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$18.49

Pop - Released November 9, 2018 | Columbia

This 2018 collection brings together 17 tracks from American alternative rock outfit Train. Featuring hits such as "Drops of Jupiter," "Hey Soul Sister," and "Drive By," the album also includes the band's rendition of George Michael's "Careless Whisper." ~ Rich Wilson
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Rock - Released March 27, 2001 | Columbia

Although Train's singles got heavy rotation on "alternative" radio stations, there's nothing cutting-edge about the band's sophomore effort, Drops of Jupiter. Train is a classic rock wannabe band in the mold of Counting Crows, although that's not always a bad thing. In fact, the best moments on Drops of Jupiter are the most blatant rip-offs, which means the band can sound endearing even when they don't sound unique. Does the hit title track remind you of Madman Across the Water-era Elton John? Well, it's no coincidence. Paul Buckmaster, who arranged the soaring strings on much of John's best work, reprises that role here, and session keyboardist extraordinaire Chuck Leavell channels John on the piano. And when lead singer Pat Monahan sings "When I get this feeling" in "It's About You," just try not to sing "I want sexual healing" over the actual lyrics that follow. Overall, this is a safe, solid second effort from a band that knows how to write hit singles. ~ Mark Morgenstein
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Pop - Released January 27, 2017 | Columbia

Train got a little bit of a shakeup once Jimmy Stafford left the band in the wake of Train Does Led Zeppelin II. Stafford's departure means Train is the Pat Monahan show, a move that doesn't necessarily result in a radical musical makeover on a girl a bottle a boat. Recorded in the months after the proudly retro Train Does Led Zeppelin II, a girl a bottle a boat bears no traces of hard rock whatsoever. Instead, Train dip into a variety of old pop styles, re-appropriating Hoagy Carmichael and Frank Loesser's old standard "Heart and Soul" for the proudly goofy "Play That Song," building "Valentine" on the bones of doo wop, and dressing "Loverman" in girl group accessories. Such colorful flourishes are not isolated. Despite such song titles as "The News," "Working Girl," "What Good Is Saturday," and "Lost and Found," a girl a bottle a boat is an exuberant album, a celebration of everything that makes Train such a corny band. The hooks are big, the production is so glossy that it shines, and it's so cheerful it's bound to irritate anybody who isn't on the band's wavelength. If you're with them, though, a girl a bottle a boat is a good time because of its eagerness to please. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$18.49

Pop - Released December 1, 2010 | Columbia

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$12.99

Pop - Released September 16, 2014 | Columbia

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Pop - Released September 29, 2016 | Columbia

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Rock - Released June 3, 2016 | Crush Music - Atlantic

Like many American men of a certain age, Train are fond of Led Zeppelin. Most of these men celebrate their love of Zeppelin by purchasing a spiffy new reissue or perhaps picking up a vintage Les Paul copy so they can finally learn how to play those Jimmy Page riffs, but Train aren't most men. They have the skill and ability to record their own version of Led Zeppelin II, replicating all the licks and studio tricks of the British band's 1969 classic. Of all the Led Zeppelin albums to painstakingly re-create, Led Zeppelin II is an odd one because the album was recorded while Zeppelin were on the road, stealing sessions whenever they could; it's the opposite of the meticulous approach Page used in the studio. Train decide to expend considerable energy copying this casually authoritative majesty, mimicking inflections and solos, even stereo effects. If you're not listening closely, Does Led Zeppelin II can be mistaken for the original: Pat Monahan approximates Robert Plant's timbre and the guitar overdubs of Jimmy Stafford and Jerry Becker can pack the wallop of Page. The slight details give away the game -- the vocal harmonies are too clean, too precise -- but they only reveal themselves with a close listen, which raises the question of what's the point of this exercise in the first place. For Train, it probably was a lot of fun pretending to be one of their favorite bands, but for an audience the results are so close to the original that there's not much reason to listen a second time: the first reveals that Train can pull off this stunt but never gives a reason why, other than "because they can." ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released June 3, 2016 | Crush Music - Atlantic

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Pop/Rock - Released June 3, 2003 | Columbia

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Christmas Music - Released October 27, 2017 | Sunken Forest Records

Credit to Train for capturing a specific seasonal vibe on their 2015 holiday album Christmas in Tahoe and, furthermore, for making it plain right in the record's title. Where most Christmas albums focus on afternoons filled with snow and evenings by the fire, Train zero in on a Californian Christmas, one with plenty of sun and margaritas to share. Appropriately, the band isn't big on carols -- only one makes the cut and that's "O Holy Night," its presence vaguely bringing to mind the Letterman tradition of Paul Shaffer singing it as Cher every holiday -- choosing to cover popular favorites from the '50s through the 21st century, throwing in a couple of peppy (and pretty good) originals along the way. The oldest song here is the 1950 Hawaiian holiday tune "Mele Kalikimaka," a novelty popularized by Bing Crosby, and the group also sticks in the '50s for "Santa, Bring My Baby Back to Me," which Pat Monahan hams up as a tribute to Elvis, but most of the tunes date from somewhere surrounding the '70s. Train cast their net wide, bringing in Donny Hathaway ("This Christmas"), the Band ("Christmas Must Be Tonight"), Joni Mitchell ("The River"), and Slade ("Merry Christmas Everybody") -- it's a wonder they didn't find room for Roy Wood's "I Wish It Was Christmas Everyday" -- and they also bring in Chrissie Hynde's "2000 Miles" and Tracey Thorn's recent "Tinsel and Lights," nods to good, varied taste one and all, but the real calling card for Christmas in Tahoe is its sunny, open feel. It, like Colbie Caillat's Christmas in the Sand before it, is an overdue holiday record for the West Coasters and there's an inherent charm to that sensibility that cannot be denied. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released May 24, 2018 | Columbia

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Pop - Released December 1, 2010 | Columbia

San Francisco's Train hit the charts with a bang early in the 21st century with hits like "Calling All Angels" and "Drops of Jupiter." Save Me, San Francisco took four years to make, four studios in the United States and England, songwriting collaborators, and even a handful of producers, though Martin Terefe gets the final credit. Save Me, San Francisco is a focused record, centering around the theme of a wandering young rocker who falls in love and wants to settle down. The title track opens with an acoustic guitar playing a variation on the classic I-IV-V progression, a snare kicks in, and Pat Monahan's voice is in prime Bob Seger confessional style. A piano and electric guitars enter on "whooo-hooo-hooo" chorus, and it's near-perfect radio rock. That said, the single "Hey Soul Sister," a love song with the best anthemic Train chorus to date, is the album's most memorable cut, name-checking Mr. Mister and employing a Madonna metaphor -- crediting her in the process. Acoustic guitars, kick drums, tom-toms, mandolins, and a B-3 underscoring Monahan's emotive lyrics and melody make it literally unforgettable. "I Got You" samples the Doobie Brothers' "Black Water" as an intro, and then further uses its chorus with a faux-reggae backbeat. It's a high-gloss, big-production pop number. There are a couple of Monahan's signature ballads here, too: the conflict-laden "This Ain't Goodbye," arranged with strings, and "Words," with its undying profession of standing in the eye of the storm to protect the protagonist's beloved. "Brick by Brick," with its swelling choruses, has a lyric that promises the moon and tries hard to deliver it, in the processional 4/4 time that underscores all of Train's power ballads. The album concludes with in "Marry Me," in which Monahan sings prayerfully, accompanied only by an acoustic guitar, flute, and muted percussion. Save Me, San Francisco is a love song to the band's hometown. Their loyal fan base will no doubt celebrate it to be sure, but more than this, Save Me, San Francisco sounds like Train are swinging hard for the pop fences. ~ Thom Jurek
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Pop/Rock - Released January 31, 2006 | Columbia

$12.99

Pop/Rock - Released October 26, 2009 | Columbia

San Francisco's Train hit the charts with a bang early in the 21st century with hits like "Calling All Angels" and "Drops of Jupiter." Save Me, San Francisco took four years to make, four studios in the United States and England, songwriting collaborators, and even a handful of producers, though Martin Terefe gets the final credit. Save Me, San Francisco is a focused record, centering around the theme of a wandering young rocker who falls in love and wants to settle down. The title track opens with an acoustic guitar playing a variation on the classic I-IV-V progression, a snare kicks in, and Pat Monahan's voice is in prime Bob Seger confessional style. A piano and electric guitars enter on "whooo-hooo-hooo" chorus, and it's near-perfect radio rock. That said, the single "Hey Soul Sister," a love song with the best anthemic Train chorus to date, is the album's most memorable cut, name-checking Mr. Mister and employing a Madonna metaphor -- crediting her in the process. Acoustic guitars, kick drums, tom-toms, mandolins, and a B-3 underscoring Monahan's emotive lyrics and melody make it literally unforgettable. "I Got You" samples the Doobie Brothers' "Black Water" as an intro, and then further uses its chorus with a faux-reggae backbeat. It's a high-gloss, big-production pop number. There are a couple of Monahan's signature ballads here, too: the conflict-laden "This Ain't Goodbye," arranged with strings, and "Words," with its undying profession of standing in the eye of the storm to protect the protagonist's beloved. "Brick by Brick," with its swelling choruses, has a lyric that promises the moon and tries hard to deliver it, in the processional 4/4 time that underscores all of Train's power ballads. The album concludes with in "Marry Me," in which Monahan sings prayerfully, accompanied only by an acoustic guitar, flute, and muted percussion. Save Me, San Francisco is a love song to the band's hometown. Their loyal fan base will no doubt celebrate it to be sure, but more than this, Save Me, San Francisco sounds like Train are swinging hard for the pop fences. ~ Thom Jurek
$12.99

Pop/Rock - Released February 24, 1998 | Aware

If you like your alt country a bit heavy on the alternative side, with light classic rock touches, then look no further than Train's debut disc. Fronted impressively by vocalist/songwriter Patrick Monahan and supported by strong, guitar-driven pop melodies, this is easy listening rock with crafty edges and unforgettable tunes. "Eggplant," "I Am," "Free," and "Meet Virginia" crackle with inspired hooks and reflective lyrics. Train's music is direct and basic. All around, Train is a total package of good music with smart songcraft. ~ Roxanne Blanford
$14.99

Pop - Released April 13, 2012 | Columbia

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Pop - Released April 20, 2010 | Columbia

$3.99

Pop/Rock - Released August 16, 2005 | Columbia

Pop - Released March 1, 2015 | Columbia

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$12.99

Pop/Rock - Released October 19, 2004 | Columbia

A truly refreshing thing about Train's Alive at Last is its sound; it feels like a bootleg recording, where the microphones were all located in the audience, capturing the performance as it happened -- flaws and all. For those seeking pristinely edited mobile unit sound, this isn't for you. This one is for the legions of fanatics that Train inspire. All of the hits are here, and the set opens with (what else?) "Calling All Angels" as the crowd loses it right away and sings along. Listeners can hear the beer bottles tinkling in "Meet Virgina" just before the band erupts on the refrain. Of course, "Drops of Jupiter" is here as is "Sweet Rain," "All American Girl," "Get to Me," and "Stay With Me," which closes it out. Train are on throughout; they don't sound as if they're going through the motions. It's the thing that people love and hate about them the most: they mean it, every word, every beat, every crunchy guitar fill that bleeds into the verse. The singalong parts are irritating, but if you've ever seen the band live, this will pull you in the same way it forces others to flee from them. In fact, this document is the perfect evidence for both sides. It's easy to understand why people hate them; their sincerity is pervasive and it bleeds all over everything. Conversely, this is also precisely why they inspire such devotion in a fan base that is utterly sick of "cool," "hip," "smart," and so on. They only enjoy themselves and affirm who they are with their peers. There are two new studio tracks here, but they needn't have bothered to include them. Not because they're bad or substandard, but because the live set is the story, the whole thing. Coming as they do at the end -- which is the only place they could -- feels like an afterthought and anticlimactic, which of course they are in comparison to this garrulous, excessive performance that gets at the heart of what Train are about for their fans. ~ Thom Jurek