Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$36.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1994 | Polydor

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Double-CD set of 47 tracks that Hardin recorded for Verve between 1964 and 1966. His expressive, blues-inflected vocals and confessional songwriting are heard on covers and famous compositions like "If I Were a Carpenter," "Lady Came From Baltimore," and "Reason to Believe." The compilation includes every studio recording that Hardin released on the Verve label, as well as two alternate takes and 15 previously unreleased tracks. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
CD$10.49

Folk/Americana - Released July 1, 1966 | Polydor

Tim Hardin's debut album was something of a happy accident, a killer record at least a third of which was comprised of tracks intended as demos, while another half utilized a string orchestra that the artist knew nothing about. Whatever its origins, Tim Hardin 1 is one of the most powerful and compelling records of its era, encompassing deeply personal and compelling poetry, blues, rock, and folk in settings ranging from stripped-down Sun Records-style rock & roll to lightly orchestrated folk-rock. The beautiful, briskly paced "Don't Make Promises" -- which, along with "Reason to Believe," became one of the two huge songwriting hits here -- opens the album on an ambitious note, its sound mixing a small-band and string section behind a confessional lyric. "Green Rocky Road" and the rollicking "Smugglin' Man" are both more in a traditional folk-rock vein, showcasing the darker and rougher side of Hardin's singing, while "How Long" carries listeners into electric blues that is as raw and stripped down as anything coming out of the British blues boom of the same era, and which could've passed muster on Chess' Fathers & Sons blues showcase. Hardin wasn't happy about the presence of the blues-style demos on the finished album, but when they're placed alongside such startlingly original and personal songs as "Reason to Believe," "Misty Roses," "While You're on Your Way," "It'll Never Happen Again," and "Hang on to a Dream," they vividly show off the sheer range of Hardin's singing and his musical sensibilities. The string accompaniment on most of those songs reportedly wasn't to Hardin's liking, but Artie Butler's arrangements are models of restraint, and the bluesier cuts here keep the album from going too far in that direction. And so what if "Ain't Gonna Do Without" was Hardin's informal joke based on "Hi Heel Sneakers," never intended for release? It offered some of the best blues harmonica that John Sebastian ever laid down on a record. The result is a seminal folk-rock album, every bit as exciting and urgent as it was in 1966, and as important a creative effort as Bob Dylan's Bringing It All Back Home and Highway 61 Revisited. And this wasn't even Hardin's best album, though it set the pattern for everything he did after. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Rock - Released July 26, 2019 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res
CD$11.99

Folk/Americana - Released February 18, 1971 | Columbia

Tim Hardin was mostly known as a singer/songwriter, and a most prolific one at that, based on the number of originals he generated on his albums during the second half of the 1960s. Bird on a Wire was, thus, something of a surprise, turning up as it did with only six originals on it. Perhaps Hardin was in a bad way creatively -- given what fans know now, it's difficult to picture a time in his life after 1966 when he wasn't, at some level -- but as compensation, he did beautifully soulful renditions of the title track (a Leonard Cohen song), Hoagy Carmichael's "Georgia on My Mind," John Lee Hooker's "Hoboin'," and more. Ironically, Cohen was supposed to be Columbia Records' resident singing literary figure, but in "Andre Johray" and "Moonshiner," Hardin merged serious personal poetry and his compositional and interpretive skills in a startlingly intimate and affecting manner. The singing is exquisite, poignant, and powerful and the production is as tasteful and eloquent as any in Hardin's output. This might not be the place to start listening to Tim Hardin (though there are worse places for that as well) in terms of finding out what he was about, but it's also as essential as anything in his output and a lot closer to the core of who he was than, say, Tim Hardin 4. This was also Hardin's last American studio recording and one of the last records that he made before the physical consequences of his drug problem became obvious. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
HI-RES$17.49
CD$11.99

Folk/Americana - Released November 25, 1969 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res
CD$8.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2002 | Polydor

