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Metal - Released August 2, 2019 | Vertigo Berlin

For Denmark's Volbeat, the truly classic rock era existed from 1953 to about 1986: from Chuck Berry and Elvis to the heyday of punk rock and thrash metal, with periods in between where rockabilly, surf, glam, and hard rock flourished. Volbeat possess the chops, imagination, and swagger to carry it off in front of 50,000 European fans. Rewind, Replay, Rebound is the band's seventh album; it's appreciably different from what they've done before, but not completely. Volbeat, led by songwriter, guitarist, and lead vocalist Michael Poulson, have brought in even more hooks and sophisticated melodies without losing their ability to riff and roar with the best of the metal pack, thanks in no small part to ex-Anthrax lead guitarist Rob Caggiano. It's the band's first album to feature new bassist Kaspar Boye Larsen. Produced by longtime collaborator Jacob Hansen, its 14 songs revolve around themes of immortality and innocence, and how the pursuit of perfection ultimately leads to emptiness. Opener "Last Day Under the Sun" is inspired by the life and lyrics of Johnny Cash; it includes welcome re-appearances from backing vocalist Mia Maja and the Harlem Gospel Choir, with a fist-pumping chorus and enormous, hooky guitars (a la early Boston). "Pelvis on Fire" is a clash of sounds and eras: It sounds as if a young Misfits created a medley of their early singles with rockabilly icon Jack Scott's "The Way I Walk." "Rewind the Exit" is a soaring midtempo ballad with chiming guitars and singalong chorus ballasted by a suspenseful hard rock breakdown in the bridge. "Die to Live" is a charging, melodic punk-cum-rockabilly-cum-Born to Run-era Springsteen in middle-eight. Neil Fallon of Clutch guests on vocals and there's a Clarence Clemons-esque saxophone break. "When We Were Kids" commences acoustically though that changes quickly; its melody reflects the writing prowess of Doc Pomus and Jack Nitzsche before it shifts gears to become a teen anthem worthy of Queen circa Sheer Heart Attack. "Cloud 9" offers another jewel-like showcase for Maja, who turns the midtempo rocker into the stuff dreams are made of. Exodus/Slayer guitarist Gary Holt delivers a killer solo on the glammed-up "Cheapside Sloggers" before introducing a chugging, guitar-wrangling metal breakdown. Punters were understandably miffed when Volbeat issued the 38-second "Parasite" as a single. It's presented here as intended: as an intro to "Leviathan" -- its power punk glam riff would make Johnny Thunders' ghost cheer from beyond. "The Everlasting" is the set outlier; it charges full-on into vintage Metallica power metal albeit with a trademark Volbeat chorus for balance. Closer "7:24" is 21st century power pop worthy of Dwight Twilley with excellent lyrics. Rewind, Replay, Rebound may be a couple of tracks too long, but when the songs are this great, that's a very small caveat. Volbeat have long been superstars in their native Europe for quite a while, but this album should go a long way to establishing them as festival headliners across the rest of the globe. ~ Thom Jurek
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Metal - Released December 14, 2018 | Vertigo Berlin

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Metal - Released December 8, 2014 | Mascot Records

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Rock - Released April 22, 2009 | Mascot Records

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Metal - Released November 21, 2011 | Vertigo Berlin

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Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | Mascot Records

On their raucous 2008 outing Rock the Rebel/Metal the Devil, Danish ensemble Volbeat mix metal with a melodic 1960s rock & roll influence. Frontman Michael Paulson sounds like a fusion of late-era Elvis and early Misfits Glenn Danzig, particularly on the propulsive “Radio Girl,” making for one of the most enjoyable European metal releases of the year. ~ Eric Schneider
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Metal - Released August 5, 2016 | Vertigo Berlin

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Metal - Released May 15, 2019 | Vertigo Berlin

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Metal - Released January 1, 2013 | Vertigo Berlin

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Metal - Released June 13, 2019 | Vertigo Berlin

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Metal - Released January 1, 2012 | Vertigo Berlin

