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Pop/Rock - Released November 23, 2009 | Independiente

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Pop/Rock - Released November 23, 2009 | Independiente

After the momentous success achieved with their sophomore effort (The Man Who), Travis' return to melodic rock & roll with The Invisible Band is once again personal and earnest. Having spent most of 2000 supporting Oasis and playing their own headlining gigs in the States, Travis remained humble while collecting a dozen solid tracks for another album, most of them plucked from Fran Healy's own humming and tinkering around with an acoustic. The Invisible Band finds Nigel Godrich (Radiohead, Beck, Neil Finn) mixing and mastering again, and vulnerability found within these songs is what makes Travis a decent band. They are not afraid to be catchy and they're certainly suckers for a sweet love tune. But Travis is conscious of the unconscious and reflects any kind of lyrical emotion. Debut single "Sing" is charming while addressing inhibitions within a relationship. The banjo is a nice touch, for it becomes a mainstay throughout and adds a slightly different touch versus the simplicities of an acoustic. "Side" and "Flowers in the Window" are instantly endearing with their Beatlesque hooks, but "The Humpty Dumpty Love Song" is Travis' finest moment of musical clarity with Healy's heart on his sleeve. Written while on tour with Oasis, "The Humpty Dumpty Love Song" reflects a hero's fading fervor of love lost -- "All the kings horses and all the kings men/Couldn't pull my heart back together again/All the physicians and mathematicians too/Failed to stop my heart from breaking in two." Indeed, Travis is the basic man's poets and The Invisible Band plays toward the simplicities of humility. They've done it again, but with more internal charisma. The Man Who took them from indie angst to melodic humdrum. The Invisible Band perfects the ever-changing growth within the band for something great. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 10, 2001 | Independiente

After the momentous success achieved with their sophomore effort (The Man Who), Travis' return to melodic rock & roll with The Invisible Band is once again personal and earnest. Having spent most of 2000 supporting Oasis and playing their own headlining gigs in the States, Travis remained humble while collecting a dozen solid tracks for another album, most of them plucked from Fran Healy's own humming and tinkering around with an acoustic. The Invisible Band finds Nigel Godrich (Radiohead, Beck, Neil Finn) mixing and mastering again, and vulnerability found within these songs is what makes Travis a decent band. They are not afraid to be catchy and they're certainly suckers for a sweet love tune. But Travis is conscious of the unconscious and reflects any kind of lyrical emotion. Debut single "Sing" is charming while addressing inhibitions within a relationship. The banjo is a nice touch, for it becomes a mainstay throughout and adds a slightly different touch versus the simplicities of an acoustic. "Side" and "Flowers in the Window" are instantly endearing with their Beatlesque hooks, but "The Humpty Dumpty Love Song" is Travis' finest moment of musical clarity with Healy's heart on his sleeve. Written while on tour with Oasis, "The Humpty Dumpty Love Song" reflects a hero's fading fervor of love lost -- "All the kings horses and all the kings men/Couldn't pull my heart back together again/All the physicians and mathematicians too/Failed to stop my heart from breaking in two." Indeed, Travis is the basic man's poets and The Invisible Band plays toward the simplicities of humility. They've done it again, but with more internal charisma. The Man Who took them from indie angst to melodic humdrum. The Invisible Band perfects the ever-changing growth within the band for something great. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 24, 1999 | Craft Recordings

