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Rock - Released April 24, 2020 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released October 20, 2017 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released October 8, 2013 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released October 2, 2015 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released September 24, 2008 | Roadrunner Records

Trivium never asked to be described as "the next Metallica" by a hyperbolic British magazine or two, but because they tried to make the best of the opportunity instead of wilting away with apologetic shouts of "We're not worthy!," they've taken a hell of a lot of guff from radical heavy metal fans, already stirred up over the group's signing to the closest approximation to corporatism in their world: Roadrunner Records (who actually dare work with non-metal bands -- curse them!). Admittedly, the youthful Floridian quartet (whose confidence has been frequently misconstrued as arrogance) didn't help matters when the band followed its impressive sophomore album, Ascendancy, with an undisguised bid for wider commercial appeal via its inconsistent third album, The Crusade. Thus came something of a backlash even among their supporters, bringing, in turn, the stylistic retreat toward more uncompromising metallic terrain embodied by the group's fourth album, Shogun. On this outing, Trivium elevate their new millennium thrash to -- by their standards -- largely unprecedented heights of intensity and complexity, stacking riff upon riff (really good ones, too) into densely structured highlights such as "Down from the Sky," "Throes of Perdition," and the especially devastating "Kirisute Gomen" (which supposedly means "Pardon me while I cut off your head off" in Japanese). Corey Beaulieu and Matt Heafy's shred-intensive guitar solos also pepper every track, flying every which way like vengeful hornets, and the latter's always varied vocalizing once again prizes Hetfield-ian growls and guttural screams over more sparsely distributed (and therefore more impactful) melodic singing. Certain cuts may feel like they're jammed with a few too many different hard/soft/harder personalities for some listeners' tastes (e.g. "Torn Between Scylla and Charybdis," "Into the Mouth of Hell We March"), but most headbangers are bound to appreciate these very contradictions, which the band extrapolates to a monumental climax on the multifaceted 11-plus-minute album-closing title track. As for the lyrics: if these song titles didn't make it obvious already, Heafy's penchant for untowardly bookish vocabulary and obscure mythological references remains intact (see also "Of Prometheus and the Crucifix" and "Like Callisto to a Star in Heaven"), and will probably delight as many metalheads as it irritates, but at least he's no longer forcing unrelated words together as though he were simply reading the dictionary every night (which certainly seemed to be the case on The Crusade's confusing "Entrance of the Conflagration," for example). And yes, Trivium still show no qualms or remorse about emulating both the sounds and epic scope of vintage Metallica, but what's so wrong with that? After all, Metallica tried to do the same thing on their own 2008 return to form, Death Magnetic. In short: Shogun is easily Trivium's most challenging and ambitious album yet, and even though it isn't likely to spawn any hit singles, it was clearly the album Trivium had to make in order to get unduly prejudiced metalheads off their backs and finally silence undue suspicions over their abundant talent and devotion to heavy metal. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Metal - Released October 2, 2015 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released March 22, 2019 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released May 17, 2019 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released March 7, 2005 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released March 7, 2005 | Roadrunner Records

Trivium has only grown stronger since 2003's Ember to Inferno. That album's mix of classic thrash (early Metallica) with 21st century metalcore rage and progressive metal flourish still roils here. But Ascendancy's fire is more ferocious and its transitions more confident, which means the band is even more dedicated to its clever throwback sound. This is even more impressive when you consider that no one in Trivium is old enough to legally rent a car. The lineup has shifted -- joining vocalist/guitarist Matt Heafy and drummer Travis Smith are guitarist Corey Beaulieu and bassist Paolo Gregoletto. But they're a ridiculously tight quartet, unleashing thrilling dual guitar passages and pummeling kick drum gallops as surely as they do melodic breaks and vicious throat screeds. The verses of "Rain" and "Pull Harder on the Strings of Your Martyr" blister the brain, while Heafy channels James Hetfield effortlessly in the choruses. "Martyr" is particularly insane, its hurricane solos piled on top of percussion that simply engulfs the rhythm. From a technical standpoint, Trivium is often astounding. It's worth reading along when Heafy's screaming becomes unintelligible. Though his lyrics cover familiar territory -- gloom 'n' doom, emotional pain, revenge -- he gets off great lines like "You ask me 'Oh God why?'/'Cause I'm God, that's f*cking why" and "Disintegration constituents to decompose of the parts." Gregoletto steps up for the intro to "Gunshot to the Head of Trepidation" before it transforms into a metalcore rant, "Deceived" is downright melodic (but still totally heavy), and there's a great extended bank of guitar solos in "Drowned and Torn Asunder"'s midsection. Ascendancy aligns real-deal thrash with powerful modern influences. But at all times it's a platform for Trivium's own crazed talent. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 26, 2019 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released June 21, 2019 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released August 3, 2011 | Roadrunner Records