A first listen to Danish "metal rockers" Volbeat's Beyond Hell/Above Heaven, reveals how completely they've consolidated all the elements they've experimented with since 2007's Rock the Rebel/Metal the Devil: punk, roots rock & roll, rockabilly, heavy metal, death metal, country, and '70s hard rock. Power chords, hooky melodies, chanted choruses, lyric themes obsessed with the no-man's land that exists between -- and beyond -- good and evil, and the sense of hard partying recklessness simultaneously reflect influences as wide as Social Distortion, the Misfits, AC/DC, and Metallica, Judas Priest, and Exodus. Once more recorded and engineered by Jacob Hansen, Beyond Hell/Above Heaven extends the narrative that began on Guitar Gangsters & Cadillac Blood with two more chapters in the saga via the tracks "7 Shots," and opener "The Mirror and the Ripper." The former is a perfect aural illustration of Volbeat's ability to integrate seemingly disparate elements by including banjos (courtesy of Rod Sinclair), bluesman Anders Pederson's slide guitar work, and the heavy metal axe chugging of Kreator's Mille Petrozza and Mercyful Fate-King Diamond six-string pyrotechnician Michael Denner. "Heaven and Hell" is pure AC/DC power riffage sent dimensionally askew by Henrik Hall's killer bluesy harmonica work that transforms the tune melodically into something that balances the Phil Spector-esque side of Glenn Danzig's melodic sensibilities (on the earliest Misfits singles) and late-'70s metal. This cut is followed immediately by the harder, darker, death metal of "Who They Are" that nonetheless carries within it an irresistible, nearly anthemic chorus. Likewise "A Warrior's Call," with its furious doom-and-gloom intro that gives way to a big, bad, strutting rock & roll stomper. "Fallen" recalls the Foo Fighters' "Everlong" in approach, yet is heavier still. The thrash end happens on "Evelyn," with guest vocals by Napalm Death's Mark "Barney" Greenway on the verses before Michael Poulsen adds his trademark lyricism in the chorus. (And this is to say little of the skittering punk-country of "Being 1," an irrepressible love song with teeth.) Any way you slice it, Volbeat, a skillful repository of so many lineage sounds, are their own thing: a band apart who are sophisticated, accessible, and utterly entertaining as songwriters and performers. Nowhere is this more true than on Beyond Hell/Above Heaven. ~ Thom Jurek

Metal - Released January 1, 2010 | Vertigo Berlin

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Metal - Released July 18, 2019 | Vertigo Berlin

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Metal - Released July 26, 2019 | Vertigo Berlin

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Metal - Released June 3, 2016 | Vertigo Berlin

Booklet
Seal the Deal & Let's Boogie may be the album that finally makes Volbeat rock & roll superstars in the U.S -- they are everywhere else. That said, the follow-up to 2013's brilliant Outlaw Gentlemen & Shady Ladies may seem, at least for longtime fans, a surprising choice for a breakthrough. Ex-Anthrax guitarist Rob Caggiano joined the band after producing and playing on the 2013 date, and he cements his position here. He co-produced this with vocalist Michael Poulson and Jacob Hansen. His original riffs and mad shredding have made the band's sound -- already unique -- iconic. While the record's title -- as wonderfully strange and catchy as its predecessors -- signifies a hard-partying set, there is something else afoot here. The album is divided into distinct halves. The first is darker and moodier, though infectious melodies and dynamics abound. Song topics often refer to historical characters who have an unshakable belief in the powers and principalities of the spiritual world. The opening single, "The Devil's Bleeding Crown," hit the top spot on Billboard's Mainstream Rock chart. Poulsen remains one of rock's most charismatic frontmen. He soars above the swaggering, streetwise boogying riff and clattering drum swing. He teases the melody out of this powerful attack and brings it home. The shredding solo by Caggiano is an added plus. It segues into "Marie Laveau," which inverts the first tune's riff and delivers a different compulsively catchy melodic refrain. "The Bliss," a midtempo hooky rocker, offers a banjo breakdown in the bridge before chugging back to its catchy lyric. Danko Jones guests on "Black Rose." His rougher, edgier vocals contrast with the smoother ones of Poulsen as edgy '70s glam metal meets early-'60s "oooohhhh--ahhhhh--oooooo" pop in the backing chorus. The tight guitar break and crackling riff make it irresistible. The second half is looser. It commences with a cover of the Ramones-worshiping Teenage Bottlerocket's "Rebound." It's faithful but nonetheless has been remade in Volbeat's hard-rocking retro image. Poulsen's declarative sincerity in the lyric of "Goodbye Forever" contains a surprise. A tight, anthemic hook pairs acoustic guitars and the bells of ride cymbals to color the middle of the mix. Already a great song, after a swirling bridge the Harlem Gospel Choir enters, delivers the fist-pumping chorus, and accompanies Poulsen for the duration. The title track is a real showcase for Caggiano and a certain candidate to open shows. Unfortunately, the reading of the Georgia Satellites' "Battleship Chains" is too reverential and feels out of place. Set closer "The Loa's Crossroad" is a rager, though it contains a bagpipe breakdown that only adds to its ferocity. Seal the Deal & Let's Boogie possesses all the elements that make Volbeat impossible to compare or pigeonhole. That said, while it delivers on the ambition of its predecessor, it lacks its acute focus. But for its missteps as well as its strengths, it doesn't disappoint. It rocks. Hopefully, it will transition them to top of the pile where they belong. ~ Thom Jurek
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Metal - Released December 11, 2018 | Vertigo Berlin

