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Pop - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Dionne Warwick followed up the lukewarm reception for On Stage and in the Movies (1967) with her ninth long player for Scepter Records in less than four years. Conversely, Windows of the World (1967) would garner a favorable impression thanks in part to "Say a Little Prayer" and the hauntingly poignant and politically-tinged title song, "Windows of the World." Both are timeless illustrations of the pop perfection found in Warwick's interpretations of Burt Bacharach and Hal David classics. The same is true of "(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me," "The Beginning of Loneliness" and the irresistibly groovy "Another Night," all of which were minor hits. The team also provided the secondary (read: filler) "Walk Little Dolly," sporting a gliding waltz arrangement that is custom-fit to Warwick's lilting and expressive vocal. As on earlier collections, she expands beyond the Bacharach/David songbook on a few show tunes, forecasting her impending success on André Previn's "(Theme From) Valley of the Dolls." Another Previn composition, "You're Gonna Hear from Me" -- from Inside Daisy Clover -- is included here in an impressive Peter Matz score. Warwick's deep gospel roots are drawn upon as she unleashes one of the most striking performances of her career. Matz gives West Side Story's "Somewhere" a jazzy and fully orchestrated reading that takes advantage of Warwick's innate timing and commanding pipes -- especially when holding that final "...someway..." that lasts over ten seconds. On the lighter side, O.B. Massingill and Warwick collaborated on the camped up rendition of Nat King Cole and Bert Kaempfert's "Love." © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Pop - Released December 3, 1985 | Rhino

Rhino's The Dionne Warwick Collection: Her All-Time Greatest Hits is the best Warwick collection on the market, culling 24 tracks from her '60s prime. Although it doesn't cover her entire career, it does feature nearly all of her very best material, and it's all in the style that made her famous; top to bottom, it's a stronger, more consistent listen than anything else out there. This was the period when she established herself as the premier interpreter of Burt Bacharach's music, and pulled off the neat trick of appealing to both R&B and easy listening audiences. Warwick was soulful without necessarily singing soul music per se; her smooth, light delivery and polished technique meshed very well with the sophisticated pop of the Bacharach/Hal David team, who co-composed all but one of the songs included here. No other singer navigated Bacharach's deceptively tricky compositions with such effortless grace; the ease she projects on the rhythmically complex "I Say a Little Prayer" and "Promises, Promises" is startling. It's no wonder her versions of Bacharach's songs often became the definitive ones. This compilation doesn't cover Warwick's later hits, like the Spinners' duet "Then Came You," "That's What Friends Are For," or her late-'70s/early-'80s adult contemporary fare; for those, look to Arista's The Definitive Collection, which touches on every phase of her career, or the more specific Greatest Hits (1979-1990). But for a sparkling demonstration of everything that made Warwick great, there's no better buy than The Dionne Warwick Collection. © Steve Huey /TiVo
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R&B - Released July 15, 2016 | Arista - Legacy

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Vocal Jazz - Released October 18, 2019 | S-Curve Records

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Pop - Released February 4, 2004 | Rhino

Dionne Warwick concluded an eight-year run on Scepter Records with 1970's Very Dionne. The album's wide variety of styles summed up much of what made Warwick's back catalog so universally appealing. In addition to a handful of new Burt Bacharach and Hal David sides, the platter boasts tasteful reworkings of pop music staples. As Bacharach and David were ensconced in their own careers -- together and separately -- Warwick, along with her other arrangers, concocted an interesting mix of classic and familiar contemporary tunes, including a live take of "Make It Easy On Yourself," a cut she initially recorded for her first Scepter long-player, 1963's Presenting Dionne Warwick. Although the singer would subsequently state that "Check Out Time" was one of her least favorite Bacharach/David compositions, she opens Very Dionne with an emotive and slightly angst-filled intonation. The mood is immediately contrasted by the pensive and reflective nature of Marty Paich's score on "Yesterday," which Warwick duly matches by way of her generous and soulful interpretation. Larry Wilcox's treatment of the Jimmy Van Heusen standard "Here Comes That Rainy Day" is a perfect example of the vocalist's significant middle-of-the-road allure. This carries over to the decidedly more modern "Going Out of My Head" and "We've Only Just Begun." One unmitigated zenith is "I Got Love" from the Ossie Davis Broadway production Purlie. Once again, Warwick -- under Paich's direction -- equals if not surpasses Melba Moore's stage presentation. In 2004, an expanded edition of Very Dionne increased the running order by 16 selections, highlighted by a ten-song mini-concert held July 23, 1970, at the Garden State Arts Center in Holmdel, NJ, the same show that had yielded "Make It Easy On Yourself" on the original LP. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 19, 2005 | Rhino