By and large, the heavy metal community can be counted on to listen with open ears and form individual, unbiased opinions, but some prejudices still run deep, and the members of Trivium have been on the receiving end of several of these throughout their career. Cursed by their own precociousness, musical malleability and, most problematic, their earnest ambition and self-confidence, the quartet has quite simply been blacklisted by a considerable swathe of listeners, led by self-appointed officers of the heavy metal poseur police, and helped none by their contract with leading heavy metal label Roadrunner, whose very success can ironically become an albatross around its bands' necks. As a result, Trivium have been dodging verbal barbs and metaphoric flying tomatoes ever since the modern melodic thrash of sophomore album Ascendancy (their first for Roadrunner, coincidentally), landed them on magazine covers and on stages with Metallica, who they proceeded to inadvisably clone on hit-and-miss third opus, The Crusade, before delivering a more brutal and technical sound on fourth album Shogun. But, since the latter still smacked unfairly against the immovable wall of the aforementioned prejudices, the group -- now armed with new drummer Nick Augusto -- obviously saw no other recourse than to revisit the less overwrought style of Ascendancy on its fifth studio album, 2011's In Waves. In doing so, Trivium prove that template to be their honest-to-goodness comfort zone, as song after song whips by, wedding equal doses of neo-thrash aggression and accessibility, represented by frontman Matt Heafy's alternating clean and gruff vocals as well as his and fellow guitarist Corey Beaulieu's jagged staccato riffs and tight-knit harmonies. Yes, results may vary from song to song, depending on the listener's tastes, but not Trivium's commitment to crafting fully realized, self-sufficient tracks under the stewardship of producer Colin Richardson (who stepped in for the less versatile Jason Suecof) and veteran Roadrunner A&R man Monte Conner (the man responsible for signing Sepultura, Cynic, and many more). But, naturally, despite all these merits (and, sure, imperfections, too), Trivium will probably be vilified once again for taking the same sort of creative backward step that the fans typically clamor for from Metallica, Slayer, and other bands on down; it's the essence of the Florida band's "can't win" lot in life, but there's always hope that this will change, in time. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Metal - Released September 24, 2008 | Roadrunner Records

