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Country - Released January 18, 2019 | BMG

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Country - Released January 30, 2007 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Warner Brothers teamed with Rhino for The Very Best of Travis Tritt, the most comprehensive single-disc compilation of the rough-edged country singer's greatest hits to date. The two labels had teamed up in 2002 for a fine pair of Tritt collections -- The Rockin' Side and The Lovin' Side, each of which includes 16 songs -- but it's nice to have an all-encompassing single-disc collection like this one, especially for casual fans who don't want to buy two separate CDs. The Very Best includes the primary highlights from Tritt's Warner Brothers catalog, which began with Country Club (1990) and concluded with No More Looking Over My Shoulder (1998). Furthermore, The Very Best includes a pair of songs from Down the Road I Go (2000), Tritt's debut album for Columbia: "It's a Great Day to Be Alive" and "Best of Intentions," which charted number two and one, respectively. Plus, there are a few non-album inclusions, namely "Take It Easy," from the Eagles tribute album Common Thread (1993); the "Single Version" of Steve Earle's "Sometimes She Forgets," from Greatest Hits: From the Beginning (1995); and "This One's Gonna Hurt You (For a Long, Long Time)," from Marty Stuart's This One's Gonna Hurt You (1992). The only minor complaint is that The Very Best isn't sequenced chronologically. But at least the sequencing is logical, for the most part alternating uptempo songs with ballads. In the end, it's difficult to envision a better-compiled Warner Brothers-era single-disc collection of Tritt's music than The Very Best. ~ Jason Birchmeier
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Pop - Released August 7, 1992 | Warner Bros.

On his third full-length,Travis Tritt's rollicking cover versions of Buddy Guy ("Leave My Girl Alone") and Elvis Presley ("T-R-O-U-B-L-E") are nice touches and show deeper roots than the Gary Rossington co-written tracks here ("Blue Collar Man"). This is also a very diverse collection that shows off a little (though not a lot) more of the singer and songwriter's depths as a performer as well. Tritt's abilities as an authentic showman come across on his recordings, and did even at this early stage of the game, establishing him as a top-flight entertainer and concert draw. Producer Gregg Brown plays to Tritt's strengths, by selecting freewheeling country tunes such as Marty Stuart's "A Hundred Years from Now," Troy Seals' "Lookin' Out for Number One," and Kostas' "Lord Have Mercy on the Working Man" for his moneymaker to sink that countrified voice into. That all said, T-r-o-u-b-l-e is also almost indistinguishable from It's All About to Change: a good novelty song masquerading as more, a couple of ballads with big flourishes, and a large helping of Southern rock strut is a good formula, granted, but it's still a formula. And for a guy who claimed he never played it safe, this was a bit to close to the net for posterity to bear. ~ Brian Mansfield & Thom Jurek
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Country - Released September 18, 2007 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Travis Tritt proclaimed his influences early with "Put Some Drive in Your Country," which paid homage not only to Roy Acuff and George Jones but to Hank Williams, Jr. and Duane Allman as well. It was the lowest-charting single off Tritt's debut, but it sold him a ton of albums. Radio programmers preferred the ambitious "I'm Gonna Be Somebody" and the ballads "Help Me Hold On" and "Drift off to Dream." ~ Brian Mansfield
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Country - Released October 1, 2000 | Columbia Nashville

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Pop - Released August 27, 1996 | Warner Bros.

Under the direction of Don Was, Travis Tritt turns in one of his leanest and easily his grittiest country record yet with Restless Kind. Cutting back the country-rock flourishes that have always distinguished his sound, Tritt opts for twangy guitars, wailing fiddles, dobros, and unaffected guts vocals. Mirroring the stripped-down instrumentation, the song selection is straight-ahead honky tonk, rockabilly and traditional country. Tritt benefits immeasurably from this approach -- he has never sounded so alive. Actually, he has never sounded so purely country. ~ Thom Owens

Country - Released April 27, 2004 | Columbia

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Country - Released August 17, 2004 | Columbia