The Tim Hardin number in Universal's 20th Century Masters -- The Millennium Collection series of midline-priced compilations is a barebones effort, but it does constitute Tim Hardin 101. Hardin's best-known compositions -- "If I Were a Carpenter," "Reason to Believe," and "Lady Came From Baltimore" -- are all included. Hardin recorded for Verve Records, now part of the Universal catalog, in the 1960s, and seven tracks are drawn from his debut album, Tim Hardin/1, plus four from Tim Hardin/2 and one from the concert album Tim Hardin/3. There is nothing at all from Tim Hardin/4, an album of cover material, or from Hardin's later albums on Columbia and Antilles. The economics of song publishing probably limit albums in the series to 12 tracks, and in this case, since Hardin's recordings tend to be brief, that results in a running time of less than half an hour, which is skimpy for a CD, even a lower-priced one. But the collection presents the popular highlights of Hardin's career as a songwriter and gives a sense of him as a performer. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
CD$11.49

Pop - Released January 1, 1995 | Polydor

Originally titled Tim Hardin 3, this set was recorded live in 1968 with a backing band comprised primarily of jazz musicians. The support crew is a bit tentative; it's evident that they hadn't played much with Hardin, and in places the tempo comes close to breaking down. It's still a good, effective performance; Hardin is in good voice (a condition which apparently couldn't be readily counted on, even in his early days), and on the songs that had already been released on his first two albums, the arrangements vary from the recorded versions in interesting fashions. Live in Concert includes renditions of most of his best early compositions ("If I Were a Carpenter," "Red Balloon," "Reason to Believe," "Misty Roses," "Lady Came From Baltimore," "Black Sheep Boy") and half a dozen Hardin originals that didn't make it onto his first pair of albums. The best of these is the Lenny Bruce tribute, "Lenny's Tune," which Nico covered on her first solo album (where it was retitled "Eulogy to Lenny Bruce"). The 1995 CD reissue of this album adds three previously unreleased bonus tracks from the same concert. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
CD$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1987 | Polydor

The great early work of this top-flight '60s singer/songwriter includes the title track, "If I Were a Carpenter" and "Misty Roses." © Kenneth M. Cassidy & William Ruhlmann /TiVo
CD$12.99

Pop - Released February 8, 2005 | Rhino - Elektra

CD$12.99

Folk/Americana - Released September 3, 1996 | Columbia - Legacy

Hardin's Columbia period, lasting from the late '60s to the early '70s, was a troubled one that saw his songwriting muse wither and his personal life start to dissolve. Although his best work was behind him, he was still capable of recording good material. This 17-song collection is a good distillation of the highlights of his three Columbia LPs, which largely still found his voice in good shape. Original tunes were more of a problem: although the best of his compositions were on a rough par with his Verve work, by the time of 1972's Painted Head, he was devoting himself entirely to covers of songs by others. The Painted Head selections are the least impressive on this anthology, the spare folk-rock of the earlier Columbia sessions giving way to slicker arrangements that don't highlight his sad, wavering voice nearly as effectively. The remainder is pretty good, with the significant bonus of his sole chart single, a 1969 cover of Bobby Darin's "Simple Song of Freedom," and five decent (if sometimes unpolished) previously unreleased outtakes from late 1968. Simple Songs is the one album of post-Verve Hardin music to own. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
CD$11.99

Pop/Rock - Released August 10, 1972 | Columbia

This is a much different album for Tim Hardin, but it is much better than most would have thought. There are no original songs on Painted Head, but the song selection is so esoteric that the listener doesn't notice much. Backed by a crack team of British musicians, Hardin works his loose magic on such cuts as Jesse Winchester's "Yankee LW," Badfinger's "Perfection," and Randy Newman's "I'll Be Home." While other cuts, such as the blues classic "Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out" should have worked, they come off a bit flat. While Painted Head isn't that great an album, it shows that Hardin was trying to reel in his excesses and give his career some much-needed discipline. © James Chrispell /TiVo