Similar artists

Albums

$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 17, 2003 | 2062

"It’s an album split into tracks, although it’s almost impossible to regard it as such, especially as it’s easy to pin a narrative on it when tiny pin-pricks of light rip through the surface in its backend."
$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 2, 2014 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

A work of minimal, process-based tape music, experimental composer William Basinski's Disintegration Loops series achieves astonishingly moving and evocative states through relatively simplistic means. In the process of transferring aging reel-to-reel tape loops to a digital medium, Basinski found the reels (originally recorded in 1982) were so old and decrepit that the tape would shed slightly with each pass of the loop. This gradually affected the sound coming through, blurring the short, pastoral phrases of sound into an increasingly ghostly and unintelligible ambient landscape. Basinski discovered this process in the final months of the summer of 2001 and was listening back to the loops on the rooftop of his Brooklyn apartment on the fateful morning of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, adding a haunting subtext to the entire project. The first volume of four finds a glowing fragment of tubas and chamber percussion slowly fading into a submerged glow over the course of its hourlong deterioration. ~ Fred Thomas
$13.49
$8.99

Ambient - Released March 8, 2019 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

Hi-Res
"The ambient composer turns his attention to the skies, sourcing an epic, heart-stirring sound from gravitational waves emanated by two massive black holes that collided 1.3 billion years ago."
$13.49
$8.99

Electronic/Dance - Released January 20, 2017 | 2062

Hi-Res
Composer William Basinski's 2017 album A Shadow in Time contains two pieces, one of which ("For David Robert Jones") was commissioned by Los Angeles gallery Volume shortly after the early-2016 death of David Bowie. As with The Disintegration Loops, the 9/11 elegy for which Basinski is best known, the piece was created using decrepit tape loops that seem to call out like voices or melodies from the dead. Here, the main loop sounds like it could've been a fragment of some sort of cheery recording from the early 20th century, but here it's been faded and distorted beyond recognition into something ghastly and haunting. After six minutes, it's joined by a garbled, mangled loop of Basinski's tenor saxophone playing. The two loops are suspended in a damp, cloudy ether with the help of ominous droning played on a Voyetra 8, an extremely rare and complex polyphonic synthesizer. The piece is directly inspired by "Subterraneans," the elegiac closing number from Bowie's landmark 1977 album Low, but Basinski's feels much more ghostly and removed from reality. The sounds continue to loop and flow, and while it feels like there are changes gradually being made, it's hard to tell what's being added, removed, or altered. It seems like it's sinking deeper and deeper, but at the same time it doesn't feel like it's moving an inch. There is certainly a subtle bass pulse that emerges during the second half, gradually getting louder before the loops end up withering away into nothing. "A Shadow in Time" seems more focused on the Voyetra than on tape loops, beginning with soft, feedback-like tones and gradually seeping into a more enveloping drone. The piece seems like it needs to be experienced in a huge, spacious setting in order to fully grasp everything occurring in its dense, detailed web of sound. At times, crashing or sweeping sounds are heard, and it seems like melodies are beginning to emerge, but it's never obvious. On the vinyl version, the piece ends after 17 minutes, but on the CD, it concludes with a coda of a sparse, fragile piano loop. As ever, Basinski is a master at suspending time, and the album seems to flow by faster than the clock indicates. When it does end, you wonder if you've been taken somewhere, or if you've been changed in some way. The only key to answering these questions is to dive back in. ~ Paul Simpson
$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 3, 2007 | 2062

$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 2, 2014 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 19, 2009 | 2062

$20.24
$13.49

Ambient - Released February 8, 2019 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

Hi-Res
$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 17, 2003 | 2062

$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 2, 2014 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

Experimental composer William Basinski's Disintegration Loops series is an astonishing work of minimal, process-based tape music, achieving moving and evocative states through relatively simplistic means. In the process of transferring aging reel-to-reel tape loops to a digital medium, Basinski found the reels (originally recorded in 1982) were so old and decrepit that the tape would shed slightly with each pass of the loop. This gradually affected the sound coming through, blurring the short, pastoral phrase of sound into an increasingly ghostly and unintelligible ambient landscape. Basinski discovered this process in the final months of the summer of 2001 and was listening back to the loops on the rooftop of his Brooklyn apartment on the fateful morning of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, adding a haunting subtext to the entire project. The second volume of the series finds a darker passage of menacing, indistinguishable music slowly crumbling into a dark ambient wash, with only stuttering pieces audible by the end of the recording. ~ Fred Thomas
$9.99

Electronic/Dance - Released February 5, 2008 | Line

$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 15, 2003 | 2062

$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 15, 2001 | 2062

$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released April 28, 2015 | 2062

"[I]t has endless variation at the micro level, which creates the sense of a paradox -- repetition that is impossible to grasp, slipping ceaselessly through your fingers."
$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 2, 2014 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

William Basinski probably did not intend to make a requiem for New York City on September 11, 2001, but in a monumental coincidence, he has. On that morning, Basinski was transferring some analog tape loops that he had created in the 1980s into a digital format. What he found while playing the tapes is that because of their age and the instability of magnetic tape over long periods of time, the tape itself was literally disintegrating. Each time he would play the loop, bits of iron oxide would fall from the tape and the music on it would sound more fragmented during the next repetition. "dlp4" is the more compelling of the two: a simple piano and string melody is mangled by the forces of time and entropy, decaying by the end of a short 20 minutes into fragments of sound emerging only to be suddenly cut short and replaced by complete silence. It is the true sound of deconstruction, the slow but relentless death of beauty over time. "dlp5," clocking in at 52 minutes, is a much simpler orchestral melody than "dlp4," and decomposes in a subtler manner. The music becomes more and more muddy as it loops, with less overt damage to the tape. Remarkably, the piece retains its structure until the very end of the piece, where the melody truly begins to fracture and become consumed by silence. While structurally similar to the rest of the Disintegration Loops series, this volume is more accessible than the others. ~ James Mason
$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released July 19, 2006 | 2062

Over the past several years, William Basinski has released on his 2062 imprint several archived releases of his work with tape loops and piano from the '70s and '80s. Variations for Piano and Tape is no exception. Much of the 45-minute piece relies heavily on trademark Basinski elements: a melancholic melody played on a piano with a sense of fragility and romantic sentimentality, repeated over and over at a slow tempo. However, what sets this piece apart from its contemporaries is the method in which the tape provides such a haunting counterpoint. Like his Disintegration Loops series, the tape machine acts as an agent slowly modifying and eroding the original piece, this time providing a reverse piano (thanks to the other side of the tape wearing through) as a counterpoint melody. For fans of Basinski's work, there is nothing here out of the ordinary that will provoke or irritate -- nothing to shock, and he really doesn't make any bold departures sonically with this piece. However, it is definitely one of the most relaxed, soothing pieces in his entire catalog, and it is one of the more accessible pieces as well. ~ Rob Theakston
$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released April 28, 2015 | 2062

Rock - Released November 13, 2015 | 2062

Download not available

Rock - Released November 13, 2015 | 2062

Download not available
$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released December 3, 2009 | 2062