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Rock - Released January 18, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Rock - Released February 26, 1990 | Parlophone UK

First released on Capitol in 1990 and reissued on Geffen the following year, Backstreet Symphony is a decent hard rock offering that should have done better. Enjoyable songs ranging from rockers like "Dirty Love," "An Englishman on Holiday" and "She's So Fine" to the power ballad "Love Walked In" showed that while Thunder wasn't the most original or groundbreaking band in the world, it wasn't lacking when it came to spirit and enthusiasm. Another high point of this CD is an inspired cover of the Spencer Davis Group's "Gimme Some Lovin'," which Thunder changes from blue-eyed soul/rock to straight-up hard rock. Rooted in the '70s, Thunder's bluesy, unpretentious sound is best described as a mixture of Bad Company and Deep Purple. Unfortunately, Backstreet Symphony didn't do much commercially on either its first or second release. ~ Alex Henderson
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Rock - Released January 18, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Please Remain Seated sees British rockers Thunder deliver the follow-up to their 2017 album Rip It Up. Inspired by their reworking of the single "Love Walked In," the group entered the studio to give more of their back catalog an overhaul, with the resulting tracks getting a radical restyling. ~ Rich Wilson
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Rock - Released August 24, 1992 | Parlophone UK

For a while there, it seemed as though England's Thunder might follow in the footsteps of Def Leppard or Whitesnake and actually conquer America with their powerful melodic hard rock. But, when faced with the ever more hostile musical environment of the early ‘90s (read: Seattle), all they managed was a smattering of critical support and a number of hit singles in their homeland. Still, despite producing but one big hit in the infectious, horn-punctuated "Everybody Wants Her," Thunder's sophomore album, 1992's Laughing on Judgement Day, was anything but a slump, and may in fact have been the strongest all-around effort of the group's career. Among the highlights, "The Moment of Truth" and "Today the World Stopped Turning" packed massive, irresistible choruses, while "Low Life in High Places" and "Empty City" provided stunning showcases for the formidably soulful voice of singer Danny Bowes (a latter day David Coverdale, in the best sense). Even borderline sonic relics like the partly funky "The Moment of Truth" and "Fire to Ice" (which bordered on AOR) were meticulously constructed from the ground up -- not that this meant much in the face of grunge. So even though there was not a single obvious clunker among Laughing on Judgement Day's 14 tracks, Thunder's sound was sadly already yesterday's news, and the band would never again replicate the achievements of its early career. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Rock - Released August 24, 1992 | Parlophone UK

For a while there, it seemed as though England's Thunder might follow in the footsteps of Def Leppard or Whitesnake and actually conquer America with their powerful melodic hard rock. But, when faced with the ever more hostile musical environment of the early ‘90s (read: Seattle), all they managed was a smattering of critical support and a number of hit singles in their homeland. Still, despite producing but one big hit in the infectious, horn-punctuated "Everybody Wants Her," Thunder's sophomore album, 1992's Laughing on Judgement Day, was anything but a slump, and may in fact have been the strongest all-around effort of the group's career. Among the highlights, "The Moment of Truth" and "Today the World Stopped Turning" packed massive, irresistible choruses, while "Low Life in High Places" and "Empty City" provided stunning showcases for the formidably soulful voice of singer Danny Bowes (a latter day David Coverdale, in the best sense). Even borderline sonic relics like the partly funky "The Moment of Truth" and "Fire to Ice" (which bordered on AOR) were meticulously constructed from the ground up -- not that this meant much in the face of grunge. So even though there was not a single obvious clunker among Laughing on Judgement Day's 14 tracks, Thunder's sound was sadly already yesterday's news, and the band would never again replicate the achievements of its early career. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Rock - Released February 26, 1990 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released May 11, 2009 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released January 23, 1995 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released May 24, 2010 | Parlophone UK

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Hard Rock - Released July 2, 2013 | Rhino Atlantic

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Hard Rock - Released September 20, 2013 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released September 25, 1995 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released June 21, 1999 | Parlophone UK

If grunge didn't come in and spoil hair metal's seemingly never-ending backstage party, there were several bands that appeared to be on the cusp of following the likes of Bon Jovi, Mötley Crüe, and Whitesnake up the charts -- such as Thunder. While they never teased their hair up as high as the aforementioned groups -- and their music merged the melodic metal of the aforementioned bands with more classic rock sounds -- they were still being covered in the same media outlets at the time (Rip magazine, Kerrang! magazine, Headbangers Ball, etc.). Thunder may never have broken out of mere cult status stateside, but they did retain a sizable fan base back home in the U.K., as they continued issuing albums over the years. And along the way, quite a few B-sides and rarities managed to fall through the cracks. Now, thanks to the release of The Rare, the Raw and the Rest, these odds and ends -- including the AC/DC-esque "Move On," a rollicking cover of the Small Faces' "Stay with Me," and the Bad Company-like "Fire Is Gone" -- can now be discovered by their hardcore fans. While none of these songs would have probably served as true "single material," The Rare, the Raw and the Rest should nonetheless be a fun listen for Thunder fanatics/completists. ~ Greg Prato
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Rock - Released February 22, 2010 | Parlophone UK

Like soldiers marching towards certain doom, British hard rockers Thunder stared down the indomitable forces of grunge as they unsheathed their third studio long-player, Behind Closed Doors, in January 1995, never losing faith in the rightness of their musical cause. What choice did they have, anyway? Well, they could have just thrown on the flannel and attempted to infiltrate the enemy lines like so many cowardly, fluffy-haired colleagues and make even bigger fools of themselves in the process, so give the quintet credit for sticking to their guns and facing down their fate like men. Needless to say, Thunder got themselves "killed" regardless, poor saps (everywhere but in their homeland the U.K., where this album reached a highly respectable number five), but at least they went down fighting behind every punchy, accessible, yet commendably earthy melodic rock nuggets like "River of Pain," "Stand Up," and "Ball and Chain." Thunder also embraced slightly darker vibes with memorable results on portentous opener "Moth to the Flame" and "Preaching from a Chair"; got the funk out successfully ("Fly on the Wall"), and not so much ("Too Scared to Live"); and noticeably toned down over all pomp rock thresholds, particularly on the bluesy "I'll Be Waiting" (boasting shades of ‘70s Whitesnake) and the folksy ballad "Til the River Runs Dry" (another weeper, "Castles in the Sand," sounds like a virtual memorial to this dying breed of ‘80s rock). But what Thunder couldn't do was carry on operating with confidence in their talents, as the alternative rock era continued to make mincemeat of their peers while swallowing up most of the media and any touring opportunities that had once been at their disposal. By the time Thunder got around to recording their fourth album, 1996's sardonically named The Thrill of it All, both their hopes and inspiration had pretty much run themselves dry. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Hard Rock - Released July 2, 2013 | Rhino Atlantic

Southern rock quartet Thunder's eponymous debut is a slick, '70s AOR slab of semi-intelligent guitar-heavy rock & roll that sounds like the middle road between interstate Kansas and highway Bad Company. This ten-track collection of radio-ready material isn't any better or worse than much of the mid-level, kind of "proggy" post-boogie rock of the era, and the production and playing is excellent throughout, but there is nothing here that hasn't already appeared on a Styx, Foghat or Little River Band record. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Rock - Released November 30, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Electronic/Dance - Released December 15, 2017 | Hard Impact Records

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Hard Rock - Released April 1, 2015 | Rhino

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Rock - Released January 11, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Rock - Released October 19, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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