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Africa - Released November 12, 2002 | Anti - Epitaph

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Revered by the Tuareg community, the band Tinariwen has astounded the Western guitar rock lovers who discovered it with its Radio Tisdas Sessions. The impact of their music completes the sensation left by the blues of Ali Farka Touré: that rock music owes part of its essence to the notes and practices originating from this part of the world. Produced in 2000 by the Angevin band Lo’Jo and English guitarist Justin Adams—future right-hand man of Robert Plant—this first album, created from recordings made in the studios of the Tuareg radio in Kidal, North Mali, transcribes Tinariwen’s dynamics closest to their everyday life. The interlaced guitars enshroud with their electric aura the poetic laments in Tamasheq and the rhythmics evoking the march of a caravan describe, better than colour pictures or HD movies, the magic of their region’s rocky desert. Eternal trances and dreams are within earshot and the rest of the band’s adventures was met with success. © BM/Qobuz
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World - Released September 6, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

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World - Released October 12, 2004 | Anti - Epitaph

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World - Released February 10, 2017 | Anti - Epitaph

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Rock - Released January 1, 2007 | Craft Recordings

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World - Released September 6, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

Reconnecting with the nomadic nature of their Tuareg heritage, desert blues collective Tinariwen roll out their field-recorded eighth album, Amadjar. A tumultuous history of exile and an improbable rise to international fame are the long-tenured Malian band's most consistent narratives as they continue to attract devotees from the Western world while remaining politically unwelcome in their own country. In October 2018, after the touring cycle for their previous album, Elwan, found them wrapping up at a nomadic culture festival in the Moroccan Sahara, the group set out on a road trip down the northwestern portion of Africa. Their ultimate destination was Nouakchott, the coastal capital of Mauritania, but as the trip unfolded, they began writing and recording parts of new songs in open-air sessions around their various nightly camps. By the time they reached Mauritania, an album had begun to take shape, and with their French production team operating out of a rickety makeshift campervan studio outside of Nouakchott, Tinariwen's last 20 years of globetrotting and guesting in unfamiliar Western studios were all but forgotten as they meshed themselves with their native habitat, singing and playing without headphones or effects under the stars. Amadjar, which translates to "The Foreign Traveler," is the result of both these outdoor sessions and subsequent studio augmentation by a handful of Western guests including Micah Nelson, Cass McCombs, Stephen O'Malley, and Warren Ellis. As might be expected, the overall feel is looser than on many of their previous studio albums and several cuts devolve into candid snippets of campfire inspiration, abstract noodling, and chatter. The skittering rhythms of "Zawal," one of several tracks to feature Tinariwen's on-site Mauritanian hosts, griot singer Noura Mint Seymali and her husband, guitarist Jeiche Ould Chighaly, rumbles its way to one such conclusion, its last twitching shaker segueing into what was obviously a brief part-writing session. The acoustic "Anina," with its snaking group chants, tumbles upward into the arc of its existence, its first uncertain notes rising into confident full-band crescendo then falling away into a post-song discussion between two members. Of the guests, Seymali's impassioned vocals are the most present, especially on the excellent "Amalouna" and "Takount," though Micah Nelson's mandolin and charango work adds some joyful sparkle to the upbeat "Taqkal," as does Warren Ellis' fiddle on "Mhadjar Yassouf Idjan." Given the back-to-basics, on-location concept of this recording, it's easy to wonder what the sessions might have sounded like without the help of the various rock musicians, who, in spite of their tasteful studio contributions, could be seen as somewhat redundant. That Tinariwen continue to extend invitations to outside inspirators, even on their own literal turf, is a testament to their unyielding collaborative spirit, and on this hybrid of an album, they again summon a common musical language while sounding as authentic as ever. ~ Timothy Monger
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World - Released August 30, 2011 | Anti - Epitaph

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World - Released February 11, 2014 | Anti - Epitaph

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World - Released November 20, 2015 | Anti - Epitaph

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World - Released February 10, 2017 | Anti - Epitaph

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World - Released October 7, 2014 | Anti - Epitaph

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World - Released November 20, 2015 | Anti - Epitaph

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World - Released February 11, 2014 | Anti - Epitaph

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World - Released August 29, 2011 | Anti - Epitaph

Tinariwen, the Malian Touraeg group, finally broke through to Western audiences with 2007's Aman Iman and 2009's Imidiwan -- culminating in an appearance at the Glastonbury Festival -- 20 years after their inception. The increased profile did little to alter their "desert blues" with its incantatory droning -- primarily electric -- guitars, claps and organic percussion, and chanted vocals in songs about struggle and independence (some of Tinariwen's members were once rebel guerilla fighters). That sound comes out of a nation that exists between the harsh Sahara and the lush African savannah to the south, but it has less in common with other Malian musicians because the band is nomadic, never staying in one place for long. Tassili, named for the region of the Algerian desert they cut the record in, is Tinariwen's Anti label debut. It is similar, at least structurally, to its predecessors. Tinariwen play their trademark, labyrinthine music on acoustic guitars this time -- a back to basics development in itself. Conversely, they've allowed trusted producers Ian Brennan and Jean Paul Romann some liberties in letting Western musicians participate on some cuts. Opener "Imidiwan Ma Tennam" commences much as their music has in the past, with the guitars and lead vocals of Ibrahim Ag Alhabib to lead his bandmates in a snakey weave of handclaps, chants, and secondary guitars to follow his own. A little later, Nels Cline's electric guitar almost imperceptibly slithers into the mix, with a stunning but blunted array of effects; they take nothing away from the song's essence. "Ya Messinagh" begins as a single riff blues before handclaps and a second acoustic guitar answer it in what is the closest thing to a Delta blues intro that Tinariwen has recorded. Ag Alhabib's soulful earthy vocals are met at the end of the second verse by the sonorous open tones of brass and reeds by members of the Dirty Dozen Brass Band. What's amazing is just how seamless their interaction is. On "Walla Illa" and two other cuts, TV on the Radio's Tunde Adebimpe and Kyp Malone add vocals and guitars; they add a textual element to other cuts while restraining themselves vocally and instrumentally so as not to intrude. These artists may or may not extend the Touareg group's reach into the West. If so, they've done so without Tinariwen compromising their sound. These songs are simply Tinariwen doing what they do best: being themselves, albeit more powerfully, not because of the collaborations, but because of the acoustic approach they've taken here; it's sound is dustier, more evocative of the desert vastness they wander. ~ Thom Jurek

World - Released January 19, 2017 | Anti - Epitaph

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Rock - Released July 14, 2008 | Craft Recordings

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World - Released August 20, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

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World - Released July 23, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

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World - Released June 11, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

World - Released November 10, 2016 | Anti - Epitaph

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