After a debut album that presented Travis as mostly cheerful Brit-poppers and had a clear, crisp Steve Lillywhite production, the band changed things up on their second album, The Man Who. The foursome turned to Radiohead and Beck producer Nigel Goodrich to give their sound some depth while also writing a batch of songs that delved deeply into melancholy and sadness. So much so that when the record label first heard the results, they sent the band back into the studio to write some more upbeat tunes. Songwriter Fran Healy responded with "Driftwood," a seriously catchy song that nobody would dare call cheerful. The dourness and gloom of the songs is a perfect fit for the richly spacious production Goodrich brings to the table and Healy's majestically crooned vocals. He has pipes and range enough to fill a stadium or whisper in the listeners' ear just as convincingly. The band proves skilled at crafting big, echoing songs that never lapse into pomposity and can be taken down to low volumes and not lose any intensity. "Driftwood" is one stunning example of their blend of quiet tenderness and expansive reach; its acoustic guitar underpinnings, soaring guitar lines, strings, and Healy's heavenly vocals all combine to drive the song deep into the memory. Even more sticky is the band's early career highlight, "Why Does It Always Rain on Me?" It's a jangling, heartbreaking song with a huge chorus, beautiful strings, subtle production, and truly lovely vocals. These two tracks are hard to match, but much of the album comes close. "The Fear" is rambling, loosely played, dark pop that conjures up vintage Van Morrison, "She's So Strange" is a lilting Beatlesque ballad with nice vocal harmonies, and "Writing to Reach You," with its rollicking tempo and fiery guitar leads, almost rocks in context. Only "Turn" strays a bit too far into overwrought territory and sounds out of place among the other quietly melancholic and blue songs. The band and Goodrich work hard to create a mood and apart from that one song -- and the much heavier "Blue Flashing Lights" that the band added as a secret track -- it remains unbroken and a heavy gloom lingers over the songs, which gives the soft melodies and sympathetic performances some real weight. The Man Who is a career-defining record for Travis, setting a course for their brand of medium drama guitar pop and trumpeting Fran Healy as one of the great voices of early-2000s British pop. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 8, 1997 | Independiente

Like most post-Oasis bands, Travis are determined to be a classic band, which means they are decidedly classicist in their approach. Travis have the traditional Britpop influences -- Beatles, Kinks, Small Faces, etc. -- which are filtered through such '90s peers as the Stone Roses, Manic Street Preachers, and, of course, Oasis. Fortunately, they aren't tied to the '60s, like Cast or Ocean Colour Scene; they try to revitalize the traditions with harder backbeats and louder guitars, and Fran Healy's voice often strains at the edge of screaming. That approach can keep their conventional aspects entertaining, but what makes Good Feeling a successful debut is that Healy can write hooks, whether it's the anthemic "All I Want to Do Is Rock" or the stompy "U16 Girls." There are several slow spots on Good Feeling that illustrate how the group's sound has its limits, but it's a promising debut that establishes Travis as one of the better British trad rock groups. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 29, 2016 | Red Telephone Box

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Over the span of almost three decades, Scottish indie rock stalwarts Travis have persevered, both holding faithful to the sound that they helped break into the U.K. mainstream in the '90s and rocking long enough to watch their sonic progeny spread their wings and fly off in various artistic directions (see: Coldplay, Keane, Snow Patrol). And through it all, Travis remained reliable, seldom veering too far from the center. On their eighth album, Everything at Once -- a long-form commentary on modern life in the 21st century -- they revive familiar sounds and also push themselves into more cheerful and unencumbered directions. Vocalist Fran Healy's voice remains tender as ever on plaintive throwbacks like the strumming "All of the Places" and the warm "What Will Come," both of which would fit seamlessly on The Man Who or The Invisible Band. Rougher-edged moments like the '90s nostalgic "Radio Song" and the Muse-lite Wild West epic "Paralysed" sidle up nicely with the darker 12 Memories or Ode to J.Smith, their heaviest album to date. The highlights are the three most surprising tracks on Everything. "Magnificent Time" -- inspired, in part, by Keane's Tim Rice-Oxley -- is a positively ebullient number that bursts with joy. Within the Travis discography, it's a bit jolting -- think "Selfish Jean" with a lot more sunshine -- but the band's happiness is infectious. The title track, penned by bassist Dougie Payne, injects a funky strut to the album, with a slinky bassline and speak-singing reminiscent of Achtung Baby/Zooropa-era U2. "Idlewild," a magical duet with English singer/songwriter Josephine Oniyama, pops up toward the end of the album. There's a slightly disconcerting tone, despite the gorgeous manner in which Healy and Oniyama trade off verses, like a less scary version of Nick Cave's Murder Ballad duet with Kylie Minogue. The album closes with the uplifting radio-ready U2-meets-OneRepublic "Strangers on a Train." All at once, it reflects both the bands that influenced them and the ones that they have influenced over the years. The album's title may refer to modern society's urge for instant gratification, but it also provides a symbolic nod to what Travis have done over the course of their career. Everything at Once is their liveliest and most lighthearted effort to date, a celebration of both their legacy and their maturity. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 1, 2004 | Independiente

