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Violin Concertos - Released September 7, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Duets - Released November 17, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Vilde Frang’s Homage is more than a captivating programme of short pieces for violin and piano, it is also a homage to the players of the Golden Age of the Violin, such as Fritz Kreisler, Leopold Auer and Joseph Szigeti. Vilde Frang has conceived the album as something of a homage to her illustrious predecessors. Born in 1986, she is clearly very much a violinist of today, and – as a Norwegian trained in Germany – she did not grow up in the Central and Eastern-European tradition of Heifetz, Kreisler, Auer and Szigeti. That being said, she brings her own, distinctively captivating magic to her instrument. © Warner Classics
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Classical - Released February 9, 2015 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released June 4, 2012 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Norwegian violinist Vilde Frang made her debut in 2010 with a pairing of concertos by Sibelius and Prokofiev. She repeats the formula here with works by Nielsen and Tchaikovsky, a somewhat risky move. But the fact is that she's exceptionally good in these repertories. Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35, is in a way a work constrained by its tremendous virtuosity and the long performing tradition of which it is a part. It's hard to come up with something really new to say to it, but Frang makes a strong contribution with a graceful reading that avoids the tendency to push the big passages of the outer movement to a point just short of (or, in concert, just past) where a string breaks from the effort to get maximum volume out of it. Instead she favors detailed shaping of complicated stretches of passagework. It's quite distinctive, but the real news here is the Nielsen Violin Concerto, Op. 33, which had its premiere in 1912 and is not terribly often performed. It's a complex work in a mixture of idioms, from what annotator David Fanning calls neo-Baroque (actually much of it anticipates the sparkling neo-Mozartian language of the opera Maskarade), to developing figuration that anticipates the structures of Nielsen's symphonic works, to Tchaikovskian passages. These last help tie the program together in a novel way: how did Nielsen, a generation after Sibelius, react to the sounds of Tchaikovsky in his head? The Danish Radio Symphony Orchestra under Eivind Gullberg Jensen is not much more than workmanlike, but this is overall a fresh treatment of some highly familiar music and some that is less so.
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Classical - Released February 26, 2016 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month
"From Korngold’s Romantic patchwork to Britten’s high seriousness (and his obsessive working of scalic material) is quite a leap, yet, with these exponents, there’s no hint of the latter overreaching himself in this extended, bleakly eloquent take on the Prokofiev violin concerto model. Indeed, the argument is projected with such searing intensity that the work asserts its claim to be considered one of the masterpieces of the last century. Once again Frang proves immaculate above the stave; and, because the third-movement passacaglia never gets bogged down in the manner of Vengerov and Rostropovich or Little and Gardner, the sense of looming threat is ever present through to the equivocal close. While Marwood and Volkov make the whole concerto feel more contemporary, brisker from the outset, texturally spikier and more fractured than Lubotsky with Britten himself as conductor, there are other aesthetic possibilities. Whatever the work’s pockets of English reserve, Frang refuses to undersell those passionate outbursts fuelled by the composer’s political and moral convictions during and after the Spanish Civil War. This is a remarkable rendition, at once spacious and tautly held together, cool where it needs to be but eminently emotive with just the right kind of ‘perilous sweetness’. The soloist’s tone is never remotely wiry or frayed and the harmonics are simply sensational." Gramophone, 2016
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Classical - Released March 7, 2011 | Warner Classics

Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released February 9, 2015 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
There is certainly no shortage of recordings of the Mozart works on this release by Norwegian violinist Vilde Frang, but the performers manage to stand out with intelligent programming and distinctive playing. The Violin Concerto No. 1 in B flat major, K. 207, and Violin Concerto No. 5 in A major, K. 219, work precisely because Frang does not try to make too much of them: her playing in these early Mozart works is brilliant and bright, and they function as something of an overture to the main attraction, the Sinfonia concertante in E flat major, K. 364. Frang who gets all the space in the graphics (and who can blame Warner Classics for this?), but in the Sinfonia concertante veteran violist Maxim Rysanov is an equal partner, and it's here that this recording really stands out. The usual way with this duo concerto is for the two soloists to match each other's styles and let Mozart's melodies come to the fore, but here is a real dialogue in the Romantic way. It's unusual, but it works, especially in the slow movement. The recording is in no way overdone; the chamber orchestra Arcangelo under Jonathan Cohen provides spare, crisp accompaniment, and the combination of the sparse texture with the distinct soloist personalities is compelling. The cadenzas in the violin concertos, one of them by Joseph Joachim, add another Romantic note. This album both hangs together well and is a great deal of fun. Highly recommended.
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Classical - Released August 27, 2009 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released February 5, 2016 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released September 7, 2018 | Warner Classics

Booklet
As a concerto soloist and chamber musician, Vilde Frang explores what might be considered public and private aspects of her art, though in both pursuits, her expressive and deeply internalized playing belies any simplistic division between the two. In this 2018 Warner Classics release of Béla Bartók's Violin Concerto No. 1 and George Enescu's Octet for strings in C major, Op. 7, Frang meets all expectations of a virtuoso soloist in the former work and takes a more collaborative approach in the latter, yet between them there is an overlapping of musical aims. Introspection is the dominant mood in the first movement of Bartók's youthful concerto, and Frang maintains a controlled lyricism that is both melancholy and ardent, only to be dispelled by the brusque second movement, which calls for flashiness and extroversion. However, the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France is held in check by conductor Mikko Franck, so Frang's moody solos are never overwhelmed by the accompaniment, which sometimes is quite loud. The string octet in Enescu's work is surprisingly full-sounding and resembles a string orchestra in its volume and richness, though Frang's distinctive sound is never lost in the mix. Yet for all the rustic hubbub of this energetic music, Frang conveys a pensiveness in the intimate third movement that reminds the listener that this is still chamber music, not a concerto. Warner's recorded sound seems a bit manipulated to even out the wide dynamics in the Bartók and the booming acoustics in the Enescu, which contribute to the octet's unnaturally big sound.
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Classical - Released November 17, 2017 | Warner Classics

Booklet
The "homage" being paid here is not to a single individual, but, Vilde Frang explains, to the early 20th century's great violinists collectively, represented by the pieces they played as short encores. There have been other collections of such works since control was wrested from modernist gatekeepers and it became permissible to enjoy them again, but Frang here offers an unusually good survey that catches the sheer fun of the music, differentiates the styles of the violinists involved, and resurrects some lost pieces. In the latter category comes La capricciosa of Franz Ries, nephew to Beethoven's student Ferdinand Ries, with a work that touches on Brahms as it threads its way among various displays. The Tango of "Poldowski," a pseudonym for Henryk Wieniawski's Polish-British daughter Régine (or Irène, or Irina), a female composer who has been ignored as others have been rediscovered, has the violin standing in for a guitar-headed tango group. Her father appears in the most spectacular work of the bunch, the mazurka called Obertass. Much of the album is devoted to transcriptions; in this group the icy technician Heifetz and the evanescently melodic Kreisler loom large, in elegant contrast, but lesser-known names like Léon Roques and Joseph Szigeti appear along the way in a beautifully constructed program. Accompanist José Gallardo gives Frang room and stays out of her way. Brava!
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Classical - Released October 20, 2017 | Warner Classics