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Alternative & Indie - Released September 27, 2019 | In My Room

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Anders Trentemøller established his reputation during the early 2000s by releasing exquisitely detailed minimal techno and deep house 12"s, but his subsequent full-lengths and DJ mixes/curated compilations have suggested that shivering, melancholy post-punk and indie rock are much closer to his heart than dance music. Obverse continues in the path staked out by previous successes Lost and Fixion, with the tempos dialed down and the guitars turned up, but played with restraint. While Trentemøller has brought his previous album material to the stage with a full band backing him, he specifically envisioned Obverse as a studio project, resulting in songs that are much freer and more reflective. In some cases, this means that the tracks go on for a few minutes longer than necessary, but it all goes towards setting an evocative mood, something Trentemøller excels at doing. While he originally considered making Obverse entirely instrumental, he ended up drafting several guest vocalists, much like his previous albums. Rachel Goswell of Slowdive lends her angelic voice to the brooding, sprawling drift-pop of opener "Cold Comfort," while Lina Tullgren graces the more concise, structured "In the Garden." Previous collaborator Lisbet Fritze appears twice, with the heavy new wave tune "One Last Kiss to Remember" being a particular highlight, and jennylee of Warpaint delivers encouraging words on the upbeat, encouraging "Try a Little." While the guest vocalists all make welcome contributions, Trentemøller's instrumental arrangements are expressive enough in their own right. His weightless guitar-scapes are soothing, and when he unexpectedly doubles down on crushing distortion, as he does on several tracks, it's both alarming and thrilling. Likewise, the tricky drum breaks that pop up out of nowhere during the spiraling instrumental "Foggy Figures" make for some delectable brain candy. ~ Paul Simpson
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 30, 2019 | In My Room

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 1, 2014 | In My Room

With his early work being club-aimed music that was still musically rich enough for headphone listening, Danish producer Trentemøller came on like a composition student with a dark streak, plus a love of progressive house music and techno. His debut album, 2006's The Last Resort, was a deep, dark, and delicious overabundance of bass and reverb, thumping away like Berlin or Detroit techno but then layering melodies that touched upon pop, all while the producer side of the artist dropped every glitchy trick in the book. It would seem like he was showing off if those plentiful edits and layers-upon-layers didn't work, but when he went indie pop and soundtrack-esque on 2010's The Great White Yonder, the results varied. The album jumped from indie song to house-music-all-night-long with a Duane Eddy-styled guitar rave-up in the middle, and while this third effort does essentially the same thing (the rave-up now replaced with a twangy, dusty, "Personal Jesus"-type cut called "Trails"), Lost is where all the pieces fall into place. Blame the superior songwriting or the natural flow of the compositions as the indie group Low join for "The Dream," a song that's wistful and ruminates about life on the level of a beloved Pink Floyd deep track."Gravity," with Jana Hunter, suggests the soaring My Bloody Valentine anchored by the tick-tock of Kraftwerk, although the swaying melody and the swollen melancholy are entirely Trentemøller. "Candy Tongue," with Marie Fisker, is a gentle mix of electro and acoustic that plays to the producer's love of wonder and mystery, while both "Come Undone" with Kazu Makino and "Deceive" with Sune Rose Wagner border on house music for Goths, even if they come with a refinement the electro-industrial crowd rarely offers. As on his previous effort, the instrumental numbers cross over from clubland with the great "Still on Fire" thumping its majestic New Order-like bass, while "Morphine" flirts with drone and world music on a cut that feels like a dangerous journey to buy the drug, but "Hazed" and the hidden coda that complete that album bring reminders of The Last Resort's endless, echoing nightscape. It's an ironic title for an album that's so sure, and even if his early fans frown as their dancing shoes collect dust, complaining about what doesn't happen on Lost seems silly when compared to the wonderful and intoxicating things that actually do. ~ David Jeffries
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 21, 2019 | In My Room

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 24, 2019 | In My Room

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House - Released June 20, 2005 | 3rd Floor Records

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Rock - Released May 29, 2009 | hfn music

When you hear about a producer/DJ releasing a new mix CD, what you most decidedly do not expect to hear is a collection of quiet singer/songwriter fare, much of it in largely acoustic settings. And yet that's pretty much what you get on this album by Trentemøller, though the reality of the program is actually a bit more complicated than that: in amongst wispy offerings like Emiliana Torrini's "Lifesaver" and Grouper's weirdly ethereal but strikingly pretty "Heavy Water/I'd Rather Be Sleeping," are startling entries like a Raveonettes version of Joy Division's post-punk classic "She's Lost Control" and some kind of large-ensemble version of Soft Cell's "Tainted Love," both of which are excellent. There are also two songs from the back catalog of Suicide, Alan Vega's old band. This is the kind of collection that is bound to have a few clunkers, and sure enough, there are some doozies here: I Got You on Tape performs a weird and pretentious near-choral tune called "Somersault," and Four Tet remix of Caribou's "Melody Day" is similarly silly. But for the most part, the languid, semi-acoustic ambience that prevails through most of the program creates a quirkily enjoyable mood, and most of the individual songs are really quite good. The inconsistency is a problem, but not a deal-breaker. ~ Rick Anderson
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Electronic/Dance - Released August 28, 2003 | Naked Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 29, 2014 | Tam-Tam Media

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Progressive Rock - Released February 11, 2013 | Tigerspring

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Electronic/Dance - Released February 5, 2016 | Stunt Records