Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 21, 2009 | Constellation

From
CD$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 27, 2007 | Constellation

From
HI-RES$16.49
CD$11.49

Alternative & Indie - Released June 30, 2017 | New West Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$16.49
CD$11.49

Alternative & Indie - Released April 22, 2017 | New West Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$11.49

Rock - Released October 2, 2009 | Vapor Records

From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$10.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 24, 2017 | New West Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 21, 2001 | Velocette Records

Sounding more upbeat and a whole lot more soulful than on previous outings, Vic Chesnutt has invited the Dixie-fried experimental group Lambchop along with his wife Tina into the studio for his sixth album, a concept about a traveling salesman. Salesman and Bernadette sounds less like his usual doleful, sometimes baleful, Southern Gothic self and is perhaps his best recording yet. Chesnutt's is a vulnerable voice, and though he can project frailty, his M.O. isn't pity-inducing; in fact, he's quite humorous. "Duty Free" sounds like a New Orleans funeral march. The Lambchop horn section ape the Tijuana Brass to a hip-hop beat on "Replenished." "Maiden" has a sweet melody, driven by vibes and a very subtle horn line. "Until the Led" has the spunk and spirit of R.E.M.'s "Can't Get There from Here" and "So. Central Rain"; Chesnutt draws on that keening vocal quality that probably appealed to his early mentor, Michael Stipe, in the first place. But even R.E.M. in all their new experimentation would never have let the horns run to the border like they do here. The best thing of all is that Chesnutt's "new direction" still has a warm, organic and homespun quality -- the very things that were missing on then-recent recordings by his Athens, GA brothers. © Denise Sullivan /TiVo
From
HI-RES$16.49
CD$11.49

Alternative & Indie - Released February 10, 2017 | New West Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$8.99

Folk/Americana - Released October 28, 2008 | Orange Twin

From
CD$10.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 24, 2017 | New West Records

Probably as good an album as Chesnutt has made, Is the Actor Happy? verifies his standing as one of the most relevant songwriters of the '90s. Pristine production that insures that not a note is wasted or out of place, it provides the perfect vehicle for Chesnutt's slice-of-life short stories. At times more accessible than the average Chesnutt record with instantly engaging tracks like "Gravity of the Situation," "Onion Soup" and "Guilty By Association" (featuring Michael Stipe), it is still not by any means a light-hearted affair. The album is a beautiful testament to Chesnutt's unique voice and the adversity that he's been through. Heartbreakingly delicate folk rock arrangements are followed by crashing guitar crescendos as the perfect vehicles for taking Chesnutt's songs to places very few songwriters have been or can go. © Matt Fink /TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Rock - Released May 3, 2000 | Fundamental Records

From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$10.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 27, 2017 | New West Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$16.49
CD$11.49

Alternative & Indie - Released July 14, 2017 | New West Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$11.99