Next to Coldplay, no other band was as successful in disseminating post-Britpop in the early 2000s as the Scottish four-piece Travis. Ironically, starting out as a neo-trad rock outfit on its 1997 debut album, Good Feeling, the band soon experienced a kind of soft rock epiphany and by its 1999 follow-up, The Man Who, was pursuing a decidedly more low-key acoustic sound. Centered around the delicately sanguine vocals of Fran Healy, Travis found radio-friendly currency with such melancholy anthems as "Why Does It Always Rain On Me?," "Sing," and "Flowers in the Window." However, despite a knack for catchy melodies and heartfelt lyrical sentiments, Travis albums often have a "samey" quality, which makes Singles such a pleasant addition to the band's catalog. Featuring every one of Travis' singles -- including the aforementioned hits -- as well as a new cut, Singles works as a great introduction to the band, hitting all the high points while avoiding any mid-album filler. Of course, some memorable album tracks like "Safe" can't technically be included here, and fans will have to wait for the inevitable "best-of" disc for a more complete Travis picture. Until then, Singles will do just fine, thanks. © Matt Collar /TiVo
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 1999 | Craft Recordings

After a debut album that presented Travis as mostly cheerful Brit-poppers and had a clear, crisp Steve Lillywhite production, the band changed things up on their second album, The Man Who. The foursome turned to Radiohead and Beck producer Nigel Goodrich to give their sound some depth while also writing a batch of songs that delved deeply into melancholy and sadness. So much so that when the record label first heard the results, they sent the band back into the studio to write some more upbeat tunes. Songwriter Fran Healy responded with "Driftwood," a seriously catchy song that nobody would dare call cheerful. The dourness and gloom of the songs is a perfect fit for the richly spacious production Goodrich brings to the table and Healy's majestically crooned vocals. He has pipes and range enough to fill a stadium or whisper in the listeners' ear just as convincingly. The band proves skilled at crafting big, echoing songs that never lapse into pomposity and can be taken down to low volumes and not lose any intensity. "Driftwood" is one stunning example of their blend of quiet tenderness and expansive reach; its acoustic guitar underpinnings, soaring guitar lines, strings, and Healy's heavenly vocals all combine to drive the song deep into the memory. Even more sticky is the band's early career highlight, "Why Does It Always Rain on Me?" It's a jangling, heartbreaking song with a huge chorus, beautiful strings, subtle production, and truly lovely vocals. These two tracks are hard to match, but much of the album comes close. "The Fear" is rambling, loosely played, dark pop that conjures up vintage Van Morrison, "She's So Strange" is a lilting Beatlesque ballad with nice vocal harmonies, and "Writing to Reach You," with its rollicking tempo and fiery guitar leads, almost rocks in context. Only "Turn" strays a bit too far into overwrought territory and sounds out of place among the other quietly melancholic and blue songs. The band and Goodrich work hard to create a mood and apart from that one song -- and the much heavier "Blue Flashing Lights" that the band added as a secret track -- it remains unbroken and a heavy gloom lingers over the songs, which gives the soft melodies and sympathetic performances some real weight. The Man Who is a career-defining record for Travis, setting a course for their brand of medium drama guitar pop and trumpeting Fran Healy as one of the great voices of early-2000s British pop. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 21, 2019 | Craft Recordings

When they took the stage at Glastonbury in 1999, Travis were a relatively popular band. Their first album, 1997's Good Feeling, had sold fairly well and they had recently released a new record, The Man Who, that featured a more mature, thoughtful sound. It also contained their first great song, "Why Does It Always Rain on Me?" The band's set turned them from hopefuls into an instant success when, after a solid start, the skies suddenly opened as the band began playing "Why Does It Always Rain on Me?," drenching the crowd and making for a legendary moment. Their performance and the press coverage of it helped propel the "Rain" single and album to the top spot on the charts and turned the band's fortunes around. The next year they were big enough to headline Glastonbury. The show was recorded and finally saw official release 20 years later in 2019. It's a fun time capsule; the band sound like they're having a blast playing to a big crowd and the songs have a rough-edged charm that is quite different from the smooth sound of their albums. They have a wiry looseness and Fran Healy pushes his vocals to the edge of his range, especially on fiery takes of "All I Wanna Do Is Rock" and the giddy rocker "Yeah Yeah Yeah." Thanks to the BBC, the sound quality of the recording is top-notch and Live at Glastonbury '99 is a lovely belated gift for fans. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 12, 2001 | Craft Recordings

