Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$14.99

Classical - Released November 14, 2008 | ECM New Series

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles du Monde de la Musique - 4F de Télérama
CD$14.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Glossa

Distinctions 9 de Classica-Répertoire - Exceptional Sound Recording
Because Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed his five violin concertos in his youth, between 1773 and 1775, it is appropriate to regard them as works in the stile galant of the Rococo serenade, and to interpret them with a light, delicate feeling, rather than with a more robust, late-Classical approach. To the extent that they can render the music in this hyper-refined, mannered style, violinist Thomas Zehetmair and conductor Frans Brüggen give the concertos a sometimes fragile but generally warm treatment, and the Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century plays them with radiantly idiomatic timbres on original instruments. The Sinfonia concertante of 1779 is more advanced in style, closer to Mozart's mature symphonic expression, especially in the brooding Andante, and it receives richer orchestral textures and a more fluid approach in the exchanges between Zehetmair and violist Ruth Killius. The recording is immaculate, and the subtle distinctions between orchestral tutti and accompanimental playing are made clear, so it isn't entirely a showcase for the two elegant soloists. This 2008 double-disc set from Glossa allocates the Violin Concertos No. 1, No. 4, and No. 5 to the first disc, and the Sinfonia concertante and Violin Concertos No. 3 and No. 2 -- in that order -- to the second disc, so listeners should be attentive to the tracklist. © TiVo
HI-RES$35.49
CD$30.49

Classical - Released November 15, 2019 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Composed three centuries ago, Johann Sebastian Bach’s set of six works for solo violin stands as one of the holy grails of the instrument’s literature – perhaps the holiest. Now the great Austrian musician Thomas Zehetmair makes his own mark in the rich history of this music, revisiting the repertoire on period instruments. Zehetmair is an extraordinary violinist and a consistently inquisitive and self-questioning artist. He has not only played the big concertos but has given close attention to chamber music and new repertory, and has also found an extra calling as a conductor, channeling this varied experience into his return to the formidable cornerstone of Bach’s solo masterpieces. As a young man Zehetmair worked with Nikolaus Harnoncourt in his period ensemble, working with him to prepare for his first recording of the sonatas and partitas on a modern instrument. For this new recording, he draws out exquisite colours from two violins from Bach’s lifetime, both of them by masters in the German tradition, but there is nothing antiquarian in his approach – old instruments, for him, are tools with which to express a modern sensibility: alert, edgy, multivalent. His performance engages, too, with the superb acoustic of the priory church of St Gerold, in Austria where so many legendary ECM recordings have been made. Peter Gülke, in his accompanying essay, refers to the “floating spirituality” of this music, and to how Bach here offers one side of a conversation with the performer, whom he leaves free to determine matters of dynamic shading, phrasing and bowing. Zehetmair brings vividness and intelligence to the conversation on a recording that, deeply steeped in the music and true, is at the same time powerfully original. © ECM New Series
HI-RES$17.99
CD$14.99

Classical - Released August 28, 2009 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
CD$44.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Distinctions Diapason d'or
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Classical - Released March 18, 2016 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason

Classical - Released May 24, 2019 | Claves Records

Booklet
Download not available
CD$11.49

Classical - Released September 13, 2004 | ECM New Series

CD$8.99

Classical - Released October 21, 2013 | naïve classique

Booklet
CD$30.49

Classical - Released November 15, 2019 | ECM New Series

Booklet
Violinists will sometimes delay recording Johann Sebastian Bach's Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin until they feel they have mastered the music and even let it become second nature to them. Not so Thomas Zehetmair, who, with guidance from his mentor Nikolaus Harnoncourt, first recorded the Sei Solo in 1982 for Teldec, then waited almost four decades before revisiting them for ECM New Series. This time span has permitted Zehetmair sufficient space to reevaluate Bach's masterpiece and to present the music with a mature appreciation of its contrapuntal intricacy and expressive depth. Zehetmair played a modern violin for his early set, but for this 2019 double-disc, he plays two Baroque violins with replica bows: a 1685 South Tyrolean instrument for the partitas, and a ca. 1750 Joannes Udalricus Eberle for the sonatas. The sonorities he produces on these violins are subtly different, the 1685 contributing a bright edge to the partitas and the 1750 a warm resonance to the sonatas, all smoothed somewhat by the resonant acoustics of the priory church of St. Gerold in Austria. Zehetmair uses the sound space to determine dynamics and to shape his phrases, and his lines seem to float with an airiness that is rare in studio recordings. Even though the use of Baroque instruments and techniques may make this rendition seem like a historically informed performance, it is rather more of a personal take with thoughtful borrowings from period scholarship, a combination to be expected of one of classical music's most eclectic and versatile performers. © TiVo
CD$6.49

Classical - Released April 1, 2013 | Brilliant Classics

CD$14.99

Classical - Released September 22, 1997 | ECM New Series

CD$11.49

Classical - Released February 18, 2011 | ECM New Series

CD$11.49

Classical - Released March 9, 2001 | ECM New Series

CD$14.99

Classical - Released June 15, 2004 | ECM New Series

CD$12.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1998 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

CD$12.99

Classical - Released October 1, 2004 | Warner Classics

CD$8.99

Classical - Released May 14, 2009 | Avie Records

Proving that great performances can come from anywhere, this 2009 release of Sibelius' Third and Sixth symphonies coupled with Stravinsky's Violin Concerto, by conductor and violinist Thomas Zehetmair and the Northern Sinfonia, contains performances as fine as the finest ever recorded. This is particularly surprising since an earlier release of Brahms' Violin Concerto coupled with the original version of Schumann's Fourth Symphony featuring the same conductor and chamber orchestra was such a disappointment. But the flaws that plagued those performances, a scrawny tone and a scrappy ensemble chief among them, are nowhere in evidence on this disc. Indeed, the Northern Sinfonia's playing here rivals the best of similarly sized bands, with a cogency that none can surpass. Under Zehetmair's inspired leadership, they turn in a Sibelius Third that is strong toned and big muscled, but also lean, hard, tight, and driven, with a beautifully mysterious central Andantino and a wonderfully energetic closing Allegro. Sibelius' Sixth is both bucolic and tragic, with a closing Allegro molto that has far more unfettered fury than most performances by full-sized orchestras. But perhaps the most impressive thing here is the performance of Stravinsky's Violin Concerto. One might have thought that Zehetmair had opened the door to all manner of ensemble errors by leading from the violin, but in fact he holds the orchestra together without any sign of strain, while turning in a solo performance as stylish, sassy, and virtuosic as one could ask for. Though longtime listeners may have their favorite recordings of all three pieces, any fan of these works will surely enjoy this disc. Avie's digital sound is a tad raw, but still very clean and extremely atmospheric: in the concerto, for example, one can faintly but clearly hear Zehetmair cue the orchestra with sharp intakes of breath before each movement. © TiVo