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Progressive Rock - Released January 14, 2003 | Rhino - Elektra

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Progressive Rock - Released May 28, 2013 | Rhino Atlantic

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Rock - Released January 14, 2003 | Rhino - Elektra

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Yes

Progressive Rock - Released September 17, 2013 | Rhino Atlantic

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Progressive Rock - Released August 2, 1994 | Rhino - Elektra

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Fragile was Yes' breakthrough album, propelling them in a matter of weeks from a cult act to an international phenomenon; not coincidentally, it also marked the point where all of the elements of the music (and more) that would define their success for more than a decade fell into place fully formed. The science-fiction and fantasy elements that had driven the more successful songs on their preceding record, The Yes Album, were pushed much harder here, and not just in the music but in the packaging of the album: the Roger Dean-designed cover was itself a fascinating creation that seemed to relate to the music and drew the purchaser's attention in a manner that few records since the heyday of the psychedelic era could match. Having thrown original keyboard player Tony Kaye overboard early in the sessions -- principally over his refusal to accept the need for the Moog synthesizer in lieu of his preferred Hammond organ -- the band welcomed Rick Wakeman into its ranks. His use of the Moog, among other instruments, coupled with an overall bolder and more aggressive style of playing, opened the way for a harder, hotter sound by the group as a whole; bassist Chris Squire sounds like he's got his amp turned up to "12," and Steve Howe's electric guitars are not far behind, although the group also displayed subtlety where it was needed. The opening minute of "Roundabout," the album opener -- and the basis for the edited single that would reach number 13 on the Billboard charts and get the group onto AM radio in a way that most other prog rock outfits could only look upon with envy -- was dominated by Howe's acoustic guitar and Bill Bruford's drums, and only in the middle section did the band show some of what they could do with serious amperage. Elsewhere on the record, as on "South Side of the Sky," they would sound as though they were ready to leave the ground (and the planet), between the volume and intensity of their playing. "Long Distance Runaround," which also served as the B-side of the single, was probably the most accessible track here apart from "Roundabout," but they were both ambitious enough to carry most listeners on to the heavier sides at the core of this long-player. The solo tracks by the members were actually a necessity: they needed to get Fragile out in a hurry to cover the cost of the keyboards that Wakeman had added to the group's sonic arsenal. But they ended up being more than filler. Each member, in effect, took a "bow" in mostly fairly serious settings, and Squire's "The Fish" and Howe's "Mood for a Day" pointed directly to future, more substantial projects as well as taking on a life of their own on-stage. If not exactly their peak, Fragile was as perfect a record as the group would ever make, and just as flawless in its timing as its content. ~ Bruce Eder
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Progressive Rock - Released May 7, 2013 | Rhino Atlantic

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Progressive Rock - Released September 13, 1972 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Yes had fallen out of critical favor with Tales from Topographic Oceans, a two-record set of four songs that reviewers found indulgent. But they had not fallen out of the Top Ten, and so they had little incentive to curb their musical ambitiousness. Relayer, released 11 months after Tales, was a single-disc, three-song album, its music organized into suites that alternated abrasive, rhythmically dense instrumental sections featuring solos for the various instruments with delicate vocal and choral sections featuring poetic lyrics devoted to spiritual imagery. Such compositions seemed intended to provide an interesting musical landscape over which the listener might travel, and enough Yes fans did that to make Relayer a Top Ten, gold-selling hit, though critics continued to complain about the lack of concise, coherent song structures. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Rock - Released January 29, 2008 | Rhino - Elektra

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Progressive Rock - Released December 19, 1980 | Rhino Atlantic

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Progressive Rock - Released September 7, 2018 | Eagle Rock Entertainment

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Celebrating their 50th anniversary, this 12-track set features a number of Yes' biggest hits and fan favorites. Recorded live at the Apollo Theater in Manchester, England, original members Jon Anderson, Trevor Rabin, and Rick Wakeman work through tracks such as "Roundabout" and "I've Seen All Good People," among others. ~ Rich Wilson
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Progressive Rock - Released August 2, 2019 | Rhino

