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Country - Released November 13, 2015 | RCA Records Label Nashville

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He's had hits that rock a little and he hasn't been averse to buffing his country so it gleams like Luke Bryan, but Chris Young's ace in the hole has always been his ballads. So relaxed he seems broken-in, not lazy, Young never oversells either his heartbreak or seduction, a skill not every singer has. Wisely, Young and his collaborator Corey Crowder choose to spotlight the singer's softer side on I'm Coming Over, the first album the two produced solely together. There are some sunnier shifts of tone peppered throughout the album -- "Sunshine Overtime" is as cheerful as its title, "You Do the Talkin'" pulsates to crossover-friendly eighth notes, and "Heartbeat" opens the proceedings with a touch of urgency -- but the overall vibe of I'm Coming Over is so warm and slow that even the pounding Eric Church homage "Underdogs" winds up feeling subdued. This isn't a bug -- it's a feature: the strength of I'm Coming Over is its mellow assurance, to which Young adds a shade of gravity with his gravelly voice, a touch of down-home flair that never seems affected. While some early fans may wind up pining for the lingering traditionalism that characterized the launch of his career -- there's not so much as a feint toward twang, not even with Vince Gill sitting in on "Sober Saturday Night" -- there's little doubt that this softer, mainstream iteration of Chris Young not only suits him but spurs the singer to deliver the strongest album of his career. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released October 20, 2017 | RCA Records Label Nashville

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A decade into his career, Chris Young seems at least a decade older than his 32 years on Losing Sleep. This speaks of his ease, how he not only can expertly handle a ballad, but that he realizes slow-burning tunes are his specialty. Young veered in this direction on 2015's I'm Comin' Over, but Losing Sleep -- released just two years later -- makes it plain that he considers a mellow midtempo song his sweet spot. Unlike its predecessors, Young co-wrote every song on Losing Sleep, and if the songs aren't explicitly personal, they certainly telegraph what he considers his strengths. Melodic and relaxed, Young never raises a sweat on Losing Sleep, not even when the amplifiers are turned up -- as they are on the title track and its cousin "Radio and the Rain," where they don't provide riffs or rhythm, merely color. Everything on the album acts in support of the song, and that includes Young's vocals. He's sensitive and shaded, keeping his eye on the melody, but he leans into certain phrases so he can emphasize the song's overriding emotions. It's a subtle skill that suits this soft music, an album that doesn't make a big deal of its craft but succeeds precisely because of the work behind the scenes. Every element of Losing Sleep unfolds so easily, it feels inevitable, and it's so polished it can seem like nothing but mood music, but repeated plays reveal that this is more than atmosphere: the record endures because the songs work their way into the subconscious. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released September 16, 2013 | RCA Records Label Nashville

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Chris Young is a smart guy, smart enough to know which way the country winds are blowing in 2013. Positioned as a bit of a traditionalist ever since he won Nashville Star in 2005, Young now makes a modern move with 2013's A.M., brightening up his sound by leaning on cheerful, chipper pop hooks and a production so gleaming it shows his reflection; he has even chosen to smile on his album cover for the first time ever. Certainly, it's hard to shake the impression that Young has been rocked by the success of Luke Bryan, whose amiable bro-next-door party-hearty persona permeates every part of A.M. that isn't devoted to ballads. Those slow, sometimes melodramatic songs remain Young's specialty and although they're often somewhat glossier here than they've been before -- there's a greater emphasis on echoing guitars, the kind that can fill an arena -- they feel like they belong to an older, different artist than the one that's showcased on the rest of A.M., an album so steeped in modern vernacular that one of the centerpieces is a song called "Text Me Texas" (which, ironically enough, is perhaps the purest bit of country here). Such a radical shift in sensibility has been enough to derail careers, but at his core Young is a people pleaser so his new set of threads suits him well. His baritone lends heft to the rowdy party "Aw Naw," yet it's supple enough to sound sunny on "Hold You to It" or "Nothin' But the Cooler Left," a breezy ode to day-drinking. Young always seemed a shade too earnest on his earlier records so this unabashed embrace of country-pop -- one that wasn't necessarily pushed on him, based on the six co-writes he has here, almost all of them among the poppier material -- is at first a little startling but it winds up being the right direction for an artist whose greatest asset has always been his inherent likeability. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released October 20, 2017 | RCA Records Label Nashville

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Country - Released August 31, 2009 | RCA Records Label Nashville

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Country - Released July 11, 2011 | RCA Records Label Nashville

If Chris Young has a signature, it’s his plainspoken likableness. Not the flashiest of singers, Young certainly isn’t lacking in personality, something that goes a long way in distinguishing his clean commercial country. Walking a thin line between hard country and its sweeter pop cousin, Young sells hooks and sentimentality without pushing too hard, leaving just enough grit and twang to keep his country grounded. He perfects this trick on his third album, 2011’s Neon, a sturdy collection of tunes with no frills but plenty of appeal. Young often does slip into some sappiness, reminiscing about times spent fixing the car with his father over a “Flashlight” and remember words of wisdom from his granddaddy on “Old Love Feels Now,” yet his writer's eye for telling details and his conversational delivery prevent the tunes from getting treacly, a trait that also comes in handy on the love songs and heartbroken honky tonk, the latter providing such fine moments as the first single “Tomorrow” and the barroom ballad title track. That ease also surfaces on the livelier moments, when he lays back on the sunny “I Can Take It from There,” when he rides a bouncing backroads groove on “Lost,” and when he kicks up some serious twang on “Save Water, Drink Beer,” whose sense of humor recalls Brad Paisley. Unlike Paisley or other peers like Keith Urban and Blake Shelton, Chris Young has no grander ambitions than being a reliable pure country singer, one who aims to please without pandering, one who stays country without resisting the charms of a strong melody. If Neon does anything, it proves that Young can manage this delicate balance all the while seeming like it’s no trouble at all. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Ambient/New Age - Released October 14, 2016 | RCA Records Label Nashville

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Arriving six albums into Chris Young's career -- and not long after "I'm Comin' Over" gave him one of his biggest hits ever -- It Must Be Christmas capitalizes on the singer's penchant for crooning. His best songs were often ballads, and while the album includes a fair number of slow fireside tunes, such a warm, easy touch benefits relaxed secular classics like "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas." Young maintains this cozy vibe throughout It Must Be Christmas, although there winds up being a slight disconnect on the original tunes "Under the Weather," "There's a New Kid in Town," and "It Must Be Christmas," all fine numbers that are produced so they can slide onto contemporary country playlists in 2016. They feel like radio tunes, they don't feel seasonal, so they wind up sticking out on a collection that is designed for snowy nights. They may not quite fit but that's hardly enough to mar a collection that does everything a modern mainstream holiday album should do: it plays upon memories of Christmas while appealing to the moment at hand. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released January 4, 2019 | RCA Records Label Nashville

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Country - Released September 30, 2006 | RCA Records Label Nashville

Here it is: the debut album by the winner of 2005's Nashville Star competition. His prize was a contract with RCA Nashville. Given the music biz hype surrounding the show, it's no secret that his first single "Drinkin' Me Lonely," was a hit and garnered lots of interest at radio. But there's another reason for that, too: it's a great tune -- and it was self-penned. But that's really just the beginning. Chris Young has one of those classic country voices that is memorable after one hears it the first time, like Keith Whitley, George Strait, Clint Black, and Ronnie Milsap. The record opens with "Beer or Gasoline," a loud country rocker, and slips effortlessly into "You're Gonna Love Me," a straightforward up-tempo country love song. By the time "Drinkin' Me Lonely'" comes up on the player, the album is in full swing. It's a song Merle Haggard would have been proud to write. Other notable cuts here include the rollicking wildness of "Lay It on Me," and the slippery love song "Center of My World." There are plenty of bad boy rockers to accompany the ballads, which makes for an auspicious debut. The only complaint is Buddy Cannon's production. It's so huge and compressed it makes the album sound generic even if the songs aren't -- fiddles sound more like synths, the guitars all sound like they were recorded the late '70s, and the drums all have so much reverb on them, they sound more like programmed beats than an actual drumkit. The production will date this record instead of making it sound timeless like the great country albums that Young seems to adore given his classic writing style. Still, it's a first record, and Young is the real thing. It's no fluke he won the competition, and from the sound of this set, he's in it for the long haul. ~ Thom Jurek
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Country - Released June 14, 2019 | RCA Records Label Nashville

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Miscellaneous - Released February 2, 2007 | Nicetown Entertainment

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Miscellaneous - Released September 21, 2007 | Nicetown Entertainment

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Miscellaneous - Released September 2, 2013 | Nicetown Entertainment

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2007 | Roc-a-fella Records - Shawn Carter

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Miscellaneous - Released March 5, 2007 | Nicetown Entertainment

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Miscellaneous - Released September 26, 2008 | Nicetown Entertainment

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Miscellaneous - Released May 19, 2010 | Nicetown Entertainment

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Miscellaneous - Released August 13, 2008 | Nicetown Entertainment

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Miscellaneous - Released November 20, 2010 | Nicetown Entertainment

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Miscellaneous - Released July 19, 2009 | Nicetown Entertainment