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Alternative & Indie - Released February 1, 2019 | [PIAS]

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Reuniting with producer Ed Buller, who helmed their first and third albums, White Lies recapture the urgency and anthemic hooks of their early sound and add a sophistication that feels right for a band a decade into their career on 2019's Five. In many ways the album isn't that different from the London trio's previous work. Still showcased is lead singer and instrumentalist Harry McVeigh's brooding baritone, along with bassist Charles Cave and drummer Jack Lawrence-Brown. Together, they offer up a moody, often propulsive set that draws upon various touchstones, from driving Joy Division-style post-punk ("Never Alone") and synthy new wave romanticism ("Time to Give") to Boy-era U2 kineticism ("Jo?")." That said, there's more guitar here, including gargantuan slabs of bass and deft laser jab riffage. They even dabble in some echoey Pink Floyd-style space twang on "Kick Me." Equally compelling is the glammy "Denial," which matches a memorable chorus hook with lyrics that evoke the ennui of having reached your thirties and settled into a kind of domestic mundanity. McVeigh sings "Four kids and a cat, might as well be called five." Elsewhere, the band achieve even more dichotomous emotional uplift, tackling themes of loneliness and urban disconnection on "Tokyo," which taps into a dusky Giorgio Moroder-esque club groove before smashing through the glass of your emotions with a big pop chorus. Similarly, "Believe It," with its pounding bass and glassy synth accents, finds the band wrestling with "the fear" and notions of therapeutic release. While there's not any major conceptual through-line here, one of the most impressive aspects of Five is the album's balanced flow, which evokes the A- and B-side aesthetic of the vinyl age. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2008 | Polydor Records

To Lose My Life... is the debut album from West London post-punk outfit White Lies, who have been compared to Joy Division and Arcade Fire. Received positively and slated as a contender for the Mercury Music Prize, the album was produced by Ed Buller and Max Dingel, who have previously worked with the Killers and Glasvegas. The album includes the singles "Unfinished Business," "Death," "To Lose My Life," and "From the Stars." © TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Polydor Records

White Lies' third studio album, 2013's Big TV, finds the band building upon the darkly anthemic sound of their first two albums with an added songwriting maturity. After touring almost non-stop in support of 2009's To Lose My Life and 2011's Ritual, White Lies took almost a two-year break to recoup and rethink their direction before heading back into the studio to record Big TV. The time off seems to have worked, as the trio of lead singer/guitarist Harry McVeigh, bassist Charles Cave, and drummer Jack Brown, along with producer Ed Buller -- who also co-produced the band’s debut -- have crafted a handful of highly literate, single-worthy tracks that still evince their love of moody, '80s post-punk. Admittedly, the album sprawls to some degree; there are two instrumental interludes. It's as if, after taking a break, White Lies felt compelled to try and get all of their pent-up ideas out onto the table. Thankfully, many of their ideas work. In many ways, Big TV has all of the characteristics White Lies fans have come to expect from them including driving post-punk beats, evocative guitar lines, chilly synth parts, and McVeigh's prophetic baritone croon. Impossibly, they sound even more engaged and clear-eyed than on the ambitious, stylized Ritual. With that album, White Lies seemed to put a song's overall production sound ahead of the song. The opposite is true with Big TV, and songs like the title track and the poignant ballad "Change" are deeply moving, emotionally resonant songs that still retain all of White Lies' penchant for arid, '70s sci-fi movie-inspired atmosphere. Also engaging are several euphoria-inducing tracks like sparkling lead single "There Goes Our Love Again" and the sweepingly romantic, orchestral synthesizer-tinged "First Time Caller." Elsewhere, White Lies dive headlong into the deep sea electro-disco of the Giorgio Moroder-inspired "Get Even," and lift our hearts cloud-ward with the pulsing Echo and the Bunnymen-esque dance-rocker "Be Your Man." Ultimately, with Big TV, White Lies combine the urgent passions of their debut with the conceptual ambitions of their sophomore effort for an engaging, far-reaching epic. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 10, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Since their debut, 2009's impressive To Lose My Life..., Britain's White Lies have stayed remarkably true to their crisply delivered brand of brooding, emotive post-punk. Centered on the yearning croon of lead singer/guitarist Harry McVeigh, White Lies also feature bassist Charles Cave and drummer Jack Lawrence-Brown. Together, they craft an undeniably attractive sound that matches hooky choruses and poetic lyrics with a moody, bass-heavy sound that owes a large debt to '80s icons like Joy Division and The Teardrop Explodes. Subsequent albums, like 2013's Big TV, found them fleshing out their arrangements with shimmering orchestral synths and electronic flourishes. With their fourth studio album, 2016's Friends, the band continues to hew closely to its gray-scale aesthetics, albeit with a nuanced sophistication and brighter melodic palette that sounds like something you'd encounter on college rock radio in the early '80s. Largely self-produced, Friends sounds a lot like the band's past work, full of propulsive Peter Hook-influenced basslines, edgy, kinetic electric guitars, driving beats, and synthesizers that frame McVeigh's burnished baritone hue in a halo of neon sparkle. Cuts like "Take It Out on Me," "Morning in LA," and the Richard Wilkinson-produced "Come On" are soaring anthems that balance gothy gravitas with an uplifting, romantic pop euphoria. Similarly, tracks like "Hold Back Your Love" and "Is My Love Enough?" bring to mind something along the lines of a Scott Walker album as produced by Giorgio Moroder. Ultimately, Friends is a focused, clear-eyed album that finds White Lies trading some of the sprawling ambition of Big TV for the infectious pop urgency of their debut. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 19, 2009 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

