Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$8.99

Latin America - Released January 1, 1968 | Fania

HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

World - Released January 1, 1972 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res
CD$12.99

Latin America - Released February 26, 2008 | Fania

One of the finest salseros to ever grace the stage, Willie Colón has contributed hundreds of compositions to the Latin music songbook, 16 of which are included on the Fania-issued Greatest Hits. Though it's certainly not an all-inclusive compilation, Greatest Hits gives a very good overview of Colón's body of work, from his hard-driving salsa ("La Murga," "Che Che Cole") to his lighter, poppier pieces ("El Gran Varon," "Oh Que Sera"), which makes the album better for those indeed looking for a glimpse at the whole man, not just one of his sides. © Marisa Brown /TiVo
CD$8.99

Latin America - Released January 1, 1978 | Fania

The high point of Willie Colón's ongoing collaboration with Rubén Blades (and close to a career peak for both artists), Siembra exploded on the salsa scene in 1978 and has never been forgotten by fans. Beginning with a minute of playfully deceptive quasi-disco arrangements, Colón and his band slip into a devastating salsa groove for the opener, "Plástico," on which Blades first criticizes America's throwaway society and then brings all of Latin America together with a call to unity. Blades wrote all but one of the songs on Siembra, and shines on all of them; his extended high-tenor salsa scatting lifts "Buscando Guayaba," his tender side comes across on the love song "Dime," and he outlines a devastating life-in-el-Barrio exposé with "Pedro Navaja" (Peter the Knife). For the latter, Colón and Luis Ortiz's tight arrangement adds immeasurably to the song, using street noise and sirens, breaking into an ironic "I like to live in America!," and punching the statement home with a four-trombone line. Reflecting the tough times but optimistic attitude of el Barrio during the late '70s, Siembra joined Cosa Nuestra as one of Willie Colón's career landmarks. © John Bush /TiVo
CD$9.99

Salsa - Released June 7, 2010 | Sony Music Latin

CD$14.99

Latin America - Released April 20, 2012 | Fania

First the good news: this 27-track, two-disc Anthology attributed to Willie Colón features virtually all of his biggest singles recorded in the 1970s, and some cut during the '80s in his solo "symphonic salsa" period. It features his landmark collaborations with Héctor Lavoe, Rubén Blades, Ismael Miranda, and Celia Cruz. Secondly, it sounds terrific and provides a very solid overview of Colón's career at Fania Records. But this is also where certain problems arise. Another two-disc anthology, called The Player and containing 28 cuts, was released by the label in 2007; it featured a vast majority of these same tracks -- a little over a handful were substituted, and arguably, the replacement cuts on the earlier compilation were stronger. It also contained much more detailed liner notes, photographs, and discographical information. For those who already purchased The Player, purchasing Anthology would be largely superfluous. For those merely seeking an introduction to Colón, this is an excellent entry point that reveals his vast influence and massive contribution to salsa and Latin popular music. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
CD$12.99

Latin America - Released June 8, 2010 | Fania

The high point of Willie Colón's ongoing collaboration with Rubén Blades (and close to a career peak for both artists), Siembra exploded on the salsa scene in 1978 and has never been forgotten by fans. Beginning with a minute of playfully deceptive quasi-disco arrangements, Colón and his band slip into a devastating salsa groove for the opener, "Plástico," on which Blades first criticizes America's throwaway society and then brings all of Latin America together with a call to unity. Blades wrote all but one of the songs on Siembra, and shines on all of them; his extended high-tenor salsa scatting lifts "Buscando Guayaba," his tender side comes across on the love song "Dime," and he outlines a devastating life-in-el-Barrio exposé with "Pedro Navaja" (Peter the Knife). For the latter, Colón and Luis Ortiz's tight arrangement adds immeasurably to the song, using street noise and sirens, breaking into an ironic "I like to live in America!," and punching the statement home with a four-trombone line. Reflecting the tough times but optimistic attitude of el Barrio during the late '70s, Siembra joined Cosa Nuestra as one of Willie Colón's career landmarks. © John Bush /TiVo
CD$10.49

Latin America - Released December 31, 1973 | Fania

CD$14.99

Latin America - Released January 1, 2008 | Fania

CD$10.49

Latin America - Released January 1, 1983 | Fania

Colon, one of the most creative heads of the '60s, has retained the same restlessness and inquiring mind, and the same ability to come up with music both beguiling and intelligent. (Check out the use of the female coro in "Volo" on this album.) With fine vocals and fine musicians, who would dare claim to spot all the stylistic sideglances under the surface of this subtle and enchanting album? © John Storm Roberts /TiVo
CD$12.99