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Metal - Released August 5, 2016 | Vertigo Berlin

Booklet
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Metal - Released October 30, 2018 | Vertigo Berlin

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Metal - Released August 2, 2019 | Vertigo Berlin

For Denmark's Volbeat, the truly classic rock era existed from 1953 to about 1986: from Chuck Berry and Elvis to the heyday of punk rock and thrash metal, with periods in between where rockabilly, surf, glam, and hard rock flourished. Volbeat possess the chops, imagination, and swagger to carry it off in front of 50,000 European fans. Rewind, Replay, Rebound is the band's seventh album; it's appreciably different from what they've done before, but not completely. Volbeat, led by songwriter, guitarist, and lead vocalist Michael Poulson, have brought in even more hooks and sophisticated melodies without losing their ability to riff and roar with the best of the metal pack, thanks in no small part to ex-Anthrax lead guitarist Rob Caggiano. It's the band's first album to feature new bassist Kaspar Boye Larsen. Produced by longtime collaborator Jacob Hansen, its 14 songs revolve around themes of immortality and innocence, and how the pursuit of perfection ultimately leads to emptiness. Opener "Last Day Under the Sun" is inspired by the life and lyrics of Johnny Cash; it includes welcome re-appearances from backing vocalist Mia Maja and the Harlem Gospel Choir, with a fist-pumping chorus and enormous, hooky guitars (a la early Boston). "Pelvis on Fire" is a clash of sounds and eras: It sounds as if a young Misfits created a medley of their early singles with rockabilly icon Jack Scott's "The Way I Walk." "Rewind the Exit" is a soaring midtempo ballad with chiming guitars and singalong chorus ballasted by a suspenseful hard rock breakdown in the bridge. "Die to Live" is a charging, melodic punk-cum-rockabilly-cum-Born to Run-era Springsteen in middle-eight. Neil Fallon of Clutch guests on vocals and there's a Clarence Clemons-esque saxophone break. "When We Were Kids" commences acoustically though that changes quickly; its melody reflects the writing prowess of Doc Pomus and Jack Nitzsche before it shifts gears to become a teen anthem worthy of Queen circa Sheer Heart Attack. "Cloud 9" offers another jewel-like showcase for Maja, who turns the midtempo rocker into the stuff dreams are made of. Exodus/Slayer guitarist Gary Holt delivers a killer solo on the glammed-up "Cheapside Sloggers" before introducing a chugging, guitar-wrangling metal breakdown. Punters were understandably miffed when Volbeat issued the 38-second "Parasite" as a single. It's presented here as intended: as an intro to "Leviathan" -- its power punk glam riff would make Johnny Thunders' ghost cheer from beyond. "The Everlasting" is the set outlier; it charges full-on into vintage Metallica power metal albeit with a trademark Volbeat chorus for balance. Closer "7:24" is 21st century power pop worthy of Dwight Twilley with excellent lyrics. Rewind, Replay, Rebound may be a couple of tracks too long, but when the songs are this great, that's a very small caveat. Volbeat have long been superstars in their native Europe for quite a while, but this album should go a long way to establishing them as festival headliners across the rest of the globe. ~ Thom Jurek
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Metal - Released November 20, 2018 | Vertigo Berlin