It's difficult to believe that Travis Tritt has been kicking it from Nash Vegas for nearly 15 years. For most of that time, Tritt has been remarkably consistent. He has espoused his own vision of outlaw country since the beginning. While marketed as one of the first "new traditionalists" and then refashioned as a progenitor of "young country," Tritt has followed his own redneck way throughout and for the most part made the records he wanted to make. My Honky Tonk History, is another chapter, though this one rocks pretty hard. Co-produced with Billy Joe Walker, Tritt assembled a stellar cast of pickers -- including Reggie Young, Pat Buchanan, Brent Mason, Pig Robbins, and Eric Darken in a very large cast for this date -- as well as some special guests. The title track opens the set with a rollicking firebrand and burning electric guitars all but covering a lone banjo that stands in for tradition. It's a juxtaposition that works, since Tritt's celebration of a hungry life of hustling is timeless. "Too Far to Turn Around," is a bluesy dobro-fueled ballad that is lean and mean, with Gretchen Wilson (one of the song's three writers) guesting on backing vocals. The intro to "What Say You," feels like a track off John Mellencamp's Lonesome Jubilee, but perhaps that's because Mellencamp duets with Tritt here on this working-class anthem. It's easily the best cut on the set, and the two singers are particularly suited to one another as electric guitars, mandolins, fiddles, a B-3, and Béla Fleck's banjo crisscross in a swirl of rocking country-soul. Honky tonk music proper enters the fray in Philip Claypool's "Circus Leaving Town," a modern take on the music that made the careers of George Jones and Ray Price. Texas R&B meets the country bar's sawdust floor in "Monkey Around," written by Delbert McClinton, Benmont Tench, and Gary Nicholson. It's greasy, raucous, and freewheeling with killer piano lines by Robbins. Of the ballads, slick as it is, Tritt and Marty Stuart's "We've Had It All," works well. Tritt brings the emotion in the tune right upfront and sings with conviction and grace, but the whining pedal steel in "Small Doses" makes the slow step of this low-down country tearjerker really stand out. Tritt's protagonist is a man on a barstool talking to himself, trying to buoy his courage to face the empty space left by a long-gone lover. In all, My Honky Tonk History is a solid, sure-voiced outing from an enduring and committed artist. Bravo. ~ Thom Jurek
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Country - Released September 24, 2002 | Columbia

After the disappointing performance of 1998's No More Looking Over My Shoulder and his departure from Warner Bros. Records, Travis Tritt mounted a surprising comeback with his Columbia Records debut, 2000's Down the Road I Go. Strong Enough, that album's follow-up, similarly tones down the Southern rock aspect of Tritt's musical palette in favor of a more straight-ahead country sound more acceptable to country radio programmers. In the opening track, the self-written "You Can't Count Me out Yet," Tritt addresses the premature rumors of his commercial demise as well as his return to form. "Some thought I was finally gone for good," he sings, "but those doubters just got rattled/'Cause I'm back in the saddle/Doing better than a body should." If so, it's because he has gotten better at playing the Nashville game, and while the album is not devoid of up-tempo honky tonk material, notably "If You're Gonna Straighten up (Brother Now's the Time)," "Time to Get Crazy," and "I Can't Seem to Get Over You" (each of which Tritt co-wrote), there are many sentimental ballads that look back regretfully on changing times, particularly "County Ain't Country," or treat romantic subjects. Tritt's composition "Strong Enough to Be Your Man," the album's advance single, is an affirmative answer record to Sheryl Crow's 1993 song "Strong Enough," which asked, "Are you strong enough to be my man?" Another good singles choice would be "Can't Tell Me Nothin'," and "You Really Wouldn't Want Me That Way," which also touts the singer's independence, could find a home on radio, too. The irony is that in such songs, Tritt is actually conforming to Nashville's dictates: using standard formulas or co-writing with music row pros, recording with the usual sessionmen. So far, it appears he can have it both ways. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Country - Released November 20, 2007 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