After the momentous success achieved with their sophomore effort (The Man Who), Travis' return to melodic rock & roll with The Invisible Band is once again personal and earnest. Having spent most of 2000 supporting Oasis and playing their own headlining gigs in the States, Travis remained humble while collecting a dozen solid tracks for another album, most of them plucked from Fran Healy's own humming and tinkering around with an acoustic. The Invisible Band finds Nigel Godrich (Radiohead, Beck, Neil Finn) mixing and mastering again, and vulnerability found within these songs is what makes Travis a decent band. They are not afraid to be catchy and they're certainly suckers for a sweet love tune. But Travis is conscious of the unconscious and reflects any kind of lyrical emotion. Debut single "Sing" is charming while addressing inhibitions within a relationship. The banjo is a nice touch, for it becomes a mainstay throughout and adds a slightly different touch versus the simplicities of an acoustic. "Side" and "Flowers in the Window" are instantly endearing with their Beatlesque hooks, but "The Humpty Dumpty Love Song" is Travis' finest moment of musical clarity with Healy's heart on his sleeve. Written while on tour with Oasis, "The Humpty Dumpty Love Song" reflects a hero's fading fervor of love lost -- "All the kings horses and all the kings men/Couldn't pull my heart back together again/All the physicians and mathematicians too/Failed to stop my heart from breaking in two." Indeed, Travis is the basic man's poets and The Invisible Band plays toward the simplicities of humility. They've done it again, but with more internal charisma. The Man Who took them from indie angst to melodic humdrum. The Invisible Band perfects the ever-changing growth within the band for something great. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
CD$13.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 7, 2007 | Craft Recordings

Early in their career, Travis sounded like Oasis crossed with U2, and as the years rolled steadily on, they gradually replaced Oasis with Radiohead, without ditching that devotion U2. Travis may have cut out any of their overt rock influences, yet they retained the everyday, boys-next-door image that was so common in all the post-Britpop guitar bands, and that humility served them well on their 1999 sophomore effort, The Man Who, a commercial breakthrough that also established the soft, shimmering sound that was their signature. Unfortunately for them, not long after that album, they were eclipsed by Coldplay, another Radiohead-U2 fusion that managed to keep some sense of majesty to their music, something that Travis, sensible lads that they are, seemed to studiously avoid. In the wake of that simultaneous success and eclipse, the group survived some professional and personal struggles, taking four years to record their fifth album, 2007's The Boy with No Name. Far from being a long-gestating leap forward, The Boy with No Name offers a comfortable, familiar Travis, but there is a slight, subtle difference: the band has truly embraced their modesty, settling into their gentleness. There's a mild, untroubling weariness to their performances here that suits them quite well; it deepens the music, makes their deliberate tempos resonate, it makes the quietness feel contemplative, it even makes the cleanliness of the production feel right, a reflection of their maturity. If the melodies don't really dig in, they nevertheless float sweetly, meshing into the overall fabric and feel of the album. If the music never quite soars, it never seems as if the band is struggling in vain to achieve take-off, either. For the first time since The Man Who, Travis doesn't seem to strive to achieve something, they just exist, and their music is better for it. They're still ordinary, almost painfully so, but they don't seem pedestrian, they seem to have weathered some ups and downs, channeling that experience into an album that has a slight, yet palpable, emotional resonance that their predecessors often lacked. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$0.99

Rock - Released May 28, 2001 | Independiente

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Rock - Released May 7, 2007 | Independiente

