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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 25, 2007 | RCA Records Label

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 17, 2019 | Mass Appeal

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 3, 2019 | Sanctuary Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 13, 2017 | eOne Music

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2017's The Saga Continues is billed as a Wu-Tang album, and plenty of major and minor members of the Wu-Tang family are on board for the project, but it's not until you read the liner notes that you find out who the real star of this show is. Mathematics, the MC-turned-DJ who learned the ropes of production from RZA and is said to have designed the Wu-Tang's W logo, produced and co-wrote all 18 tracks on The Saga Continues, and he's learned to replicate the sound of Wu-Tang's classic era with impressive accuracy. He doesn't quite equal the scratchy tension of RZA's peak-period work, but Mathematics fills The Saga Continues with dark, moody beats, atmospheric keyboard patches, snatches of classic soul sides, and samples from vintage kung-fu movies. If this isn't quite a brother to Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers), it at least seems like a first cousin, and Mathematics brings his A game on The Saga Continues. Too bad that can't be said for all the MCs on the album. While the cast includes Method Man, Ghostface Killah, Raekwon, Killa Priest, Redman, RZA, and Cappadonna, it often sounds like they were saving their best verses for one of their own albums, and the rhymes often seem scattershot, without giving the album the sharp focus it needs. And though many of the skits on The Saga Continues deal with the raw deal regularly handed to African-American men in the black community as well as in American society at large, the standard-issue braggadocio of most of the lyrics undercuts whatever message Mathematics and executive producer RZA had in mind. As a Wu-Tang album, The Saga Continues is good but not great, but it's a fine calling card for Mathematics, and makes the case that he should be given an album of his own more often. ~ Mark Deming
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 8, 1999 | LOUD Records

By the time the Wu-Tang Clan finished their first round of solo projects and reconvened for their second album as a group, the double-disc album had become the hip-hop fad of the moment. So why not give it a shot? With a main crew of nine MCs (plus new protégé Cappadonna), the Wu wouldn't have to depend heavily on guest appearances to flesh out two whole discs of material, as Biggie and 2Pac had. While the result, Wu-Tang Forever, is frequently brilliant, it's also sprawling and unfocused, losing its handle on the carefully controlled chaos of Enter the Wu-Tang. On the one hand, there's more social consciousness on Wu-Tang Forever, taking hard looks at ghetto life while finding pathos and offering encouragement and uplift ("A Better Tomorrow," "Impossible"). On the other hand, you also get some of the group's most explicit sex raps yet ("Maria," "The Projects," the utterly bizarre ODB solo track "Dog Shit"). In other words, the group is starting to go off in more individual directions here, making it harder to maintain an overall focus. Once you get past the rambling Five Percenter introduction, the first disc is pretty tight, partly because it was kept short to leave room for enhanced CD content. The second disc is far too long, diluting the impact of its better songs (the terrific single "Triumph") with an excess of lackluster material. Wu-Tang Forever easily would have made a brilliant single CD; RZA's production is more polished than the debut, thanks to a bigger budget and better equipment, and leans heavily on soundtrack-style strings to underscore the album's cinematic scope. Some hailed Wu-Tang Forever as the best double-disc hip-hop album yet released, but others regarded it as a disappointment; despite its many high points, it's the first time the Wu didn't quite fulfill their ambitions. ~ Steve Huey
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 29, 2013 | Columbia - Legacy

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 21, 2000 | LOUD Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 26, 2004 | SBME Strategic Marketing Group