Trivium never asked to be described as "the next Metallica" by a hyperbolic British magazine or two, but because they tried to make the best of the opportunity instead of wilting away with apologetic shouts of "We're not worthy!," they've taken a hell of a lot of guff from radical heavy metal fans, already stirred up over the group's signing to the closest approximation to corporatism in their world: Roadrunner Records (who actually dare work with non-metal bands -- curse them!). Admittedly, the youthful Floridian quartet (whose confidence has been frequently misconstrued as arrogance) didn't help matters when the band followed its impressive sophomore album, Ascendancy, with an undisguised bid for wider commercial appeal via its inconsistent third album, The Crusade. Thus came something of a backlash even among their supporters, bringing, in turn, the stylistic retreat toward more uncompromising metallic terrain embodied by the group's fourth album, Shogun. On this outing, Trivium elevate their new millennium thrash to -- by their standards -- largely unprecedented heights of intensity and complexity, stacking riff upon riff (really good ones, too) into densely structured highlights such as "Down from the Sky," "Throes of Perdition," and the especially devastating "Kirisute Gomen" (which supposedly means "Pardon me while I cut off your head off" in Japanese). Corey Beaulieu and Matt Heafy's shred-intensive guitar solos also pepper every track, flying every which way like vengeful hornets, and the latter's always varied vocalizing once again prizes Hetfield-ian growls and guttural screams over more sparsely distributed (and therefore more impactful) melodic singing. Certain cuts may feel like they're jammed with a few too many different hard/soft/harder personalities for some listeners' tastes (e.g. "Torn Between Scylla and Charybdis," "Into the Mouth of Hell We March"), but most headbangers are bound to appreciate these very contradictions, which the band extrapolates to a monumental climax on the multifaceted 11-plus-minute album-closing title track. As for the lyrics: if these song titles didn't make it obvious already, Heafy's penchant for untowardly bookish vocabulary and obscure mythological references remains intact (see also "Of Prometheus and the Crucifix" and "Like Callisto to a Star in Heaven"), and will probably delight as many metalheads as it irritates, but at least he's no longer forcing unrelated words together as though he were simply reading the dictionary every night (which certainly seemed to be the case on The Crusade's confusing "Entrance of the Conflagration," for example). And yes, Trivium still show no qualms or remorse about emulating both the sounds and epic scope of vintage Metallica, but what's so wrong with that? After all, Metallica tried to do the same thing on their own 2008 return to form, Death Magnetic. In short: Shogun is easily Trivium's most challenging and ambitious album yet, and even though it isn't likely to spawn any hit singles, it was clearly the album Trivium had to make in order to get unduly prejudiced metalheads off their backs and finally silence undue suspicions over their abundant talent and devotion to heavy metal. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 3, 2011 | Roadrunner Records

By and large, the heavy metal community can be counted on to listen with open ears and form individual, unbiased opinions, but some prejudices still run deep, and the members of Trivium have been on the receiving end of several of these throughout their career. Cursed by their own precociousness, musical malleability and, most problematic, their earnest ambition and self-confidence, the quartet has quite simply been blacklisted by a considerable swathe of listeners, led by self-appointed officers of the heavy metal poseur police, and helped none by their contract with leading heavy metal label Roadrunner, whose very success can ironically become an albatross around its bands' necks. As a result, Trivium have been dodging verbal barbs and metaphoric flying tomatoes ever since the modern melodic thrash of sophomore album Ascendancy (their first for Roadrunner, coincidentally), landed them on magazine covers and on stages with Metallica, who they proceeded to inadvisably clone on hit-and-miss third opus, The Crusade, before delivering a more brutal and technical sound on fourth album Shogun. But, since the latter still smacked unfairly against the immovable wall of the aforementioned prejudices, the group -- now armed with new drummer Nick Augusto -- obviously saw no other recourse than to revisit the less overwrought style of Ascendancy on its fifth studio album, 2011's In Waves. In doing so, Trivium prove that template to be their honest-to-goodness comfort zone, as song after song whips by, wedding equal doses of neo-thrash aggression and accessibility, represented by frontman Matt Heafy's alternating clean and gruff vocals as well as his and fellow guitarist Corey Beaulieu's jagged staccato riffs and tight-knit harmonies. Yes, results may vary from song to song, depending on the listener's tastes, but not Trivium's commitment to crafting fully realized, self-sufficient tracks under the stewardship of producer Colin Richardson (who stepped in for the less versatile Jason Suecof) and veteran Roadrunner A&R man Monte Conner (the man responsible for signing Sepultura, Cynic, and many more). But, naturally, despite all these merits (and, sure, imperfections, too), Trivium will probably be vilified once again for taking the same sort of creative backward step that the fans typically clamor for from Metallica, Slayer, and other bands on down; it's the essence of the Florida band's "can't win" lot in life, but there's always hope that this will change, in time. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Metal - Released December 2, 2016 | 5B

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Metal - Released January 1, 2006 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released October 2, 2015 | Roadrunner Records