Early in their career, Travis sounded like Oasis crossed with U2, and as the years rolled steadily on, they gradually replaced Oasis with Radiohead, without ditching that devotion U2. Travis may have cut out any of their overt rock influences, yet they retained the everyday, boys-next-door image that was so common in all the post-Britpop guitar bands, and that humility served them well on their 1999 sophomore effort, The Man Who, a commercial breakthrough that also established the soft, shimmering sound that was their signature. Unfortunately for them, not long after that album, they were eclipsed by Coldplay, another Radiohead-U2 fusion that managed to keep some sense of majesty to their music, something that Travis, sensible lads that they are, seemed to studiously avoid. In the wake of that simultaneous success and eclipse, the group survived some professional and personal struggles, taking four years to record their fifth album, 2007's The Boy with No Name. Far from being a long-gestating leap forward, The Boy with No Name offers a comfortable, familiar Travis, but there is a slight, subtle difference: the band has truly embraced their modesty, settling into their gentleness. There's a mild, untroubling weariness to their performances here that suits them quite well; it deepens the music, makes their deliberate tempos resonate, it makes the quietness feel contemplative, it even makes the cleanliness of the production feel right, a reflection of their maturity. If the melodies don't really dig in, they nevertheless float sweetly, meshing into the overall fabric and feel of the album. If the music never quite soars, it never seems as if the band is struggling in vain to achieve take-off, either. For the first time since The Man Who, Travis doesn't seem to strive to achieve something, they just exist, and their music is better for it. They're still ordinary, almost painfully so, but they don't seem pedestrian, they seem to have weathered some ups and downs, channeling that experience into an album that has a slight, yet palpable, emotional resonance that their predecessors often lacked. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 13, 2003 | Independiente

As much heat as the group received for The Invisible Band not matching the charm of The Man Who, Travis is still a good pop band. To imagine a world without them and their lovely and amusing songs would be a sad thing. In fact, their fourth album, 12 Memories, might never have been if drummer Neil Primrose hadn't survived a tragic dive while vacationing in France in summer 2002. Primrose sustained a spinal injury in a pool accident; thankfully the odds of a recovery were good, and Primrose went through surgery without any complications. 12 Memories is a dark reflection of that time, not to mention a heavy soundscape looking at violence as a whole that stems from a post-September 11th way of life. 12 Memories is their most mature, most explicit, and most somber album, and fans looking for Travis to resort back to the blazing riffs of "All I Wanna Do Is Rock" obviously didn't come of age with the band as they should have. The world's a fragile place, and Healy wants to talk about it. He's on his soapbox and instead of pointing a finger in disgust, he and Travis craft beautiful melodies that do just as much damage. From slagging off a media-obsessed America and its political regime on the jaunty, new wave-tinged "The Beautiful Occupation" to the soft piano-pounce of "How Many Hearts," 12 Memories flows without any preconceptions of what Travis released previously. They really don't care. What they care about is love and spreading it through song. Healy's look back at his mum's spousal abuse on "Re-Offender" finds Travis maintaining a sweet, basic rock sound and hitting you hard in the face. If you're able to appreciate the pleasure and point they bring as a whole, 12 Memories will be a fine listen. If you're hoping they took the Coldplay route, you're in the wrong place. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 14, 2003 | Craft Recordings

As much heat as the group received for The Invisible Band not matching the charm of The Man Who, Travis is still a good pop band. To imagine a world without them and their lovely and amusing songs would be a sad thing. In fact, their fourth album, 12 Memories, might never have been if drummer Neil Primrose hadn't survived a tragic dive while vacationing in France in summer 2002. Primrose sustained a spinal injury in a pool accident; thankfully the odds of a recovery were good, and Primrose went through surgery without any complications. 12 Memories is a dark reflection of that time, not to mention a heavy soundscape looking at violence as a whole that stems from a post-September 11th way of life. 12 Memories is their most mature, most explicit, and most somber album, and fans looking for Travis to resort back to the blazing riffs of "All I Wanna Do Is Rock" obviously didn't come of age with the band as they should have. The world's a fragile place, and Healy wants to talk about it. He's on his soapbox and instead of pointing a finger in disgust, he and Travis craft beautiful melodies that do just as much damage. From slagging off a media-obsessed America and its political regime on the jaunty, new wave-tinged "The Beautiful Occupation" to the soft piano-pounce of "How Many Hearts," 12 Memories flows without any preconceptions of what Travis released previously. They really don't care. What they care about is love and spreading it through song. Healy's look back at his mum's spousal abuse on "Re-Offender" finds Travis maintaining a sweet, basic rock sound and hitting you hard in the face. If you're able to appreciate the pleasure and point they bring as a whole, 12 Memories will be a fine listen. If you're hoping they took the Coldplay route, you're in the wrong place. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 19, 2013 | Red Telephone Box

