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Alternative & Indie - Released June 4, 2021 | Dirty Hit - RCA Records

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Perhaps the most exciting rock band in the UK right now, Wolf Alice prove they're ready for the summer festival season with their third album—the follow-up to the London four-piece's Mercury Prize-winning Visions of a Life. Right off, they let you know with "The Beach" and its slow build that swells and crashes like, well, storm waves on the beach. This isn't surf rock—more a show of the unpredictable and overwhelming elements—but it's as evocative as they come, positively waning at the end. A similar trick is used on "Delicious Things," a gentle shuffle that breaks wide open into a glorious expanse and heavenly chorus. Singer Ellie Rowsell sings the verses with a sneaky little melody (hints of early Lily Allen here) and slightly hushed delivery, like she's gleefully speaking into the phone with her hand covering her mouth—both to hide her smile and keep a secret. "I'm in the Hollywood Hills … if you're up popping pills you know I won't say no," she sings, her delightful British pronunciation of "Los Angeleees" making the place sound like Mecca. Elsewhere, she takes no shit: "Don't call me mad/ There's a difference, I'm angry/ And your choice to call me cute has offended me," she spits against a bottom-heavy groove. Call it a resistance to how, still, today, female musicians are being pigeonholed. "Play the Greatest Hits" finds her using a bratty playground chant to keep up with the rumbling bass, speeding guitar and drums—the whole irresistible thing sounding like the wheels could come off at any second. (If this song were a car, flames would be shooting out the tailpipe.) There are other enchanting surprises. The catchy, hypnotic "Safe from Heartbreak" is almost ABBA-like, while "No Hard Feelings" plays a gentle, campfire melody. "Feeling Myself" starts off comedown-slow, then turns majestic, and Rowsell draws out the verses of "How Can I Make It OK?” like honey dripping from one syllable to the next, before switching to a crisp staccato for the chorus. And power ballad "The Last Man on Earth" is a stunner. Rowsell has said the lyrics are about "the arrogance of humans," and her words cut like a hot knife: “And every book you take and you dust from the shelf / Has lines between lines between lines / That you read about yourself ... You were the first person here and the last man on earth / But does a light shine on you?" © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 29, 2017 | Dirty Hit - RCA Records

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Wolf Alice mastered the glossy and grungy sides of alt-rock on My Love Is Cool, with songs like "Bros" and "Moaning Lisa Smile" earning them accolades that included a Grammy nomination. On Visions of a Life, they explore the wider -- and sometimes wilder -- facets of their music. To that end, they recruited producer Justin Meldal-Johnsen, who toured with the famously chameleonic Beck as his musical director and bassist, and also produced albums for acts as disparate as M83, Paramore, and the Raveonettes. With his help, Wolf Alice both narrow and widen their focus, isolating their bratty, fizzy guitar-pop on "Yuk Foo," "Space & Time," and "Beautifully Unconventional," and delving into the trippier side of their music on "Formidable Cool," "Sadboy," and the title track, which flirts with prog and metal in its ambitious sweep. While these songs reaffirm that Wolf Alice can pull off almost any style of music, Visions of a Life's most convincing moments build on My Love Is Cool's forays into dream pop. Inspired by a late friend of the band, the aptly named opener "Heavenward" is so gorgeous that it's tempting to want Wolf Alice to concentrate on this side of their music in the future. Similarly, "Planet Hunter" and "St. Purple & Green" are potent reminders of just how well the band does huge moments, while Ellie Roswell's whispers bring intimacy to love's euphoric beginnings on "Don't Delete the Kisses" and its rocky end on "Sky Musings." A reflection of a young band trying out all its possibilities, Visions of a Life is more scattered than My Love Is Cool, but its best songs hint at even more potential. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 23, 2015 | Dirty Hit - RCA Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 5, 2016 | Dirty Hit - RCA Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 14, 2013 | Dirty Hit - RCA Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 15, 2014 | Dirty Hit Ltd

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 20, 2018 | Dirty Hit

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 16, 2018 | Dirty Hit - RCA Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 2, 2018 | Dirty Hit - RCA Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 5, 2017 | Dirty Hit - RCA Records

Alternative & Indie - Released September 11, 2015 | Dirty Hit - RCA Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 29, 2018 | Dirty Hit - RCA Records