Turning the spotlight on various rarities, B-sides, and album cuts, Hidden Gems reminds us that some of Dionne Warwick's best work with the prolific Burt Bacharach/Hal David team received little or no radio airplay. In retrospect, it's hard to believe that Warwick's versions of "What the World Needs Now Is Love," "The Look of Love" (also recorded by Isaac Hayes, Anita Baker, and countless others), and "Make It Easy on Yourself" (a smash for Jerry Butler) weren't major hits. They certainly deserved to be, as did the hauntingly pretty "Any Old Time of the Day" ("Walk on By"'s B-side) and "They Long to Be (Close to You)." For those who might have overlooked this fine material, Hidden Gems is quite a revelation. © Alex Henderson /TiVo

Pop - Released April 15, 2016 | Rhino

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Pop - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino

Dionne Warwick's 12th long-player since 1962 was the follow-up to her first Top Ten album, 1968's acclaimed Valley of the Dolls. Similarly, the same year's Promises, Promises was highlighted by its lead composition. In this instance, Promises, Promises was Neil Simon's adaptation of Billy Wilder's screenplay for the film The Apartment. Although Warwick herself was never cast in the co-lead role of Fran Kubelik, she popularized a handful of selections from the Burt Bacharach/Hal David score. In fact, her upbeat rendering of the title track became the LP's highest-charting cut, placing within the Top 20 during November of 1968. The show additionally yielded a pair of ballads in the intimately yearning "Whoever You Are, I Love You" and "Wanting Things," a haunting languid waltz that is arguably one of the most underappreciated collaborations between the vocalist and composers. Interestingly, the latter is arranged and conducted by Don Sebesky rather than Bacharach, who had likewise directed Warwick on her interpretation of the aforementioned pieces from Promises, Promises. Bacharach and David also supplied the definitive "This Girl's in Love with You," which reached number seven in February of 1969, and the midtempo "Who Is Gonna Love Me?" Others worthy of mention are Peter Matz's arrangement of "Little Green Apples" and "Where Am I Going" from the play Sweet Charity. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Pop - Released December 7, 2009 | Rhino

The aptly titled Presenting Dionne Warwick (1963) was the vocalist's first long-player and quickly established the artist as a suitable vehicle for interpreting the quirky pop melodies of Burt Bacharach (music) and Hal David (lyrics). She met the pair during the summer of 1961 as a background singer during the recording session for the Drifters' minor hit "Mexican Divorce," which had been penned by the lucrative pair. Their initial outing, "Don't Make Me Over," became the first of the alliances between Warwick and the songwriting team to hit the pop chart. The prolific nature of this collaboration resulted in Bacharach and David providing three-quarters of the tunes on this dozen-track album. Interestingly, despite having hits almost instantaneously, Scepter Records co-founder Florence Greenberg initially rejected "Don't Make Me Over" until it began to outperform "I Smiled Yesterday," which had been chosen as the A-side. It was not only her first hit, but in time it likewise distinguished itself as a signature catalog entry when it crossed over onto both the pop and R&B charts, respectively. Warwick's inviting voice was at the core of their successful working relationship, coupled with the undeniably unique and expertly crafted material, yielding a host of classics such as "Wishin' and Hopin'." The version here predates Dusty Springfield's rendering and was likewise much of the reason Springfield chose to cover it to begin with. Other seminal entries featured on Presenting Dionne Warwick are "Make It Easy on Yourself" and the lovelorn melancholy ballad "I Cry Alone," as well as the unique arrangement of "Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah." In 1995, Sequel Records began reissuing vintage Warwick LPs, pairing Presenting with the 1964 follow-up, Anyone Who Had a Heart, on a double-play CD. [Collectors Choice reissued the album in 2007.] © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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International Pop - Released October 31, 1989 | Arista

Dionne Warwick enjoyed a career revival in the late '70s and 1980s when she teamed with such producers as Barry Manilow, Barry Gibb, and even Luther Vandross. They returned her to the elaborately arranged and structured soul-tinged pop that had marked her finest hits, although the lyrics and compositions weren't as consistent as they were during her Burt Bacharach/Hal David period. This album collects the biggest hits from this second phase of Warwick's career, including such triumphs as "Deja Vu" and "I Know I'll Never Love This Way Again"; it also introduced a new tune, "Take Good Care of You And Me." © Ron Wynn /TiVo
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R&B - Released May 17, 2019 | eOne Music

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Pop - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino

Make Way For is Dionne Warwick's third long-player for Scepter Records. The album would eventually be her first to make the charts and was undoubtedly propelled by the hits "Walk on By," "You'll Never Get to Heaven," and "Wishin' and Hopin'" -- all of which became key components of Warwick's performance repertoire. Interestingly, the latter track as well as "I Smiled Yesterday" had also been included on Warwick's debut album, Presenting Dionne Warwick. However, that didn't seem to deter listeners eager for new tunes. Warwick's musical mentors and collaborators Burt Bacharach and Hal David also presented the singer with several additional compositions that would become signature songs for other performers in the ensuing years. "(They Long to Be) Close to You" became synonymous with the Carpenters, while Dusty Springfield shared some of Warwick's notoriety with her own hit version of "Wishin' and Hopin'." The trio of tracks not derived from the voluminous Bacharach/David catalog include Jule Styne's "People," from Funny Girl, as well as a few numbers from a pair of other well-known Brill Building teams of pop songwriters. Gerry Goffin and Carole King serve up "Make the Night a Little Longer," while the arguably lesser-known pairing of Howard Greenfield and Helen Miller offer the somewhat antiquated "Get Rid of Him." © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Pop - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino

Soulful is a major work in Dionne Warwick's deep catalog, and one worthy of study and appreciation. Starting off with a Top 20 hit from October of 1969, her gutsy rendition of "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling," the album shifts from songs containing the sweet and ever present voice found on '60s radio to one of a masterful artist in control, renditions of "Do Right Woman" and the tender approach to "I've Been Loving You Too Long" allowing these copyrights to be heard in a different and intriguing light. Recorded at American Sound Studios in Memphis, TN, with the great Chips Moman engineering and co-producing with Warwick, the only place you'll find the names Burt Bacharach and Hal David is on the label: "A Burt Bacharach-Hal David Production Produced by Chips Moman and Dionne Warwick." In her liner notes on the back cover the singer writes, "I hope you will enjoy experiencing with me the joy and excitement I felt in recording Rhythm and Blues -- my way." To quote blues singer Genya Ravan, "and she means it!" Working with the producer of the Box Tops' "The Letter" and Elvis Presley was a wonderful change and stretch for the woman who was so closely aligned with the music and production of Bacharach and David. Recording in the state that has bragging rights to Graceland was in vogue during the final year of the 1960s and into the early '70s, Steve Cropper's production of Mitch Ryder's The Detroit-Memphis Experiment just another part of the story leading up to the legendary Dusty in Memphis album, perhaps this genre's centerpiece. It's easy to see how a pop princess like Dionne Warwick with such a string of hits could get overlooked -- perhaps by virtue of the sheer volume of her output. The same could be said for Tommy James, whose brilliant My Head, My Bed & My Red Guitar went unnoticed by pop fans too intent on hearing his greatest hits time and again rather than investigating the artist that made those hits. Like Tommy James' Elvis-influenced album, Soulful deserves a very special place in rock history. "We Can Work It Out" is what Otis Redding might have done with the material, while "Hey Jude" has a church-like feel, not immersed in gospel but enough of that flavor to lift it above its pop confines. The short fade with the voices bouncing off the horns was a very nice way to close out the album. There are three Beatles covers as well as some Young Rascals, Aretha, Marvin Gaye/Tammi Terrell, and James & Bobby Purify. Moman also crafted Petula Clark's Memphis this same year, and both Petula and Dionne take on Curtis Mayfield's "People Get Ready," indicating perhaps what these Top 40 singers were feeling in their heart -- the need to express themselves on compositions that they found compelling. "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling" is the standout, not because it was the hit from this collection but because Dionne takes on a new fire, pouring her heart over the great drum work. This version of the song gets little to no airplay on oldies stations, let alone blues and R&B radio, which is tragic. Warwick is a pro as well as a major talent, and Soulful deserves to be treasured as the important musical statement that it is. © Joe Viglione /TiVo
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International Pop - Released October 1, 1982 | Legacy Recordings

The Barry Gibb hit machine of the early '80s kept steam rolling at a frantic pace, and Heartbreaker was a major factor in the equation. While it lacks the genius and soulful grit of Dionne Warwick's earlier classic work, the album was polished and painstakingly produced perfectly for adult pop stations. Heartbreaker was tailor made to be played right next to the soft rock hits of the era and it helped to propel the singer into the spotlight once again. Starting off with a bang courtesy of the title track, Warwick and Gibb go through all of the motions. The track sequencing gives the album a feeling of deflation at first, as tempos gradually decrease until "Take The Short Way Home," which is so Gibb-esque that it could be an outtake from Spirits Having Flown. There are a few fragments of filler, most notably with "All I Love in the World," which is almost a redux of the title track. This is not the most definitive album of Warwick's career, but is definitely one of the few highlights that a pop-heavy '80s afforded her. © Rob Theakston /TiVo
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Pop - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino

Vocalist Dionne Warwick returned to the Burt Bacharach and Hal David stable on 1970's I'll Never Fall in Love Again after the previous year's hugely successful Soulful, an endeavor consisting of R&B covers cut in Memphis, Tennessee, under the direction of Chips Moman. Once back into the fold, Warwick picked right up where 1968's Promises, Promises left off, most notably with "I'll Never Fall in Love Again," a holdover from the Bacharach/David-penned Broadway production Promises, Promises. The upbeat and optimistic "Knowing When to Leave" had likewise been gleaned from the show, which premiered December 1, 1968 at the Shubert Theatre, ultimately running for 1,281 performances. While Warwick would not be a part of the stage cast, she contributed significantly to the popularity of the tunes as she took the title track from this LP and Promises, Promises into the Top 20. "Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head" is given an arrangement strikingly similar to the hit version and was a wise inclusion, as B.J. Thomas' reading would tread familiar ground with listeners. As was her trademark on the vast majority of the Bacharach/David collaborations, Warwick gives the song an appreciably expressive interpretation that seems to effortlessly fit the composition. The same can be said of the infectious jazzy groove on "Paper Mache" and the timelessly quirky and samba-influenced "Loneliness Remembers, What Happiness Forgets," as well as the lightly scored "Odds and Ends." Although exceedingly soulful, the horn section incorporated into George Harrison's "Something" negates much of the melody's inherent intimacy. Conversely, Jimmy Webb's "Didn't We" is stunning with an old-school approach that underscores the gorgeous pop standard balladry. The platter concludes with Paul Anka's "My Way," incrementally building from an airy yet affective take into a full-blown orchestrated epic. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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R&B - Released December 18, 2015 | Legacy Recordings

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Pop - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino

Dionne Warwick followed The Magic of Believing (1968), a collection of spirituals and religious material, with her first Top Ten LP Valley of the Dolls (1968). Interestingly, the familiar rendering of the title track wasn't the one that was in the motion picture. This is all but academic, as the version featured here reached all the way to number two on the Top Singles chart in February of 1968. The André Previn penned movie theme was certainly not the only reason for the album's success as Burt Bacharach and Hal David provide several impressive compositions, most notably the Top Ten "Do You Know the Way to San José." Among their further contributions are the quaint opener "As Long as There's an Apple Tree," plus the soulful ballads "Where Would I Go," and "Let Me Be Lonely." The former has a slightly dark Baroque-flavored melody, while the latter became a lower-tier hit (number 71) and would serve as a staple in Warwick's timeless interpretations of Bacharach/David classics. A few of the other recognizable selections are her take on Jimmy Webb's "Up, Up and Away" that is highlighted by some inspired, albeit uncredited organ licks. In the same recording session that yielded the "(Theme From) Valley of the Dolls," Warwick cut a powerful reading of "You're My World," which had been a sizable side for Cilla Black. The rousing "For the Rest of My Life" is additionally distinguished as the Italian-sung "Dedicato All Amore," her entry in the 1967 San Remo Song Festival. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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R&B - Released December 18, 2015 | Arista - Legacy

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Pop - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino

Dionne Warwick's early- to mid-'60s Scepter Records catalog stands as some of her finest and most prolific work in conjunction with the songwriting team of Burt Bacharach and Hal David. By the time of Here I Am in 1966, the superhuman nature of the trio's relationship had resulted in five long-players in three years, not counting soundtracks and live albums, which would bring the total to seven during the same time. Although some of their most successful collaborations were still ahead of them, the marriage of the duo's well-crafted and distinct pop songs with Warwick's light, supple vocals again resulted in several masterpieces. "Are You There (With Another Girl)," "Window Wishing," "Don't Go Breaking My Heart," and "Long Day, Short Night" are but a few of the hits and listener favorites on this album. In addition to the eight Bacharach/David pieces, Warwick truly demonstrates her versatility as an interpreter on the inimitable cover of the Gershwin standard "I Loves You, Porgy." Her voice conveys the noir tale with haunting resonance. In direct contrast is the joyous "This Little Light," which furthers the evidence supporting her skills as a performer and features Warwick's solo piano accompaniment. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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R&B - Released July 24, 1982 | Arista - Legacy