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 13, 2017 | eOne Music

Hi-Res Booklet
2017's The Saga Continues is billed as a Wu-Tang album, and plenty of major and minor members of the Wu-Tang family are on board for the project, but it's not until you read the liner notes that you find out who the real star of this show is. Mathematics, the MC-turned-DJ who learned the ropes of production from RZA and is said to have designed the Wu-Tang's W logo, produced and co-wrote all 18 tracks on The Saga Continues, and he's learned to replicate the sound of Wu-Tang's classic era with impressive accuracy. He doesn't quite equal the scratchy tension of RZA's peak-period work, but Mathematics fills The Saga Continues with dark, moody beats, atmospheric keyboard patches, snatches of classic soul sides, and samples from vintage kung-fu movies. If this isn't quite a brother to Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers), it at least seems like a first cousin, and Mathematics brings his A game on The Saga Continues. Too bad that can't be said for all the MCs on the album. While the cast includes Method Man, Ghostface Killah, Raekwon, Killa Priest, Redman, RZA, and Cappadonna, it often sounds like they were saving their best verses for one of their own albums, and the rhymes often seem scattershot, without giving the album the sharp focus it needs. And though many of the skits on The Saga Continues deal with the raw deal regularly handed to African-American men in the black community as well as in American society at large, the standard-issue braggadocio of most of the lyrics undercuts whatever message Mathematics and executive producer RZA had in mind. As a Wu-Tang album, The Saga Continues is good but not great, but it's a fine calling card for Mathematics, and makes the case that he should be given an album of his own more often. ~ Mark Deming
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 18, 2017 | Eagle Rock Entertainment

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 28, 2014 | Asylum - Warner Bros.

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Released along with Once Upon a Time in Shaolin -- their locked-down, $5 million dollar, single-copy album-as-art release -- A Better Tomorrow is further proof that, in 2014, the Wu-Tang Clan are a concept or collective led by RZA, and not necessarily a group. Their previous 2007 effort, 8 Diagrams, was the first clue that things would never be the same post-Ol' Dirty Bastard, but they could be quite good, excellent even, as long as one doesn't expect the lean, mean Shaolin machine of the past. Like 8 Diagrams, A Better Tomorrow seemed quite unlikely to see release with key member Raekwon being a vocal holdout, and here, the festival circuit, post-ODB Wu-Tang rolls on with little of that holdout's help. Member Ghostface Killah is here less than usual as well, and when he's in control of a cut, be brings in his frequent solo collaborator Adrian Younge, like on "Crushed Egos," but it's a highlight where RZA dives in fully, as if Ghostface's noir LP Twelve Reasons to Die was a co-branded Bobby Digital effort. Insiders and longtime fans will get the drift, while everyone else has the group's early albums for an intro, but solid, crossover appeal still comes in the form of the singles "Keep Watch" (a supreme, electro-powered Wu-Robot), "Ron O'Neal" (an organic, Roots-flavored funkster), and "Ruckus in B Minor" (a punchy history of the group with Rick Rubin adding some "99 Problems"-styled co-production). Backing up these frontline stunners are weighty album cuts like "Miracle," where the group go big, ballad, and emo, which causes Ghostface to confess "since mama died, I never wild out," then the rickety "Necklace" successfully adds indie rap to the LP's many flavors, along with some venom and teeth. RZA executive produces to perfection, and somehow, orders this diverse, 15-song track list into a sensible flow. Don't call it a comeback, call it a collective, or a compilation from solo artists who sound enthused to be back with an especially inspired RZA as ringleader. ~ David Jeffries
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 28, 2014 | Asylum - Warner Bros.

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 18, 2001 | LOUD Records

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Pop - Released December 5, 2000 | Epic

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 18, 2008 | LOUD - Legacy

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While the Wu-Tang Clan's fans are loyal, they do expect their underground heroes to be virtuous and are the first to point out unnecessary releases. They might want to let this one slip since the Legacy's label's 2008 release Wu: The Story of the Wu-Tang Clan is not only a fairly well chosen set but a soundtrack to the documentary of the same name, allowing viewers both a quick souvenir and primer before they explore further. Four mammoth classics kick off the release, sequenced in a brilliant way for maximum fist-pumping. Next, two B-list repeats from the 2004 comp Legend of the Wu-Tang Clan appear before the solo releases are explored, beginning with Raekwon's great "Incarcerated Scarfaces." From Ol' Dirty Bastard's party starter "Shimmy Shimmy Ya" to the closing jump track "Gravel Pit," the flow is rough, but the two excuses to choose from are the soundtrack one and the difficult, sprawling discography compilers have to deal with, especially when solo releases count. The disc barely even touches upon the group's long list of affiliates -- a smart move since this isn't a box set -- so instead of being a selling point, the word "Story" on the cover is only repeating the documentary's title. Even so, this disjointed set of tunes from the core members would sell anyone on the magic of the Wu. Hardcore fans will find it redundant and should go straight to the film. ~ David Jeffries
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 22, 2017 | eOne Music

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 14, 1992 | RCA - Legacy

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 15, 2017 | eOne Music

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