Film Soundtracks - Released July 31, 2009 | City Slang

From
CD$10.99

Alternative & Indie - Released July 14, 2017 | New West Records

As suggested by the broad and eccentrically cinematic sweep of his songs, Vic Chesnutt is a songwriter not afraid to think big, and many of his best records have found the tunesmith working with large-scale musical accompaniment, most notably 1998's The Salesman and Bernadette (cut with the Nashville chamber-twang ensemble Lambchop) and 2003's Silver Lake (cut with a full-bodied studio ensemble in the grand 1970s manner). Released in 2005, Ghetto Bells finds Chesnutt working with a much smaller but inarguably stellar combo -- master guitarist Bill Frisell, Van Dyke Parks on keyboards and accordion, percussionist Don Heffington, and Dominic Genova and Tina Chesnutt trading off on bass. There's no denying the skill and intelligence of the players, who lend both strong individual talents and an admirable gift for collaboration to these recordings, but this is also an album that sounds a bit more intimate than it reads. As a lyricist, Chesnutt's poetic vision keeps getting broader and reaching farther with each album, and despite the talents of the musicians here, on several tracks the music simply lacks the physical strength to handle the lyrical weight of Chesnutt's material (though this isn't always the case -- the gloriously wheezy string synthesizer Parks plays on "Virginia" gives the tune an appropriately loopy grandeur, and the skeletal rhythmic framework of "Gnats" suits the material perfectly). None of the players on Ghetto Bells makes a wrong move here, with Frisell in particularly stellar form, but producer John Chelew doesn't give this music a sound as large, ambitious, and full of wonder as Chesnutt reaches for in his songs. Which isn't to say that Ghetto Bells fails -- it has far too many wonderful moments to deserve that appellation, and the glorious interplay between Chesnutt and accompanying vocalist Liz Durrett on "What Do You Mean?" alone justifies its existence. But there's something about Ghetto Bells that suggests we're listening to the pan-and-scan version of a disc that was meant to be heard in glorious CinemaScope. And Chesnutt deserves nothing less. © Mark Deming /TiVo
From
CD$9.99

Rock - Released February 10, 2017 | New West Records

From
CD$11.49

Alternative & Indie - Released April 22, 2017 | New West Records

Vic Chesnutt is a very unique, peculiar personality and songwriter who shares the company of folks like Kristin Hersh, Mary Margaret O'Hara, Victoria Williams, Howe Gelb, and Benjamin Smoke. He's a charter member of that pantheon of brilliant songwriters and performers who are all defined by singularity, but are not ruled by quirk and never allow themselves to fall into self-parody. All play a skewed, refracted version of Americana that is haunting, funny, poignant, and occasionally mystical, usually all at once. West of Rome is a spare, skeletal record that's inhabited by all of the aforementioned qualities, is beautiful in its simplicity and finds strength in imperfection. Chesnutt's craggy voice, classical guitar, and outrageous imagination are his tools, and his performances were faithfully preserved by Scott Stuckey's resonant living room production. After a few spins, listening to Chesnutt and company sound like they're playing in your living room, the record begins to sound familiar; its nooks and crannies, cracks and crevices start to feel homey and comfortable, like an old house or an old friend. There's a humble magic that West of Rome perpetuates that is ultimately the most enchanting thing about it -- it offers a gentle reminder of things that are far too often taken for granted to those who care to listen. © Bryan Carroll /TiVo
From
CD$10.99

Alternative & Indie - Released June 30, 2017 | New West Records

In many ways, Vic Chesnutt fits more comfortably in the great tradition of Southern literature than Southern rock & roll -- with his elegant, slightly off-kilter wordplay and comfortably elliptical storytelling style, Chesnutt has as much in common with, say, Flannery O'Connor as anyone in contemporary music. Which is to say that Vic Chesnutt doesn't sound much like anyone else, which is at once his blessing and his curse; it's hard to pitch him to most people because he's unique to the point of being an anomaly, but once you've acquired a taste for Chesnutt's emotionally generous eccentricity, it's hard to get enough of him. While Silver Lake sounds like a Vic Chesnutt album through and through, it's also a better than average introduction to the man's work; here, producer and engineer Mark Howard gives the performances an open, natural sound that puts the top-shelf band assembled for the occasion (including Doug Pettibone, Darryl Johnson, Patrick Warren, and Don Heffington) at its best advantage, and Chesnutt himself is in superb voice, inhabiting his characters with the sure and easy grace of a gifted actor. But the best thing about a Vic Chesnutt album is always the songs, and that's certainly the case here; in Chesnutt's world, life-changing romance can be found at band camp, the gulf between the sexes is at once funny and tragic, a eunuch can understand the love of both body and spirit better than the sultan he serves, and love can wound and soothe given the circumstances -- Chesnutt's stories always strike an honest and recognizable emotional chord, no matter how oddball the situations that surround them. You're not going to hear an evocation of love like "Sharing breakfast from one plate/Holding hands over loved ones' graves/Do you think I deserve it?/I say yes in my way yes" from anyone else, and the curious but heart-tugging beauty of lines like this are all the reason you need to give Vic Chesnutt and Silver Lake an honored space in your record collection. © Mark Deming /TiVo
From
CD$10.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 27, 2017 | New West Records