The harder Tritt rocks on Loving Time of the Year, the better he sounds. His Southern-boogie versions of "Winter Wonderland" and "Silver Bells" make a perfect antidote to sleigh-bell burnout. When he tries to be an "interpretive singer" on "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas," he falls flat on his face. Elsewhere, Tritt writes the title track while covering two by Buck Owens and one by Sonny James. ~ Brian Mansfield
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Country - Released July 3, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Country - Released July 14, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Better production means ballads like "Anymore" sound bigger and rockers like "Bible Belt" (with Little Feat) and "Homesick" rock harder. Travis Tritt brought in Marty Stuart for a duet on "The Whiskey Ain't Workin'" and revived "Here's a Quarter (Call Someone Who Cares)" as a catch phrase. ~ Brian Mansfield
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Country - Released July 14, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Greatest Hits -- From the Beginning features 15 of Travis Tritt's biggest hits, including "Country Club," "Help Me Hold On," "Here's a Quarter (Call Someone Who Cares)," and "Tell Me I Was Dreaming." Although there are a couple of hits missing, nothing essential has been overlooked and it's a first-rate introduction. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released October 6, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Travis Tritt's most personal album is the one in which he feels most comfortable with his Southern rock/outlaw mantle. ("Outlaws Like Us," in fact, features the voices of Hank Williams, Jr., and Waylon Jennings.) Tritt poked fun at his own foibles in the title track and co-wrote "Wishful Thinking" and "No Vacation from the Blues" with Lynyrd Skynyrd's Gary Rossington. "Wishful Thinking" and "Foolish Pride" are ballads that rival "Anymore" for power and Skynyrd and Bob Seger for production values. ~ Brian Mansfield
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Country - Released December 15, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Country - Released July 12, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Pop - Released February 16, 2010 | Warner Bros.

Country music outlaws: they're tough, but put a wedding ring on one hand and a baby in the other, and they turn into cuddly teddy bears. Well, teddy bears with claws and teeth, anyway. That just about describes Travis Tritt's NO MORE LOOKING OVER MY SHOULDER. Recorded after his 1997 marriage and the 1998 birth of his daughter, the CD finds Tritt putting his wild ways behind him and reveling in the joys of devotion to his family. The impressive title track paints a portrait of an angry, lonely man who finally learns how to knock the chip off his shoulder. The bookend is the outstanding closer "The Road To You," a testament to the healing power of a good woman's love. In between, Tritt shows he can still get rowdy, with barn-burning rockers like "Rough Around the Edges," and the desperate "Start the Car." He also delivers a great rendition of Springsteen's "Tougher Than the Rest." But his heart is really in the ballads, like "If I Lost You,"and "I'm All the Man." Overall, Tritt's eighth album is the sound of an artist who's settled down, but still gives in to the urge to howl now and then.
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Country - Released April 22, 2003 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Released in the spring 2003, The Essentials is the third compilation of Travis Tritt's Warner material in 14 months and the fourth of any note. Since the two 2002 releases were thematically based, separated into one disc of love songs and one disc of rockers, this leaves 1995's Greatest Hits: From the Beginning as The Essentials' real competition, since they both cover the same ground -- namely, his recordings between 1989 and 1995/1996, with the newer comp extending just a year longer than its predecessor. Greatest Hits is three songs longer than The Essentials, and all but two of the 12 songs -- "More Than You'll Ever Know" and "Lord Have Mercy on the Working Man" -- on The Essentials are on Greatest Hits, and that record had a couple of songs that maybe should have made the cut, including "Put Some Drive in Your Country" and "Ten Feet Tall and Bulletproof." So, Greatest Hits winds up with a slight edge, but it is only a slight edge, since this is a budget-priced collection and it does, after all, have the basics -- "T-R-O-U-B-L-E," "The Whiskey Ain't Workin'," "More Than You'll Ever Know," "Here's a Quarter (Call Someone Who Cares)," "Country Club," among them -- for a good price. On that level, The Essentials easily satisfies. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine