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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 3, 2018 | Epic - Grand Hustle - Cactus Jack

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Travis Scott’s third studio album was expected to be his crowning work. After a complete dominance over the rap world and global hits like Pick Up The Phone, Goosebumps and Antidote, the rapper from Houston had a singular ambition for this ASTROWORLD, an album that was postponed several times. A choral manifesto whose result is up to the phenomenon. The album is a logical series of spurious and harrowing collages. Travis here rather poses as a curator or an art director than a total artist. He easily blends samples to concoct his own formula, an unstoppable musical behemoth. Uncredited guests are treated like samples in this massive explosive cocktail, despite the fact that they are some of the biggest names in the business, among whom Drake, 21Savage, The Weeknd, Frank Ocean and Stevie Wonder. This complete levelling of sources and tributes turn ASTROWORLD into a completely polymorphic work, both a mainstream blockbuster and a modern artsy piece. Already a few months old, his hit song BUTTERFLY EFFECT fully blends in, as if the album absorbed all the energies to spit out a single colour. Other tracks like SICKO MOB or NOBYSTANDERS sound like hit songs in the making, despite their complex structure. At the crossroads of sometimes diverging paths, Travis Scott creates a unique balance that could please both the mainstream public and music lovers keen on obscure references. Merrily switching from DJ Screw to the Kardashians, ASTROWORLD is the soundtrack of our times, an impeccable musical maze, vain at times, but in which listeners can delightfully lose themselves. And yet, Travis’ identity is yet to be uncovered within the plethora of strings and borrowed sounds. ASTROWORLD is a great sci-fi flick in which the replicant becomes the norm, the new musical human. © Aurélien Chapuis/Qobuz
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 16, 2016 | Epic - Grand Hustle

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Titled after one of Quavo's lines from the chirpy summertime 2016 hit co-billed to Travis Scott and Young Thug, this fitfully hypnotizing follow-up arrived after numerous delays, toward the end of the year's third quarter. "Pick Up the Phone" functioned as the lead single off Thug's JEFFERY, and it sensibly reappears here, buried in the latter half, de-emphasized yet not quite a tacked-on bonus. It's easily the track with the most pop appeal on Scott's second full-length. Released almost exactly a year after Rodeo, Birds in the Trap features little development, though the large company Scott keeps is quite different, and Metro Boomin is noticeably absent. Among the present is André 3000, who drops by on "The Ends" to recollect the infamous rash of murders that struck his city during his early childhood. The album's deepest verse by a great measure, it has no discernible connection to Scott's surrounding rhymes of cocksure nonsense. That remains the M.O. of Scott, who remains deeply into heavy accessorization and proclamations of dominance, as well as punctuations with affirmative exclamations cast in dehumanizing pitch alteration. Swarming basslines and sluggish beats likewise form the rhythmic foundation, with gauzy and tickling keyboards adding sweetness to Scott's hedonistic hooks. Only on "Guidance," through scuttling drums granted by DF, is there a significant shake-up. This time, Scott co-produced only one track, another Weeknd collaboration, and it easily slips into the album's scheme with its serpentine menace and lightweight lyricism. Among the others on the guest carousel are Kendrick Lamar, Kid Cudi, 21 Savage, and Cassie. They all pass in a slow-motion blur. ~ Andy Kellman
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 22, 2017 | TB Media

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 4, 2015 | Epic - Grand Hustle

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 4, 2018 | Epic - Grand Hustle - Cactus Jack

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 2, 2018 | Epic - Grand Hustle - Cactus Jack

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 6, 2016 | Epic - Grand Hustle

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 28, 2018 | Epic - Grand Hustle - Cactus Jack

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 4, 2015 | Epic - Grand Hustle

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While Lady Gaga was working the avant side of pop, hip-hop was doing the same thing without a true figurehead. Artists from Kid Cudi to A$AP Mob were coming at the genre from all sorts of new angles, but with their feet firmly in the rap camp; then producer Travis Scott came along, sounding like Chief Keef but with a much broader brush, offering an attractive version of acid rap that landed him on Kanye West's GOOD Music label with a debut album that's so 2015 it features the ultra-hip trifecta of Future, the Weeknd, and Justin Bieber. Make those three a Venn diagram and Scott is the man in the middle, wonderfully weird and as stylish-sounding as the first two, and yet with a slick appeal that crosses over like Bieber, which is the biggest problem for detractors: it's all for show with no filling. Still, with lines like "Always kept my city on me like it was a Swatch" and "My dick longer than a Pringle box" over beats that honor and match edgy acts like Death Grips (the raw "Piss on Your Grave" featuring Kanye West) and Future (who appears alongside 2 Chainz on the sprawling highlight "3500"), Rodeo is an absurd wonder that thankfully works. That's up to and including Bieber, Young Thug, and Scott's bedroom brain-burner "Maria I'm Drunk," which is the ultra sheen of Taylor Swift with the lust of Miguel experienced via shrooms. "Wasted" sounds like Juicy J did an album for Stones Throw, "Flying High" with Toro y Moi borrows some of Slave's "Slide" so the indie party people get an anthem, then the very big "90210" travels across decades' worth of film soundtrack styles while sampling the late Pimp C as T.I. narrates. Weird that T.I. doesn't rap, and weirder still that Scott barely produces on this album, handing it over to returning and like-minded collaborators like Metro Boomin, Ultra$ound, and Mike Dean. His executive producer credit, however, is on point as the aesthetics of his early work are all here, and with "We designed our love, around these drugs" being the album's most profound lyrical moment, he may not be Nas, but he may be Warhol. As Kanye and Gaga try to bridge the gap between pop and art, this artist thrives in the chasm. Like Warhol said, "I love plastic, I want to be plastic," and with Rodeo, Travis Scott becomes a designer drug. ~ David Jeffries

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 6, 2016 | Epic - Grand Hustle

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 8, 2015 | Epic - Grand Hustle

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 2, 2014 | Epic - Grand Hustle

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 16, 2016 | Epic - Grand Hustle

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 28, 2015 | Epic - Grand Hustle

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 11, 2014 | Epic - Grand Hustle

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 2, 2018 | Epic - Grand Hustle - Cactus Jack

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