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Rock - Released August 19, 2016 | RPM Records

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Pop/Rock - Released April 26, 2005 | Intersound

The Spencer Davis Group released a trio of brilliant singles in the late '60s -- "Gimme Some Lovin'," "Keep On Runnin'," and "Somebody Help Me" -- all driven by the amazingly soulful voice of Steve Winwood. Unfortunately, Winwood doesn't sing on this brief collection of the band's hits (he left the band to form Traffic in 1967). Winwood's voice is not easily approximated, and these re-recordings can't hold a candle to the originals. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1989 | Capitol Records

Kind of a baffling lot, EMI's 15-track The Best of the Spencer Davis Group is pretty representative if you don't want to go the full nine yards with the two-CD Eight Gigs a Week complete anthology on Island. Hell, "Gimme Some Lovin'" and "I'm a Man" are '60s Brit-beat monuments, and the bass overdrive of "Keep On Running" and "Somebody Help Me" aren't far behind -- Jamaican tunesmith Jackie Edwards really knew how to fit their beat band groove. But Best Of doesn't seemed to be programmed to make chronological or musical-flow sense, so it jumps all over map as the group takes chances beyond its solid take on straight-up '60s Brit-beat. The string-laden "Every Little Bit Hurts" is ambitious, gender-switching Brenda Holloway's Motown hit and going for James Brown "Prisoner of Love" drama, and it isn't half-bad. Steve Winwood sings pretty great on "Searchin'" (kind of an Anglo cousin of the Lovin' Spoonful's "Girl From New York City") and rips off some serious soul shouting on "I Can't Stand It." Winwood really was a staggeringly great singer as a youth -- "When I Come Home" is basic beat fare with blues experience lyrics, and damn, he makes you feel like he's lived the emotions, a rare feat for young Brit rockers of the era. He can't pull off the "working for the railroad" lyric to "This Hammer (The Hammer Song)," though, like "Strong Love" built on a country train rhythm reflecting the group's Americana fascination. And "Stevie's Blues" could be a primer on every Brit blues lyrical and musical cliché you'll ever have to suffer through (except length, but it was plenty long for a single B-side). As you might suspect from "Gimme Some Lovin'," he was a superb keyboard player, be it rollicking boogie-woogie piano on "Goodbye Stevie" or the flashier-than-Booker T. organ-with-piano instrumental "Trampoline." And kudos to whoever included "Waltz for Lumumba," a brilliant organ-and-percussion orgy over bass riff that looks ahead to world music, Winwood's later work with Traffic, and even Mike Ratledge-era Soft Machine. This Best Of is frustratingly uneven, particularly as you get farther into the disc. It features the key songs and shows the different sides to the Spencer Davis Group, but the tracks seem to be haphazardly thrown together, as if no one took the trouble to look at and program the selections to hang together as a whole. Guess that's why they have random play on CD players. © Don Snowden /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 29, 2010 | Cherry Red Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 2001 | Varese Sarabande

The Spencer Davis Group's Live Anthology 1965-1968 collects concert highlights from the band's three-year career, spanning their early blues and R&B-based sets to their later, more psychedelic material. The sound quality varies from track to track, but for the most part is better-than-average; highlights include "Every Little Bit Hurts," "Oh! Pretty Woman," "With Their New Face On," and, of course, "I'm a Man" and "Gimme Some Lovin'." © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 2, 1966 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

At the peak of their popularity, the Spencer Davis Group's albums were considerably less impressive than their hits and a bit thin on imagination, although they were never less than competent. This, their third LP, relies heavily on soul covers, as well as a few oft-covered blues standards ("Midnight Special," "Mean Woman Blues," "Dust My Blues"). Highlights are their second British number one hit "Somebody Help Me," the decent group original "High Time Baby," Winwood's organ-based instrumental "On the Green Light," and "When I Get Home," which (like "Somebody Help Me") was a hit in Britain, but not the U.S. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2004 | Cherry Red Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 1966 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Rock - Released August 21, 2006 | Cherry Red Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2002 | RPM Records

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Pop - Released November 2, 1965 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

The group's first album is basically a reflection of their early repertoire and very heavy on the R&B/soul standards. Dominated by covers of Ike & Tina Turner, the Coasters, John Lee Hooker, Little Walter, Brenda Holloway, and others, only three of the tunes are original. Two of these are written by Stevie Winwood, the other by Spencer Davis; Winwood's mid-tempo soul number "It Hurts Me So" is easily the best of them. Winwood is in fine voice and the group is energetic, but this is neither as good as their best work nor nearly as good as the best British R&B albums of the era by competitors like Them and the Rolling Stones. Includes their first two British singles, "Dimples" and "I Can't Stand It." © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 17, 2015 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Pop - Released January 1, 1974 | Cherry Red Records

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Pop - Released November 26, 1965 | Philips

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Rock - Released April 26, 2005 | IndieBlu Music

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Pop - Released November 17, 1966 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Pop - Released November 2, 1965 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Rock - Released January 1, 1973 | Cherry Red Records

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Pop - Released November 17, 1966 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Pop - Released November 17, 1966 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)