For better and worse, Trivium haven't made the same album twice since 2005's Ascendancy. In keeping with their own tradition, they tossed out plenty to reinvent themselves on Silence in the Snow. Drummer Nick Augusto has been replaced by drum tech Matt Madiro, and producer Michael "Elvis" Baskette takes the chair previously inhabited by David Draiman on Vengeance Falls. Vocalist/guitarist Matt Heafy makes great strides in his quest to become a rock singer. It's true that he's been moving in this direction since Shogun, but for this date he worked with vocal coach Ron Anderson. His voice is enormous and his delivery clean throughout. In the past, the guitars provided the melodic focus in Trivium's songs, but here Heafy's singing claims that role. The first single and title track was demoed for 2008's masterpiece Shogun. It was left unfinished because it didn't fit the record's vibe. The nearly processional riff, the sweeping power metal bridge, and the hyperkinetic rolling tom-toms and bass drums, lay the groundwork for Heafy's soaring, storm-gathering voice. The chorus and hook are infectious and heavy. There's an urgent, almost straight-ahead stadium rock vibe to second single "Blind Leading the Blind," but the dual lead work and melodic tension in the vocal add contrast; Madiro's drums alternately swing and pummel, creating force and friction. "Pull Me from the Void" is slower, with its melodic breakdowns and galloping drums opening a space for Heafy's vocal to deliver a near pop melody. Third single "Until the World Goes Cold" is, despite a metal riff in the intro, melodic hard rock. Corey Beaulieu's and Heafy's formidable dual leads, thrumming bassline, and machine-gun drumming in the instrumental passages add heft to the hypnotic melody. "The Ghost That's Haunting You" offers the most emotional lyric and catchy chorus on the set even as the downward bang of the guitars and Paolo Gregoletto's single-line bass plays the changes. Two songs, "Dead and Gone" and "Beneath the Sun," contain virtually the same chorus -- an unthinkable notion on earlier records. But it isn't due to lack of imagination, but rather the pursuit of a single-minded creative focus. On Silence in the Snow, Trivium seem to have (finally) decided to become the arena rock band they've been inspired by and had in them. (Your own particular prejudice will decide if this is good or bad.) Every other record in their catalog hinted at their further development as a metal unit; this one doesn't. Trivium are using the building blocks of metal to pursue a wider, more nuanced, musical direction. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2006 | Roadrunner Records

Upon listening to Trivium's The Crusade for the first time, it seems remarkable that this is the same band that recorded Ember to Inferno a scant three years ago. While last year's Ascendancy hinted at what was to come, it still doesn't prepare the listener properly. The former thrash metal band from Ember to Inferno disappeared and was replaced by this insanely talented quintet that plays an aggressive form of syncopated, intense progressive metal. With vocalist/guitarist Matt Heafy, drummer Travis Smith, guitarist Corey Beaulieu and bassist Paolo Gregoletto, Trivium should be ready for the world stage at this point, and this album should clue in those who think is speed metal is some passé form of rock music. Check the twin guitars in "Detonation" as Trivium weave dynamic, melodic passages around a crunching riff. Or the vocal chorus that opens "Entrance of the Conflagration," before it erupts into kick drum-driven mayhem without ever delving into cliché. Sure, early Metallica are an influence on Trivium (the Metallica who released Ride the Lightning and Master of Puppets, not the current incarnation who left those guys in the dust to become a respectable rock band). This is not to say that thrash doesn't have its place in the mix -- check "To the Rats." Never has a drummer sounded so crisp and so completely in control of the beat than Smith does here. The quick yet devastatingly tasty guitar riffs that Heafy and Beaulieu concoct are creative, knotty and canny. Other notable cuts on this fine outing are "Becoming the Dragon," "The Rising," and the eight-plus-minute title cut that closes the set. Let's face it, though it's made and listened to primarily by the young, as a genre, metal has grown up and become far more sophisticated than it's given credit for. If anything, it's the only place in rock & roll music where innovation and creativity are flourishing because other than electricity and volume, there are no rules; the musicianship is top-notch, the writing gets better all the time, and production techniques are not the focus, music is. Trivium's The Crusade is a perfect example of what's possible. Along with other American bands like Mastodon and Slayer -- and an entire slew of groups from their home state of Florida -- Trivium are redefining the genre. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Released February 27, 2020 | Roadrunner Records

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