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 1, 2004 | Craft Recordings

Next to Coldplay, no other band was as successful in disseminating post-Britpop in the early 2000s as the Scottish four-piece Travis. Ironically, starting out as a neo-trad rock outfit on its 1997 debut album, Good Feeling, the band soon experienced a kind of soft rock epiphany and by its 1999 follow-up, The Man Who, was pursuing a decidedly more low-key acoustic sound. Centered around the delicately sanguine vocals of Fran Healy, Travis found radio-friendly currency with such melancholy anthems as "Why Does It Always Rain On Me?," "Sing," and "Flowers in the Window." However, despite a knack for catchy melodies and heartfelt lyrical sentiments, Travis albums often have a "samey" quality, which makes Singles such a pleasant addition to the band's catalog. Featuring every one of Travis' singles -- including the aforementioned hits -- as well as a new cut, Singles works as a great introduction to the band, hitting all the high points while avoiding any mid-album filler. Of course, some memorable album tracks like "Safe" can't technically be included here, and fans will have to wait for the inevitable "best-of" disc for a more complete Travis picture. Until then, Singles will do just fine, thanks. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - To be released October 9, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Hi-Res
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 1997 | Craft Recordings

Like most post-Oasis bands, Travis are determined to be a classic band, which means they are decidedly classicist in their approach. Travis have the traditional Britpop influences -- Beatles, Kinks, Small Faces, etc. -- which are filtered through such '90s peers as the Stone Roses, Manic Street Preachers, and, of course, Oasis. Fortunately, they aren't tied to the '60s, like Cast or Ocean Colour Scene; they try to revitalize the traditions with harder backbeats and louder guitars, and Fran Healy's voice often strains at the edge of screaming. That approach can keep their conventional aspects entertaining, but what makes Good Feeling a successful debut is that Healy can write hooks, whether it's the anthemic "All I Want to Do Is Rock" or the stompy "U16 Girls." There are several slow spots on Good Feeling that illustrate how the group's sound has its limits, but it's a promising debut that establishes Travis as one of the better British trad rock groups. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released April 29, 2016 | Red Telephone Box

Over the span of almost three decades, Scottish indie rock stalwarts Travis have persevered, both holding faithful to the sound that they helped break into the U.K. mainstream in the '90s and rocking long enough to watch their sonic progeny spread their wings and fly off in various artistic directions (see: Coldplay, Keane, Snow Patrol). And through it all, Travis remained reliable, seldom veering too far from the center. On their eighth album, Everything at Once -- a long-form commentary on modern life in the 21st century -- they revive familiar sounds and also push themselves into more cheerful and unencumbered directions. Vocalist Fran Healy's voice remains tender as ever on plaintive throwbacks like the strumming "All of the Places" and the warm "What Will Come," both of which would fit seamlessly on The Man Who or The Invisible Band. Rougher-edged moments like the '90s nostalgic "Radio Song" and the Muse-lite Wild West epic "Paralysed" sidle up nicely with the darker 12 Memories or Ode to J.Smith, their heaviest album to date. The highlights are the three most surprising tracks on Everything. "Magnificent Time" -- inspired, in part, by Keane's Tim Rice-Oxley -- is a positively ebullient number that bursts with joy. Within the Travis discography, it's a bit jolting -- think "Selfish Jean" with a lot more sunshine -- but the band's happiness is infectious. The title track, penned by bassist Dougie Payne, injects a funky strut to the album, with a slinky bassline and speak-singing reminiscent of Achtung Baby/Zooropa-era U2. "Idlewild," a magical duet with English singer/songwriter Josephine Oniyama, pops up toward the end of the album. There's a slightly disconcerting tone, despite the gorgeous manner in which Healy and Oniyama trade off verses, like a less scary version of Nick Cave's Murder Ballad duet with Kylie Minogue. The album closes with the uplifting radio-ready U2-meets-OneRepublic "Strangers on a Train." All at once, it reflects both the bands that influenced them and the ones that they have influenced over the years. The album's title may refer to modern society's urge for instant gratification, but it also provides a symbolic nod to what Travis have done over the course of their career. Everything at Once is their liveliest and most lighthearted effort to date, a celebration of both their legacy and their maturity. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo