easily, making this set a wonderful introduction to a very special band. ~ Steve Leggett
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Country - Released April 28, 2015 | Zac Brown

Nearly three years after Uncaged, which won the Grammy for Best Country Album, the Zac Brown Band unveiled the next chapter in their crossover country revolution. Uncaged was distinguished at least in part by the participation of a variety of guests including Jimmy Buffett, Alan Jackson, Trombone Shorty, Jason Mraz, and Amos Lee. Jekyll + Hyde doesn't forgo them altogether, but it does have fewer of them. Instead, ZBB double down on their commitment to deliver as many different kinds of songs as they possibly can. Whereas the Jay Joyce-produced first single, "Homegrown," is characteristic of the band's feel-good, home-and-heart, back-country groove, it's not nearly representative of everything that's here. Opener "Beautiful Drug" may feature a meld of acoustic guitars, banjos, and snare drums, but loops, synths, and a hook straight out of a Katy Perry single govern its flow. "Mango Tree" features Sara Bareilles in a guest performance as it attempts to re-create Nelson Riddle-esque big-band pop swing. It's followed by the rocker "Heavy Is the Head," with Soundgarden/Audioslave frontman Chris Cornell in duet with Brown. The metallic guitar is appended by a distorted bassline that comes right from the Geezer Butler playbook. The guest tunes are solid additions, but they're not the best things here. Those honors are reserved for the band's self-written tunes: "Remedy" weds country-gospel to a Celtic reel with multi-part vocal harmonies and finally to modern praise & worship; it's a clear standout. The Caribbean-tinged tunes such as "Loving You Easy," with its Buffett-esque groove wed to retro pop/soul and "One Day," with its sweeping yet earthy fiddle, horns, and stirring backing choruses, are both winners, too. "Tomorrow Never Comes" is almost a big-beat dance number with its ticking loops and electronic blips cutting through a bluegrass stomp. It's bracing in its audacity. Jason Isbell's poignant "Dress Blues" is more straightforward, wedding folk and pop-country in a poignant lyric about a fallen marine; the arrangement juxtaposes a gently whining pedal steel with an elegiac, languid fiddle. "Junkyard," a song about child abuse, is a slow, angry country-rocker with fat, muddy basses and guitars, and a Celtic interlude with drum loops that adds drama and tension before the tempo explodes. "I'll Be Your Man (Song for a Daughter)" is heartfelt, island-tinged folk-country. Its closing chorale is straight out of the Southern church. It should have closed the album, because "Widlfire" feels like filler and an acoustic version of "Tomorrow Never Comes" was unnecessary because it adds to the set's already unwieldy, hour-plus length. The only other nick is that the set's production is overly bright. These are niggling complaints, however. The stylistic range of Jekyll + Hyde proves that ZBB's reach is almost limitless, and this set will more than likely delight the group's legions of fans. ~ Thom Jurek
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Country - Released September 20, 2010 | Southern Ground - Atlantic

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Country - Released July 6, 2012 | Southern Ground - Atlantic

In a sense, it's possible to measure the progress of the Zac Brown Band by the magnitude of their guest stars. In 2010, they consolidated the breakthrough of 2008's Foundation by enlisting Jimmy Buffett and Alan Jackson for duets -- elders whose very presence suggested they were passing a torch (although, to be sure, Buffett has a far greater pull on Brown's sound than Jackson). Two years later, it is the Zac Brown Band who occupy the power position, drafting in peers, not idols, to play alongside. And it is a diverse batch: twee, twiddly Jason Mraz co-writes the sprightly opening cut, "Jump Right In," with Zac, Trombone Shorty colors "Overnight" with some New Orleans funk, and upcoming folk/blues troubadour Amos Lee sings on "Day That I Die," each guest representing a different field for the ZBB, each suggesting the range of this ever-evolving nominal country band. And at this point, the Zac Brown Band would fit the grander stages of such worldly, knowing vaguely hippie enclaves as Bonnaroo better than they would a rocking country outlet somewhere in the Deep South. But Southern they are, in sensibility and sound, reflecting not the dusty beer joints and cutthroat honky tonks of the middle of the 20th century but the sports bars and sandy beaches of the present, the kinds of places where the kin of the Allmans feel as Southern as the descendants of George Jones...and where a bearded soft rock crooner like Zac Brown is happy to make evident his debt to James Taylor. Brown's sweeter side isn't hidden here but it's not quite as prominent as it's been in the past, either. He has plenty of soft, crooning melodies but there's a bit of bluegrass and a bit of reggae, a little blues and a lot of rock. Above anything else, Uncaged is a Zac Brown Band album, one that emphasizes the range of this quintet and its elastic interplay. It is the sound of a band operating from a position of considerable strength: they're confident, assured, even playful, having fun bending the rules and blurring boundaries, eager to please but never pandering. It's the rare album that suggests how good the band would be in concert yet still sounds vibrant on record. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released January 11, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Country - Released May 12, 2017 | Southern Ground - Atlantic

Welcome Home is a telling title for the fifth album by the Zac Brown Band. It's a statement of comfort from the ZBB, letting fans who found the genre-bending experiments of the 2015 set Jekyll + Hyde disquieting know that the group has gotten back to basics. Such reassurances aren't limited to the record's name, either. Welcome Home begins with an ode to the Zac Brown Band's "Roots," before they tell listeners that they're the "Real Thing" in for the "Long Haul" -- and that's all within the first three songs! All of these proclamations of authenticity are set to the ZBB's trademark mellow vibe, a signature anchored in the smooth sounds of the '70s. The band whittles away any tendency toward jamming or adventures, so Welcome Home rolls easy, its gait quickening only when he revives the breezy beachside sway of "Toes" on "Start Over." Even that title offers something of an implicit promise to fans tempted to stray: the ZBB know they've roamed far from home, but they've returned and are ready to begin again. While the constant parade of country homilies gets a bit weary, the sound of Welcome Home is a warm, comfortable bath. Brown still has a way with a honeyed melody and his band is just as supple, meaning this album is the very definition of music as comfort food. Coziness certainly has its appeal -- it works as a balm and a tonic -- but it's hard to shake the feeling that the Zac Brown Band overplay their hand somewhat by insisting they've reconnected with their roots. All those lyrics feel calculated and defensive, undercutting the grace of the music. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - To be released September 20, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Country - Released September 20, 2010 | Southern Ground - Atlantic

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Country - Released May 28, 2015 | Home Grown - Big Picture - Atlantic

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Country - Released March 10, 2017 | Southern Ground - Elektra

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Country - Released April 7, 2017 | Southern Ground - Elektra

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Country - Released January 21, 2014 | Southern Ground - Atlantic

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Country - Released February 3, 2017 | Southern Ground - Elektra

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Country - Released May 3, 2017 | Southern Ground - Elektra

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Country - Released July 26, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC