Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

Alternative & Indie - Released December 1, 2014 | Matador

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Download not available
From
CD$11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released April 22, 1997 | Matador

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD$3.24

Alternative & Indie - Released October 9, 2020 | Matador

Yo La Tengo is a strange group. They’ve been around since the 80s and despite not exhibiting much in the way of musical genius they’re incredibly endearing. It’s probably down to their cultured outlook and hard-working attitude. The trio have always found it easier digesting influences (the likes of The Byrds and The Velvet Underground) than being influential themselves. Their discography is full of covers. In fact, it’s when they’re drawing from others that Yo La Tengo do it best. Sleepless is another record with five covers and one original track. These songs were released in a limited edition in 2019 for the Japanese artist Yoshitomo Nara's exhibition. The covers range from the Delmore Brothers (a 1950s bluegrass band) to The Byrds, Dylan, Ronnie Lane and The Flying Machine. Sometimes covered in a noisy rock version (a clear Velvet Underground influence) Yo La Tengo reveal their bucolic side here with acoustic guitars, vocal harmonies and relaxed country atmospheres (a Byrds influence). It’s nothing new or essential, but it’s as soft and comfortable as that old chequered shirt you’ve had since 1992 and wear once a year. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz
From
CD$11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 28, 2015 | Matador

From
CD$11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released February 22, 2000 | Matador

From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 16, 2018 | Matador

Hi-Res
It’s a cotton revolution for Yo La Tengo. After Stuff Like That There (2015), in which they smoothly revisited tracks of their own or from others, this fifteenth album feels much more sedated. Led since 1986 by the couple Ira Kaplan and Georgia Hubley, the band are reunited here in a trio with bassist James McNew, and goes into a quiet and peaceful hibernation. The boiled down instrumentation navigates here and there on Shoegazian vapours (What Chance Have I Got, Dream Dream Away), towards tender folk strings (She May, She Might) and bossa backwashes (Esportes Casual), even sleeping under the Tropics (Polynesia #1). Maracas, warm and slow percussions, low and soft voices, bass in slow motion, and whispering guitars draw up a meditative opus, closer to Alice Coltrane than the mad and poisonous funk of Sly & The Family Stone’s There’s A Riot Going On (1971). © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$4.46
CD$3.24

Alternative & Indie - Released July 17, 2020 | Matador

Hi-Res
From
CD$11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 2, 1995 | Matador

After the noisy but dream-like drift of Painful, Electr-O-Pura found Yo La Tengo in livelier and more outwardly enthusiastic form; while they had hardly abandoned their more subdued and contemplative side, as evidenced by the lovely "The Hour Grows Late" and "Pablo and Andrea," they seemed eager to once again explore the grittier textures they'd unearthed on President Yo La Tengo and May I Sing With Me with tunes like the gleefully manic "False Ending" and the bizarre horn-blasted "Attack on Love." Yo La Tengo also served up one of the most perfectly realized pop tunes in their repertoire with "Tom Courtenay" (which not only name checks the Beatles, but boasts a tune the Fab Four would have been happy to come up with themselves), and revisited the concept of the noisy groove jam (which they pioneered on "The Evil That Men Do (Pablo's Version)") with the acetone-powered "False Alarm" and the joyous "Blue Line Swinger." Throughout, Ira Kaplan's simple but forceful guitar lines, Georgia Hubley's steady, subtly inventive drumming, and James McNew's solid, supportive bass add up to a group that prizes intelligence and imagination over flash, and makes it work over and over. Few bands have consistently better ideas than Yo La Tengo, and they make 14 of them work like a charm on Electr-O-Pura. (By the way, those incongruous comments about the songs were lifted from an obscure book on the Blues Project, and don't trust those timings on the back cover -- they're deliberately inaccurate.) © Mark Deming /TiVo
From
CD$11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 5, 1993 | Matador

From
CD$15.99

Alternative & Indie - Released November 18, 2013 | Matador

From
CD$11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 11, 2006 | Matador

From
CD$11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 14, 2013 | Matador

From
CD$11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released April 8, 2003 | Matador

From
CD$1.79

Alternative & Indie - Released August 26, 2020 | Matador

From
CD$11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 8, 2009 | Matador

Whether or not Yo La Tengo are being tongue in cheek with the title of their 14th album, Popular Songs does find Hoboken's finest embracing pop song structures with a renewed degree of enthusiasm -- this isn't quite the Yo La Tengo "loaded with hits" album, but for a band that's shown an increasing willingness to explore the outer limits of its music in the studio, Popular Songs features nine tunes you can hum along with and sometimes even dance to. Those who got high marks in math will notice that Popular Songs has 12 selections, and as befits a band that covered George McCrae's "You Can Have It All," on the second half of this set YLT take the opportunity to stretch out and invite the spirit for a while -- the total time of the first nine tracks on Popular Songs is roughly the same as the last three, which should tell you something about the album's dual nature. "Periodically Double or Triple" and "If It's True" in the first half are two of the most user-friendly songs this band has recorded in quite some time, the former a playfully funky R&B number with a killer bassline and the latter a slice of sweet uptown soul complete with a Hammond B-3 and a polished string section, while "I'm on My Way" and "All Your Secrets" are low-key but beautifully crafted examples of smart pop for grownups that won't insult your intelligence or your imagination. If "By Two's" and "Here to Fall" reflect YLT's trippier inclinations, the melodies give them a firmer backbone than many of their previous gestures in this direction, and "Nothing to Hide" is a bracing and joyous dose of rock & roll. The first half of the album is smart enough and strong enough that the final three cuts almost seem like a letdown; "More Stars Than There Are in Heaven" is lovely, but sounds like a rehash of the ideas the band worked out so well on And Then Nothing Turned Itself Inside-Out, and the minimalist acoustic guitar textures of "The Fireside" are almost too fragile to support its 11-minute length. Popular Songs closes with the usual Ira Kaplan guitar freakout; "And the Glitter Is Gone" is a fine plunge into the valley of skronk, with Georgia Hubley and James McNew bashing away with equal fervor and giving this album a typical but rousing finale. But as fine as those nearly 16 minutes of controlled chaos are, it's the first half of Popular Songs that you're more likely to come back to, where by thinking in a small space Yo La Tengo have challenged themselves a bit and beautifully risen to the occasion. © Mark Deming /TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released June 7, 2011 | Egon Records

From
CD$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 10, 1996 | Matador

From
CD$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released February 21, 1992 | Alias

From
CD$11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released June 18, 1996 | Matador

From
CD$8.99

Rock - Released September 1, 1995 | Bar - None Records