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R&B - Released March 14, 2014 | Arista - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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R&B/Soul - Released April 29, 1985 | Arista

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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R&B/Soul - Released January 15, 2010 | Arista - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Soundtracks - Released November 17, 1992 | Arista

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R&B - Released November 17, 2017 | Arista - Legacy

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I Wish You Love: More from The Bodyguard is a compilation album assembling various recordings from American singer Whitney Houston. In celebration of the 25th anniversary of the movie The Bodyguard, the collection features previously unheard, live, and alternate versions of the soundtrack material the singer provided. ~ Rob Wacey
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R&B/Soul - Released November 16, 1998 | Arista

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R&B/Soul - Released October 30, 2007 | Arista

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R&B - Released November 7, 2014 | Arista - Legacy

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Pop - Released August 31, 2009 | Arista

Hi-Res Booklet
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R&B/Soul - Released September 26, 1990 | Arista - Legacy

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While Houston's voice always provides some interesting listening, this is somewhat of a disappointing release, with very few memorable songs. While she attempts to make a larger foray into dance music, she fails to make the crossover impact of artists such as Mariah Carey and Taylor Dayne. The two high points she does reach on this album come in the form of ballads -- the uplifting tale of another's love being enough to provide happiness in "All the Man That I Need" and the powerful verses surrounding a love lost through one's own devices in "Miracle." ~ Ashley S. Battel
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R&B/Soul - Released October 30, 2007 | Arista

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R&B/Soul - Released November 25, 1996 | Arista

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Pop - Released December 30, 1998 | Arista

The four-year wait between 2002's Just Whitney and her previous album, 1998's My Love Is Your Love, was half that between that record and its predecessor, 1990's I'm Your Baby Tonight, but it felt twice the length, since Whitney Houston's career nose-dived during those four years. She retreated from the spotlight and as she cancelled concerts, scrapped albums, and pulled out of public appearances, rumors swirled that she and husband Bobby Brown were dangerously addicted to drugs. Following a disastrous performance at the September 2001 Michael Jackson tribute concert, where she looked as if she had already wasted away, the chattering reached a fever pitch and she needed to restore her reputation -- hence the title of Just Whitney, an assertion that she's returning to her basics. But that's not the half of it. As her trainwreck interview with Diane Sawyer on PrimeTime Live the week prior to Just Whitney's release proved, she's arrogantly defensive about her "bad habits" and is "Unashamed" of "the life that [she] leads," as she sings on the eighth song on this odd, disarmingly brief (under 40 minutes) self-styled comeback album. Just listen to the first single, the roundly ignored "Whatchulookinat" (produced by husband Brown, who Whitney thanks for being the best producer in the world, although he only helmed this track on the album), where she plays the victim, claiming that the gossip-mongers "messing with my reputation/ain't you got no education...don't even have a clue about what I'm facin'," coming across as if she had something to hide. It's a sentiment that runs throughout the album -- phrases like "you don't know what I'm goin' through" and "you criticize my actions/even though you don't stand in my shoes" pop up regularly -- and undermines an album that's otherwise a not-bad set of contemporary soul. Certainly, Whitney is in better voice than rival diva Mariah Carey (whose near simultaneously released Charmbracelet found her voice in tatters) and she's fortunate enough to have Babyface for four productions, three of which are among the highlights of the album. Though Missy Elliott produces a track here, this is nowhere near as concerned with hip production as My Love was and who can blame her? When a career is on the rocks, it's best to play it safe. And that's what Just Whitney is: a measured attempt to salvage a career that's on the verge of destruction. Does it work? Well, musically, it's not bad, though few songs are memorable. It would be a good standard-issue Whitney album if it wasn't for her disarming, defensive attempt to defuse every rumor hurled in her direction. Even an otherwise innocuous duet with Brown is presented like it's the two of them against the world, nearly celebrating the fact that Bobby's voice is very strained these days. Worst of all, there seems to be nobody to check Whitney and prevent her from indulging in bad ideas. After all, surely somebody in the Houston camp should have realized that at this crucial time in her career, as she admits drug "habits," that covering "You Light Up My Life" might not be the smartest move to make right now. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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R&B/Soul - Released February 9, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

Exhale (Shoop Shoop) was the first single released from the Babyface-penned soundtrack to the hit film Waiting to Exhale, which starred Whitney Houston. The maxi-single included five tracks (but no remixes), making it into something of a Houston rarities CD (as was the case with its follow-up single, Count on Me). "Exhale" spent a lone week atop the U.S. pop charts, and stands as one of Houston's most understated hits. The song, with its quiet bells, lovely strings, and mellow arrangement, sounds almost like a soulful Christmas carol, which was fitting as the song was a hit during 1995's Christmas season. Two hard to find former B-sides are on this single: "Dancing' on the Smooth Edge" and the gorgeous "Moment of Truth," which became something of a radio hit years earlier. Also included is Houston's contribution to 1987's much-loved original A Very Special Christmas album, "Do You Hear What I Hear," which has gone on to become a modern-day holiday favorite. To round out the single is Houston's campy and somewhat bizarre duet with Aretha Franklin, "It Isn't, It Wasn't, It Ain't Never Gonna Be." That song, which peaked at an embarrassing number 41, was originally on Franklin's 1989 album, Through the Storm, and finds the two R&B queens pitted against each other over the same guy, all the while referring to one another as "Miss Thang." Therefore, this maxi-single was a cleverly compiled bag of Houston rarities (good and bad), and an irresistible enticement for the singer's many fans. ~ Jose F. Promis
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R&B/Soul - Released August 28, 2009 | Arista

It's only been seven years between Just Whitney and 2009's I Look to You, not even Houston's longest time between albums, but it feels much, much longer, her glory days obscured in hazy memories of lost luster chiefly deriving from a bad marriage with Bobby Brown, chronicled in an embarrassing reality show for Bravo in 2004. I Look to You attempts to wash this all away with something of a return to roots -- a celebration of Houston's deep disco beginnings, tempered with a few skyscraping ballads designed to showcase her soaring voice. Houston's rocky decade isn't ignored, but it isn't explored, either: songs allude to Whitney's strength, her willpower as a survivor struggling through some unnamed struggle -- enough for listeners to fill in the blanks, either with their own experience or their imaginings of Houston's life. More than the songs, Whitney's voice tells the tale of her lost decade. The highs are diminished, the sweetness sanded away, leaving her a thick, knotty powerful growl that has an emotional pull not quite like a ravaged latter-day Billie Holiday, but not all that far removed, either; at the very least, Whitney can still sing, knowing when to wring emotion out of a phrase, knowing when not to push for the glory notes that she can no longer hit. This diminished skill set actually serves the showboating showstoppers well, turning them into something that operates on a human scale, injecting them with something approximating warmth, something that the songs quite deliberately avoid. Also, there just aren't that many of them on I Look to You, either. Most of the album splits the difference between burnished neo-disco and modern soul, aware of fashion but not pandering to them. Which isn't to say that these songs are necessarily age-appropriate, either: they're suspended in time and fashion, tinged with nostalgia but not quite taking into account that Houston isn't now (and never really was) a creature of the clubs. What she undoubtedly is, is a pro -- she sells these subdued glitzy productions, she makes boring songs interesting, she remains a forceful, tangible presence. With this admirable, if not quite successful, un-comeback out of the way, maybe she can pull away from the spotlight and settle into the serious business of finding songs to suit her new voice. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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R&B/Soul - Released September 26, 2001 | Arista

Houston displays her fabulous vocal talents on this version of the national anthem of the United States performed during the opening ceremonies of the 1991 NFL Super Bowl. ~ Ashley S. Battel
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R&B/Soul - Released June 6, 2006 | Arista

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R&B/Soul - Released November 6, 2009 | Arista

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R&B/Soul - Released June 6, 2006 | Arista

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R&B - Released November 6, 2017 | Arista - Legacy