Latin America - Released January 1, 2006 | Fania

From the birth of El Malo all the way up to The Last Fight, Willie Colón was the most famed man in Latin music, a musical gangster who may not have spent real time in jail, but played up the criminal image to maximum effect on his record sleeves. (Ironically, the only time he fell afoul of the law was when he released Gran Fuga (The Big Break), an album that drew federal complaints for sporting a "Wanted by the FBI" cover.) Of course, his fame never rested entirely on his image, not when Colón records of the late '60s and early '70s boasted the best charts, the best trombone playing, the best chorus of soneros, and the best musicians in salsa arranged behind him. OG: Original Gangster includes a baker's dozen of tracks from 1967 to 1984, the cream of the crop according to any Colón fan. All of the best inclusions from his greatest LPs are here -- "Eso Se Baila Asi" from The Hustler, "Che Che Colé" and "Juana Peña" from Cosa Nuestra, "MC2 (Theme Realides)" from The Good, The Bad, The Ugly, and "Pedro Navaja" from Siembra. © John Bush /TiVo
CD$10.49

Latin America - Released January 1, 1971 | Fania

Already one of the most feared young talents on the salsa scene, Willie Colón and his partner in crime Héctor Lavoe showcased not only confidence but a surprising flexibility and independence on 1970s La Gran Fuga (The Big Break). Case in point was the first song, "Ghana'e," based on an African children's song and given a vocal reading (by both Lavoe and the band chorus) that invoked a sense of joy and wonder quite at odds with the cutthroat world of New York salsa. Throughout the album, Colón's septet was tight as usual (they had freed themselves completely from their Latin soul and novelty past) but they performed songs at many different paces and left plenty of space in their sound -- yet still never sacrificed the power of Colón and Willie Campbell's dual-trombone lineup. The son montuno "Pa' Colombia" or the powerful "Barrunto" were the clearest hits to those who were already Colón fans, but the rest of the material stretched Colón's résumé, including the melancholy "No Cambiaré," an affectionate look at the power of grandmothers (and mothers) in "Abuelita," and salutes to Puerto Rico, Colombia, Brazil, and Mexico as well as the Estados Unidos. © John Bush /TiVo
CD$10.49

Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 1970 | Fania

A groundbreaking early-'70s recording, Asalto Navideño was a Christmas album, and Christmas is the time when the old jibaro mountain sound comes briefly into its own. Colon hired cuatro player Yomo Toro and gave him a leading role, launching him on a new career. A major album, it includes one of Colon's finest Panamanian-flavored early hits, "La Murga." © John Storm Roberts /TiVo
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

World - Released April 24, 2020 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res
CD$10.49

World - Released January 1, 1967 | Fania

CD$11.49

Latin America - Released January 1, 1972 | Fania

A short yet well-chosen anthology of Willie Colón's early recordings, Crime Pays includes each of his biggest hits -- "Che Che Colé," "Guisando," "El Malo," "Juana Peña," "Jazzy" -- from the late '60s and early '70s. Though the Colón/Lavoe gangster-style cover earns bonus points for style, most fans of Willie Colón will want all of the LPs these tracks were compiled from. © John Bush /TiVo
CD$8.99

Latin America - Released January 1, 1969 | Fania

His third album has, for trivia buffs, his second-favorite cover. Colon was 20 at the time, and this is still the funky, riotous, sometimes mildly ragged and chaotic sound of his early days. The hallmarks are exuberance, humor, innovation, lots of Colon compositions and, as a bonus, the fine piano of the band's African-American pianist, Mark Diamond. © John Storm Roberts /TiVo
CD$12.99

Latin America - Released December 31, 1977 | Fania

CD$10.49

Latin America - Released December 31, 1987 | Fania

Cruz with Willie is just about as sure a thing as Celia with Johnny (Pacheco). Surer, maybe, since C&J have made far more recordings than C&W. Celia Cruz is the nearest thing to an icon in contemporary salsa, and since she reaches at least two generations, you can bet on this reaching at least the Top Three, if not the zenith. © John Storm Roberts, Original Music /TiVo
CD$12.99

World - Released December 31, 1981 | Fania

A Celia Cruz/Willie Colon collaboration is to salseros what a Marvin Gaye/Tammi Terrell duet is to soul lovers or an Ella Fitzgerald/Louis Armstrong project is to jazz enthusiasts; in other words, you're bringing together two of the best artists that the genre has to offer. When Cruz and Colon get together, the sparks usually fly -- and Celia y Willie is no exception. Considering how much this LP had going for it, one would have been surprised if things hadn't gone well. Celia y Willie is an album that boasts Cruz on lead vocals, Colon producing, salsa impresario Jerri Masucci serving as executive producer, and talent like Luis "Perico" Ortiz and Louie Ramirez helping with the arrangements, not to mention Cruz having access to excellent material. Add those things up, and it would have been surprising if Cruz hadn't soared on exuberant gems like "Kirimbambara," "Latinos en Estados Unidos," and the hit "Don Jueyes." Equally strong is "Come Down to Miami," which has an English title but offers mostly Spanish lyrics. Praising Miami, the song playfully urges New York's Latinos to say good-bye to the Big Apple's chilly winters and make Miami their permanent home. And even if you're quite happy living in New York and don't care for Miami's year-round heat, "Come Down to Miami" is still fun and infectious. A fine example of the chemistry that Cruz and Colon enjoy, Willie y Celia is happily recommended to salseros. © Alex Henderson /TiVo