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Yes celebrated their 50th anniversary with a tour through America and Europe, one that is commemorated on Rhino's 2019 set 50 Live. Recorded over two July nights in Philadelphia, 50 Live touches upon material written throughout the band's history but it adheres most closely to the prog rock that made their name in the early '70s. The set is anchored by classics -- "Close to the Edge" opens the album," "Starship Trooper" ends it, with "Yours Is No Disgrace" and "Roundabout" arriving elsewhere -- and the newer material is in the same vein (in other words, there is no "Owner of a Lonely Heart" or "Leave It"). Considering how the 2018 lineup is directed by guitarist Steve Howe, this shouldn't be a surprise, and it has to be said that this incarnation -- which features Howe, Geoff Downes, Alan White, Billy Sherwood, and vocalist Jon Davison, who joined the band in 2012 -- does this sound justice, which makes the album precisely what it's intended to be: a celebration of a particular time and sound, delivered with affection and skill. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Progressive Rock - Released June 29, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

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Rock - Released January 28, 2008 | Rhino - Elektra

Going for the One is perhaps the most overlooked item in the Yes catalog. It marked Rick Wakeman's return to the band after a three-year absence, and also a return to shorter song forms after the experimentalism of Close to the Edge, Tales from Topographic Oceans, and Relayer. In many ways, this disc could be seen as the follow-up to Fragile. Its five tracks still retain mystical, abstract lyrical images, and the music is grand and melodic, the vocal harmonies perfectly balanced by the stinging guitar work of Steve Howe, Wakeman's keyboards, and the solid rhythms of Alan White and Chris Squire. The title track features Howe on steel guitar (he's the only prog rocker who bothers with the instrument). "Turn of the Century" and the album's single, "Wonderous Stories," are lovely ballads the way only Yes can do them. "Parallels" is the album's big, pompous song, so well done that in later years the band opened concerts with it. Wakeman's stately church organ, recorded at St. Martin's Church, Vevey, Switzerland, sets the tone for this "Roundabout"-ish track. The concluding "Awaken" is the album's nod to the extended suite. Again, the lyrics are spacy in the extreme, but Jon Anderson and Squire are dead-on vocally, and the addition of Anderson's harp and White's tuned percussion round out this evocative track. ~ Ross Boissoneau
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Progressive Rock - Released November 11, 2013 | Rhino Atlantic

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Rhino reissued expanded versions of all the Yes albums in the early days of the new millennium, so this 2013 set doesn't see either a massive sonic upgrade or expansion. Instead, those acclaimed remasters -- including the expansion of Big Generator, which hadn't seen U.S. release prior to this -- are now packaged in mini-LP cardboard sleeves and put into a box with new artwork designed by Roger Dean. Apart from the art, this may not offer hardcore Yes fans anything they don't already have -- that's assuming they didn't opt to purchase an import of Big Generator in the first place -- but this is an easy, attractive, and relatively affordable way to get the band's core catalog in one fell swoop. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released January 14, 2003 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released June 1, 1983 | Rhino Atlantic

A stunning self-reinvention by a band that many had given up for dead, 90125 is the album that introduced a whole new generation of listeners to Yes. Begun as Cinema, a new band by Chris Squire and Alan White, the project grew to include the slick production of Trevor Horn, the new blood (and distinctly '80s guitar sound) of Trevor Rabin, and eventually the trademark vocals of returning founder Jon Anderson. His late entry insured that Rabin and Horn had a heavy influence on the sound. The album also marked the return of prodigal keyboardist Tony Kaye, whose crisp synth work on "Changes" marked the band's definitive break with its art rock roots. "Owner of a Lonely Heart" was a huge crossover hit, and its orchestral break has been relentlessly sampled by rappers ever since. The vocal harmonies of "Leave It" and the beautifully sprawling "Hearts" are additional high points, but there's nary a duff track on the album. ~ Paul Collins
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Progressive Rock - Released June 24, 2013 | Rhino Atlantic