Vic Chesnutt is a singer/songwriter who can divide a room, and that might be one of the highest compliments one can pay. Listeners can be turned off by his personal style that values storytelling -- though not necessarily straightforward narrative -- over smooth and even-metered rhymes. But his legion of fans -- including many singer/songwriters -- embrace these very distinguishing characteristics. He is surely an original, taking up traditional music streams folk, country, rock & roll, and producing his own idiosyncratic song style. It is tempting to place Chesnutt in the Southern gothic literary tradition. There is a certain Southern flavor in his songwriting -- Southern in the sense that the lyrics are peopled with misfit outsiders who forge their own way, all described through Chesnutt's own cracked lens. But Chesnutt's scope extends well beyond the South, with allusions ranging from the San Franciscan ex-patriot dancer Isadora Duncan to the English poet Stevie Smith, whose voice is heard here in an aural-collage tribute. Michael Stipe, who produced Little, felt compelled to get the songs recorded after seeing live performances of Chesnutt. Stipe described Chesnutt as "an acerbic reporter on the events of the town (Athens, Georgia), who could've been lost forever." The folky and folksy songs on Little are all treated with a DIY spirit and an unflinching eye, both of which probably come in part from Chesnutt's background in indie/punk rock as well as his regional influence. Though Little is a dense work, with often unwieldy verbiage, with melody occasionally sacrificed in favor of getting a line out, Chesnutt nevertheless sings some gorgeous pop-flavored tunes. At times, as in the opening song, "Isadora Duncan," the singer caps off verses of cascading imagery and dialogue with a simple singalong chorus, like early Bob Dylan: "Once I dreamed I was dancing with Isadora Duncan/in a silver cafe/It was a cafe not near here/She was planning to diversify and she sang I should do the same/So I whistled to her how I loved her the best," begins the song about the innovative turn-of-the-century dancer-choreographer. The opening lines resonate with a certain poignancy coming as the first song on the debut record by an artist who had lost his ability to walk in an accident. Chesnutt makes these words -- that work as a poem on the page -- come alive as song lyrics. But the chorus, "She sang 'I can't believe you own this attitude,'" is a pretty country melody, coupled with a wistful harmony. The song establishes a pattern for much of the record, and the arrangement signals Chesnutt's archetype austere sound for many of his subsequent records -- featuring the gentle strums of a cheap-sounding, often nylon-string acoustic guitar, wailing harmonica, a Casio-like organ, and Chesnutt's distinct drawl. Little -- which contains a picture of Chesnutt as a little boy dressed in a cowboy outfit with a toy guitar -- is largely concerned with childhood or child-like dreamers, including "Danny Carlisle" ("He wanted a tree fort more than anything/He wanted to build and defend one on his own/But the neighbor boys' BB siege was overwhelming/So he won't be building his dream fort anymore...Danny Carlisle is barely grown and he's used up most of his options") and "Gepetto" ("Apropos! he had to go!/He loved the Alps, but he hated the snow/Things switch, chop a new niche/Soon you won't remember which one is which/Your sorrow is so silly, what was there to keep him in Italy?/He'll send you news how he took a cruise/Stuck his sea legs in sailor shoes"). The lush, rich poetry of the lyrics is counterbalanced by Stipe's stark production, with mostly live-sounding performances by Chesnutt accompanied by little more than his guitar. The recordings were done as demos, "on an October day in 1988 at John Keane's gussied up studio...me feeling rather rough from the night before," writes Chesnutt in the liner notes. But the immediacy and bracing energy of the performances led to a 1990 release of them as is by Texas Hotel records. © Bill Janovitz /TiVo
From
CD$7.99

Pop - Released November 23, 2020 | Hatbox