To Lose My Life... is the debut album from West London post-punk outfit White Lies, who have been compared to Joy Division and Arcade Fire. Received positively and slated as a contender for the Mercury Music Prize, the album was produced by Ed Buller and Max Dingel, who have previously worked with the Killers and Glasvegas. The album includes the singles "Unfinished Business," "Death," "To Lose My Life," and "From the Stars." © TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 17, 2018 | [PIAS]

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 8, 2019 | [PIAS]

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 7, 2016 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2010 | Polydor Records

On their second album, Ritual, White Lies explore the darker, more ethereal side of the post-punk revival. Murky and brooding, the album finds the bandmembers developing as songwriters and being rewarded with a deeper sound for their troubles. Stepping out of the shadow of the likes of Interpol and Editors, Ritual captures a sound that’s both ethereal and tense, setting the listener adrift in an ominous sea of synthesizers and brooding vocals. A welcome surprise in all of this comes by way of White Lies' ability to break up the gloom with the occasional soaring moment. Songs like “Strangers” and “Holy Ghost” have almost rhapsodic moments, creating little points of light that guide the listener through the melancholic darkness. This blending of tension and triumph comes together splendidly on “Bad Love,” a song that slowly builds, adding layer after layer until finally exploding into a huge chorus that ties the whole song together beautifully with a mix of triumphant vocals and guttural guitars. These moments add a beautifully dynamic element to Ritual and show that in order to really explore the darkness, you need to have light. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 25, 2019 | [PIAS]

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 10, 2019 | [PIAS]

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 6, 2019 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Pop - Released November 30, 2014 | PolyEast Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 12, 2019 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 7, 2019 | [PIAS]

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Polydor Records

White Lies' third studio album, 2013's Big TV, finds the band building upon the darkly anthemic sound of their first two albums with an added songwriting maturity. After touring almost non-stop in support of 2009's To Lose My Life and 2011's Ritual, White Lies took almost a two-year break to recoup and rethink their direction before heading back into the studio to record Big TV. The time off seems to have worked, as the trio of lead singer/guitarist Harry McVeigh, bassist Charles Cave, and drummer Jack Brown, along with producer Ed Buller -- who also co-produced the band’s debut -- have crafted a handful of highly literate, single-worthy tracks that still evince their love of moody, '80s post-punk. Admittedly, the album sprawls to some degree; there are two instrumental interludes. It's as if, after taking a break, White Lies felt compelled to try and get all of their pent-up ideas out onto the table. Thankfully, many of their ideas work. In many ways, Big TV has all of the characteristics White Lies fans have come to expect from them including driving post-punk beats, evocative guitar lines, chilly synth parts, and McVeigh's prophetic baritone croon. Impossibly, they sound even more engaged and clear-eyed than on the ambitious, stylized Ritual. With that album, White Lies seemed to put a song's overall production sound ahead of the song. The opposite is true with Big TV, and songs like the title track and the poignant ballad "Change" are deeply moving, emotionally resonant songs that still retain all of White Lies' penchant for arid, '70s sci-fi movie-inspired atmosphere. Also engaging are several euphoria-inducing tracks like sparkling lead single "There Goes Our Love Again" and the sweepingly romantic, orchestral synthesizer-tinged "First Time Caller." Elsewhere, White Lies dive headlong into the deep sea electro-disco of the Giorgio Moroder-inspired "Get Even," and lift our hearts cloud-ward with the pulsing Echo and the Bunnymen-esque dance-rocker "Be Your Man." Ultimately, with Big TV, White Lies combine the urgent passions of their debut with the conceptual ambitions of their sophomore effort for an engaging, far-reaching epic. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 24, 2018 | [PIAS]

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 5, 2018 | [PIAS]

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 4, 2019 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 29, 2016 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC