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Rock - Released January 21, 2011 | Nonesuch

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Sélection Les Inrocks - 3 étoiles Technikart
Self-styled keeper of the flame Jack White is so steeped in roots nostalgia -- he even left his native Detroit for the greener pastures of Nashville, bringing himself closer to the heart of Americana -- that his art rock roots are obscured. After all, this is a guy who purposely restricts his palettes in the White Stripes and named an early album De Stijl after an early 20th century Dutch movement; art and artifice are part of his roots. He brings that artifice to The Party Ain’t Over, a stylized high-profile comeback for Wanda Jackson that is about as far removed from the natural flow of Van Lear Rose, his similar effort for Loretta Lynn, as can be. White seemed to act as midwife to the music on Van Lear Rose, but here he seems to stamp his imprint directly upon Wanda, the legendary rockabilly singer who briefly dated Elvis Presley and cut the incendiary “Fujiyama Mama” and “Let’s Have a Party.” Clearly, the title of this 2011 effort hearkens back to the latter, and White goes out of his way to evoke the '50s of Jackson’s heyday, selecting such rock & roll classics as “Nervous Breakdown,” “Busted,” and “Rip It Up,” but also having her sing the Andrews Sisters' swinging classic “Drinking Rum and Coca Cola” while recasting the modern classics of Bob Dylan's “Thunder on the Mountain” and Amy Winehouse’s “You Know I’m No Good” as retro throwbacks. No matter the source material, the approach is the same: it’s a '50s pastiche, equal parts rockabilly boogie and jump blues blare, accentuated by Jack’s gonzo skronk and Jackson’s sandpaper growl. Conceptually, it’s interesting -- it’s not a re-creation, it’s a purposeful fantasy -- but the sheer ballast of White’s vision can be exhausting, the individual elements clanking chaotically and never quite gelling. Jackson gives as strong as a performance as she can, tearing into the oldies with ease and valiantly attempting the new songs, but she sounds most at ease with the quieter moments, whether it’s “Dust on the Bible” or a stripped-down acoustic “Blue Yodel #6.” These are the moments that feel like they belong to her, with the rest of The Party Ain’t Over being unmistakably of and for Jack White, who leaps at the chance to re-create the ‘50s in his own image. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Nashville

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Rock - Released January 1, 1961 | Capitol Nashville

While this doesn't have most of Wanda's best rockabilly sides (check the compilation Rockin' With Wanda for those), it's a pretty solid and energetic set. About half of it is taken up with retreads of the "Let's Have a Party" theme and covers of early rock hits like "Tweedlee Dee" and "Kansas City" which are, admittedly, well done. "Fallin'" and especially, "Hard Headed Woman" are really fine cuts that rank among her best rock & roll performances. The real surprise of this album is the lightning-speed rockabilly riffing by Roy Clark; his playing on "Hard Headed Woman" is downright savage, almost enough to redeem all those horrible Hee-Haw programs. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1963 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1961 | Capitol Nashville

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Rock - Released January 1, 2003 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 2007 | EMI Gold

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Country - Released June 2, 2008 | CMH Records

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Country - Released November 11, 2019 | Age Of Empire

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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Sugar Hill Records

On 2011's The Party Ain't Over, Jack White took it upon himself to remind the world of the greatness of Wanda Jackson, the first lady of rockabilly, by creating a great and gaudy musical spectacle in which the headlining artist often got lost in the shuffle of her own album. A year later, Jackson headed back into the studio, this time with Justin Townes Earle behind the controls, and the title Unfinished Business faintly suggests this album was meant as a corrective to the folly of her collaboration with White. It certainly suits Jackson and her gifts better than The Party Ain't Over; Earle has set Jackson up with a solid studio band (usually just guitar, bass, keys, drums, and sometimes pedal steel) and for the most part, they kept out of her way, giving her just enough space to show she still has the goods. Jackson's instrument is weaker than it was in her prime -- no great surprise from a woman nearly 75 years old -- but her phrasing is still on target, and she's got spunk and attitude to spare; when she tells off a two-timing suitor on "Pushover," the scenario not only sounds plausible, but you sure don't want to be in that guy's shoes. Unfinished Business nods to the totality of Jackson's career, so while old-school rock & roll dominates the set, she also shows off her estimable skills singing vintage country (particularly on "What Do You Do When You're Lonesome," written by Earle, and "Am I Even a Memory," in which he delivers a fine duet vocal) and gospel (a fervent take on Townes Van Zandt's "Two Hands"). And Jackson shows her mettle on two surprising selections -- she sounds tough and sassy on Bobby Womack's classic "It's All Over Now," and delivers a warm, graceful interpretation of the Jeff Tweedy/Woody Guthrie collaboration "California Stars." Wanda Jackson's best records were simple at heart -- give the gal a good song and a good band, and she can do the rest. Unfinished Business shows that six decades after her first recordings, that strategy still works, and she can still deliver the goods without a lot of needless fuss. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Rockabilly - Released June 11, 2020 | Music Manager

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Country - Released January 1, 1971 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1967 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1970 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1967 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1970 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released May 1, 1960 | Capitol Nashville

Absolutely the best collection of Wanda Jackson's rockabilly recordings, including her key 1956-1960 singles -- "Fujiyama Mama," "Mean Mean Man," "Hot Dog! That Made Him Mad," and others. Rockin' with Wanda! is a leading candidate for the best female rock & roll album of the 1950s. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1964 | EMI Music Nashville (ERN)

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Country - Released January 1, 1968 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1969 | Capitol Nashville