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Rock - Released December 1, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Best New Reissue
After a magical first work of fairly rough alternative country (A.M.) that was conceived at the time of the turbulent separation of his group Uncle Tupelo, Jeff Tweedy took his time to release a second album with Wilco. Already, the work was ambitious as it was a double album. Blending all their musical similarities, this was an album that from the moment it was released in October 1996 led quite a few journalists to write that Tweedy had signed his own Exile On Main Street. Much like the Rolling Stones’ masterpiece, eclecticism is the crucial ingredient to this mix of basic rock’n’roll, bluegrass, country rock, psychedelia, folk and soul. With loose guitars, pedal steel, brass and unlimited instrumentals, Wilco weaves here an impressive web between the Rolling Stones from their golden age, The Replacements, The Beatles and Big Star from the album Third. Alternating between ballads and electronic soundstorms, Tweedy demonstrates above all else that with a timeless and classical base, he is taking the lead with his grandiose songs and the stunning architecture of his compositions… This remastered Deluxe Edition offers, as well as the original album, fifteen unpublished bonus tracks notably including alternative versions of I Got You and Say You Miss Me alongside a live recording from 12th November 1996 in Troubadour, Los Angeles and a session for the radio station Santa Monica KCRW taken the next day. © MZ/Qobuz
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Rock - Released April 16, 2002 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released March 8, 1999 | Nonesuch

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Jeff Tweedy once blazed the trail for the American rock underground's embrace of its country and folk roots, but as the decade drew to a close he also began spearheading the return of classic pop; simply put, what once were fiddles on Wilco records became violins -- the same instrument, to be sure, but viewed with a radical shift in perception and meaning. While lacking the sheer breadth and ambition of the previous Being There, Summer Teeth is the most focused Wilco effort yet, honing the lessons of the last record to forge a majestic pop sound almost completely devoid of alt-country elements. The lush string arrangements and gorgeous harmonies of tracks like "She's a Jar" and "Pieholden Suite" suggest nothing less than a landlocked Brian Wilson, while more straightforward rockers like the opening "I Can't Stand It" bear the influence of everything from R&B to psychedelia. Still, for all of the superficial warmth and beauty of the record's arrangements, Tweedy's songs are perhaps his darkest and most haunting to date, bleak domestic dramas informed by recurring themes of alienation, adultery, and abuse -- even the sunniest melodies mask moments of devastating power. If Summer Teeth has a precedent, it's peak-era Band; the album not only possesses a similar pastoral sensibility, but like Robbie Robertson and company before them, Wilco seems directly connected to a kind of American musical consciousness, not only rejuvenating our collective creative mythology, but adding new chapters to the legend with each successive record. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 16, 2013 | Nonesuch

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Rock - Released April 16, 2002 | Nonesuch

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Few bands can call themselves contemporaries of both the heartbreakingly earnest self-destruction of Whiskeytown and the alienating experimentation of Radiohead's post-millennial releases, but on the painstaking Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, Wilco seem to have done just that. In early 2001, the Chicago-area band focused on recording their fourth album, which ultimately led to the departure of guitarist Jay Bennett and tensions with their record label. Unwilling to change the album to make it more commercially viable, the band bought the finished studio tapes from Warner/Reprise for 50,000 dollars and left the label altogether. The turmoil surrounding the recording and distribution of the album in no way diminishes the sheer quality of the genre-spanning pop songs written by frontman Jeff Tweedy and his bandmates. After throwing off the limiting shackles of the alt-country tag that they had been saddled with through their 1996 double album Being There, Wilco experimented heavily with the elaborate constructs surrounding their simple melodies on Summerteeth. The long-anticipated Yankee Hotel Foxtrot continues their genre-jumping and worthwhile experimentation. The sprawling, nonsensical "I Am Trying to Break Your Heart" is as charmingly bleak as anything Tweedy has written to date, while the positively joyous "Heavy Metal Drummer" jangles through bright choruses and summery reminiscences. Similarly, "Kamera" dispels the opening track's gray with a warm acoustic guitar and mixer/multi-instrumentalist/"fifth Beatle" Jim O'Rourke's unusual production. The true high points of the album are when the songwriting is at its most introspective, as it is during the heartwrenching "Ashes of American Flags," which takes on an eerie poignancy in the wake of the attacks at the World Trade Center. "All my lies are always wishes," Tweedy sings, "I know I would die if I could come back new." As is the case with many great artists, the evolution of the band can push the music into places that many listeners (and record companies for that matter) may not be comfortable with, but, in the case of Wilco, their growth has steadily led them into more progressive territory. While their songs still maintain the loose intimacy that was apparent on their debut A.M., the music has matured to reveal a complexity that is rare in pop music, yet showcased perfectly on Yankee Hotel Foxtrot. © Zac Johnson /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 4, 2019 | dBpm Records

Pop, country, rock, experimental, folk, a little bit of everything! Since 1994, Wilco have released all kinds of different albums and yet always managed to retain their sense of identity. It’s no wonder that the Chicagoan band led by Jeff Tweedy has built itself an impressive fan base that stays loyal no matter what the musical flavour of the day. Over drinks between indie-rock geeks there may be a ‘Wilco moment’ when the band’s hard-core aficionados have it out with their fiercest critics, but there is disputing the fact that the band has its own sense of style; a combination of nostalgia, sadness, humour and a passion for the history of rock ‘n’ roll and folk music, like a quirky version of classic rock. Ode to joy is the band’s first album since Schmilco (2016), as well as Tweedy’s solo escapade (Warm in 2018) and the release of his fascinating memoir (Let’s Go (So We Can Get Back)). He has heavily influenced the album which, at certain points, brings to mind to the personal approach of Sky Blue Sky that readers of Tweedy’s book would be able to understand on a deeper level. The album is mainly acoustic with a classical rhythm sung in the style of a confession and gives the fans exactly what they want, without straying too far off the beaten track. The hypnotic Quiet Amplifier is 100% Wilco and Nels Cline adds his own personal touch as noise guitarist on We Were Lucky, reminding us that he is still the experimental guru. As for the melodies, (especially the fantastic One and a Half Stars), Ode to Joy easily surpasses their two previous albums, Star Wars and Schmilco. Even in their fifties with a 25-year career under their belts, the group dispels any age-related doubts you may have had and are still very much on the ball. A good vintage that could well become a great vintage over time. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released July 16, 2013 | Nonesuch

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Rock - Released March 8, 1999 | Nonesuch

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Rock - Released June 21, 2004 | Nonesuch

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Rock - Released July 16, 2013 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 9, 2016 | Anti - Epitaph

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Rock - Released July 16, 2013 | Nonesuch

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Rock - Released November 17, 2014 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 27, 2011 | Anti - Epitaph

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Rock - Released November 17, 2014 | Nonesuch

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Rock - Released December 1, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Records

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At the beginning of the ‘80s, Green On Red (a group that emerged out of the Paisley Underground scene) rehabilitated the most rebellious country music. A few years later, other American indie rock groups enjoyed reviving the flame of this plague-stricken genre. Filtered over time and with a lo-fi aesthetic, this alternative country mixes the heritage of Gram Parsons with the Flying Burrito Brothers, Neil Young, the Byrds from their Sweetheart Of The Rodeo period and the Rolling Stones from Exile On Main Street. Led by Jay Farrar and Jeff Tweedy, Uncle Tupelo affirm themselves as one of the most gifted representatives of the genre. But the duo split, with Farrar leaving to found Son Volt and Tweedy heading off down the Wilco path. With A.M., the first shining album from his new combo which appeared in 1995, the songwriter from Illinois confirmed his talent in the art of fusing all his roots influences from the past by giving them a sound that’s considerably rougher and more contemporary. Above all, Jeff Tweedy writes with a pen made of hardened steel. It follows that compositions such as I Must Be High, Casino Queen, Box Full Of Letters and Passenger Side are quick to forget their heavy influences (Stones, Parsons, Young…) and underline the talent of the gentleman. As well as the original album, this remastered Deluxe Edition offers eight bonus unpublished tracks such as first versions of Outtasite (Outta Mind) and When You Find Trouble, in fact being the last studio recording for Uncle Tupelo. © MZ/Qobuz
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Rock - Released June 21, 2004 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 17, 2015 | Anti - Epitaph

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Rock - Released November 14, 2005 | Nonesuch - Warner Records

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Rock - Released March 1, 2009 | Nonesuch

In 1999, Wilco willingly abdicated their position as one of the leading acts in the alt-country movement to dive head-first into the challenging waters of experimental pop with their album Summerteeth, and moved even further away from their rootsy origins with Yankee Hotel Foxtrot and A Ghost Is Born, winning the group a new and enthusiastic audience along the way. So it might amuse a number of the band's earlier fans that in many respects Wilco's sixth studio album, Sky Blue Sky, sounds like the long-awaited follow-up to 1996's Being There -- while it lacks the ramshackle shape-shifting and broad twang of that earlier album, Sky Blue Sky represents a shift back to an organic sound and approach that suggests the influence of Neil Young's Harvest and the more polished avenues of '70s soft rock. Sky Blue Sky also marks Wilco's first studio recordings since Nels Cline and Pat Sansone joined the group, and they certainly make their presence felt -- with Cline, Wilco has its strongest guitarist to date, and while his interplay with Sansone on numbers like "Impossible Germany" and "Walken" lacks the skronky muscle of his more avant-garde work of the past, it's never less than inspired and he works real wonders with Jeff Tweedy's lovely melodies. Sansone's keyboard work also shines, adding soulful accents to "Side with the Seeds" and Mellotron on "Leave Me (Like You Found Me)," as does Mikael Jorgensen's piano and organ, and overall this is Wilco's strongest album as an ensemble to date. Tweedy's vocals boast a clarity and nuance that reveals he's grown in confidence and skill as a singer, and the songs recall Summerteeth's beautiful but unsettling mix of lovely tunes and lyrics that focus on troubled souls and crumbling relationships. Between the pensive "Be Patient with Me," the lovelorn "Hate It Here," and "On and On and On"'s pledge that "we'll stay together" squared off against the resignation of "Please don't cry/We're designed to die," Sky Blue Sky isn't afraid to go to the dark places, but Tweedy and his bandmates also find plenty of beauty, inspiration, and real joy along the way, and the album's open, natural sound is an ideal match for the material. Sky Blue Sky may find Wilco dipping their toes into roots rock again, but this doesn't feel like a step back so much as another fresh path for one of America's most consistently interesting bands. © Mark Deming /TiVo

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