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In many ways, the extravagance of this package equates the profligacy of the prog rock combo themselves. After all, how else but on a triple-LP collection could one hope to re-create -- or merely contain -- an adequate sampling of Yes' live presentation? Especially since their tunes typically clocked in in excess of ten minutes. Although they had turned in five studio long-players, the vast majority of Yessongs (1973) is drawn from their three most recent endeavors The Yes Album (1970), Fragile (1971), and Close to the Edge (1972). There are two exceptions, the first being the "Opening (Excerpt from "Firebird Suite")" -- which comes from the 1969 Boston Symphony Orchestra's recording, conducted by Seiji Ozawa. The other is Rick Wakeman's keyboard solo "Excerpts from 'The Six Wives Of Henry VIII'." Yes had just undergone a personnel change shortly after concluding work on Close to the Edge as Bill Bruford (percussion) left to join King Crimson in July of 1972. Bruford can be heard on "Perpetual Change," as well as the medley of "Long Distance Runaround" and "The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus)." Enthusiasts keen on various and arguably irrelevant minutia should note the spelling of "praimaturus" as credited on Yessongs. It is slightly different from Fragile, which is denoted as "praematurus." That bit of trivia aside, the new lineup finds Alan White (drums), quite ably filling Bruford's shoes, alongside Jon Anderson (vocals), Steve Howe (guitars), Chris Squire (bass/vocals), and Rick Wakeman (keyboards). One of their trademarks has always been an ability to re-create their often densely layered sound in concert. They effortlessly pull off the tricky chord progressions and changes in time signatures of "Siberian Khatru" and a sublime "Heart of the Sunrise," which unquestionably bests the dexterity of its carefully crafted studio counterpart. Both Howe and Squire's respective solos during "The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus)" are highlights as they give the entire unit an opportunity to show off their capacity for dramatic dynamics. The remainder of Yessongs is similarly strong, particularly the note-perfect "Close to the Edge," and the inspired concluding instrumental jam during "Starship Trooper." However, one criticism that can be leveled at the entire Yessongs release is the less than optimal audio quality throughout. The sound is generally muddy with no real fidelity to speak of and an even less precise stereoscape. But until someone goes back to the multi-tracks and remixes them for 21st century ears, this is as good as it gets when documenting Yes during this seminal transition period. ~ Lindsay Planer
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Rock - Released January 28, 2008 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released July 28, 2003 | Rhino - Elektra

All of the hits are here, just as they are on every Yes compilation. There are numerous edited versions for either radio or for singles, such as on "America," "It Can Happen," "The Calling," and "Homeworld." In addition, there is a remixed version of "Big Generator" that adds nothing to the original. Disc three offers three acoustic tracks in versions of "Roundabout" and "South Side of the Sky," with a solo Steve Howe six-string read of "Australia." ~ Thom Jurek
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Progressive Rock - Released June 29, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

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In 2013, in addition to his many recording and remixing projects, Steven Wilson remixed a sizable chunk of the Yes catalog. Interestingly, he didn't proceed chronologically, but by using an inner aesthetic that has become his trademark through previous projects with King Crimson and Jethro Tull. In 2013, he completed 1972's Close to the Edge; in 2014, he did a stellar job on 1974's Relayer (arguably never properly heard until this mix) and 1971's The Yes Album. The following year it was 1972's Fragile, and in 2016, 1973's double-length Tales from Topographic Oceans. These high-resolution remixes were previously available only on Blu-ray and DVD (while the conventional CDs contained 16/44.1 resolution mixes). In commemoration of Yes' 50th anniversary, Rhino has boxed and re-released all of these titles on vinyl. According to Wilson, they have used the 24/96 hi-res, DVD-A/Blu-ray mixes for each LP. The outer housing of the package features artwork created specifically for this set by original album artist Roger Dean -- whose work has been synonymous with the band's identity for more than 40 years. Additionally, two of these albums – Close to the Edge and Tales from Topographic Oceans -- feature brand-new cover art, while the remaining three covers were reworked by Dean. ~ Thom Jurek