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Rock - Released January 21, 2011 | Nonesuch

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Sélection Les Inrocks - 3 étoiles Technikart
Self-styled keeper of the flame Jack White is so steeped in roots nostalgia -- he even left his native Detroit for the greener pastures of Nashville, bringing himself closer to the heart of Americana -- that his art rock roots are obscured. After all, this is a guy who purposely restricts his palettes in the White Stripes and named an early album De Stijl after an early 20th century Dutch movement; art and artifice are part of his roots. He brings that artifice to The Party Ain’t Over, a stylized high-profile comeback for Wanda Jackson that is about as far removed from the natural flow of Van Lear Rose, his similar effort for Loretta Lynn, as can be. White seemed to act as midwife to the music on Van Lear Rose, but here he seems to stamp his imprint directly upon Wanda, the legendary rockabilly singer who briefly dated Elvis Presley and cut the incendiary “Fujiyama Mama” and “Let’s Have a Party.” Clearly, the title of this 2011 effort hearkens back to the latter, and White goes out of his way to evoke the '50s of Jackson’s heyday, selecting such rock & roll classics as “Nervous Breakdown,” “Busted,” and “Rip It Up,” but also having her sing the Andrews Sisters' swinging classic “Drinking Rum and Coca Cola” while recasting the modern classics of Bob Dylan's “Thunder on the Mountain” and Amy Winehouse’s “You Know I’m No Good” as retro throwbacks. No matter the source material, the approach is the same: it’s a '50s pastiche, equal parts rockabilly boogie and jump blues blare, accentuated by Jack’s gonzo skronk and Jackson’s sandpaper growl. Conceptually, it’s interesting -- it’s not a re-creation, it’s a purposeful fantasy -- but the sheer ballast of White’s vision can be exhausting, the individual elements clanking chaotically and never quite gelling. Jackson gives as strong as a performance as she can, tearing into the oldies with ease and valiantly attempting the new songs, but she sounds most at ease with the quieter moments, whether it’s “Dust on the Bible” or a stripped-down acoustic “Blue Yodel #6.” These are the moments that feel like they belong to her, with the rest of The Party Ain’t Over being unmistakably of and for Jack White, who leaps at the chance to re-create the ‘50s in his own image. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 2002 | Capitol Nashville

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Like many other young recording artists of the late 1950s, especially those on major labels, Wanda Jackson was encouraged to straddle musical genres as a hedge against changing trends. She was an accomplished rockabilly singer, but Capitol Records must have worried about how long rockabilly was going to stay popular, so Wanda Jackson has the singer cutting tracks in several other styles -- most frequently country. Her rockabilly fans may have been surprised to hear her first full-length album, which leaned more toward country and also showed off her affinity for straight pop. True, she did cover "Long Tall Sally" and "Money, Honey," and she did a particularly raucous version of "Let's Have a Party" (which surprisingly took off for the pop Top 40 two years after the album's release). But more typical of the sound of the album overall were her versions of Kitty Wells' "Making Believe" and Don Everly's "Here We Are Again," traditional country material, and she even tried her hand at Patti Page's 1954 hit "Let Me Go, Lover!," a pop ballad. Add it all up, and you had one versatile singer, able to sing convincingly anything that was thrown at her. The variety made sense at the time, even if subsequent fans may wish Jackson had rocked out a bit more. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 2002 | Capitol Nashville

Absolutely the best collection of Wanda Jackson's rockabilly recordings, including her key 1956-1960 singles -- "Fujiyama Mama," "Mean Mean Man," "Hot Dog! That Made Him Mad," and others. Rockin' with Wanda! is a leading candidate for the best female rock & roll album of the 1950s. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 2011 | Varese Sarabande

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Rock - Released January 1, 2003 | Capitol Nashville

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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Sugar Hill Records

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Country - Released November 11, 2019 | Age Of Empire

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Country - Released January 1, 1969 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1971 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released June 2, 2008 | CMH Records

Wanda Jackson was, and, it seems, remains, almost 50 years later, the undisputed queen of rockabilly. Her self-titled comeback album from 2001 was a stellar example of her remaining rock & roll swagger, but this time out, she has a host of the faithful famous paying tribute. Dave Alvin, Elvis Costello, the Cramps, Lee Rocker, and the Cadillac Angels all join the rollicking festivities. Given a killer collection of songs, such as Paul Kennerley's title track with backing vocal support from Siedah Garrett, to a smoking version of the Louvin Brothers' "Cash on the Barrelhead," to the wooly instrumentation on some cuts -- such as the Cramps burning through Charlie McCoy's "Funnel of Love" with her -- Jackson's range seems indomitable and her voice is still in fine shape. Rosie Flores' help on the swinging "Woman Walk Out the Door" is a modern honky tonk masterpiece. The duet with Costello, a moving version of Buck Owens' "Crying Time," is simply one of the finest country-duet performances out there and deserves a Grammy. But it's on the tracks on which Jackson appears with her band, such as "Mean Mean Man," "Riot in Cell Block No. 9," and "It Happens Every Time" (Alvin plays guitar on them, but does not sing) with Jackson handling all the vocals that work the best. Simply put, this is a rock & roll dream, full of raw, sharp performances, killer songs, and Jackson's irrepressible ability to take even the most innocent song and make it salacious. ~ Thom Jurek
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Country - Released January 1, 1970 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released October 5, 2018 | Acrobat

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Country - Released January 1, 1972 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1968 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 2007 | EMI Gold

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Country - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1961 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1973 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 23, 2020 | Golden Bridge Records

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Country - Released January 1, 1969 | Capitol Nashville